Creator: Investigation Discovery

A sister network of the Discovery Channel, Investigation Discovery focuses on True Crime dramas, along with Docu Dramas. Crime Reconstructions are commonly used, and will occasionally be recycled among their original programming if multiple shows happen to focus on the same case.


Shows on this Network include:

  • 48 Hours on ID, a title automatically assigned to any 48 Hours episode that airs, along with those produced exclusively for the channel.
  • Behind Mansion Walls: focuses on crimes committed by or against wealthy people.
  • Blood, Lies and Alibis: detectives use forensics to help unravel cases that are impeded by half-truths and denials
  • Blood Relatives: Spotlights murders committed within a family by family members.
  • Cause Of Death: Reruns of Forensic Files episodes that show how forensics help solve murders and other cases.
  • A Crime to Remember: spotlights crimes that were committed in bygone eras and discusses how things like racism and sexism affected how the cases were investigated and/or solved.
  • Dangerous Persuasions: First-person accounts of people who were enticed and later victimized by cults, false prophets, and other charismatic con artists or organizations.
  • Dark Minds: an unidentified Serial Killer gives insight on other cases.
  • Dates From Hell: focuses on people who are killed or otherwise assaulted on dates
  • Dateline on ID: operates in the same format as 48 Hours on ID.
  • Deadline Crime With Tamron Hall: The MSNBC anchor/NBC News host and her investigative team explore compelling, high profile cases and go beyond the headlines to get the full story.
  • Deadly Affairs: Susan Lucci hosts this show about adulterous affairs that end in murder.
  • Deadly Devotion: Similar to Dangerous Persuasions, these are true stories of people who experience crime and atrocities while living within America's unique subcultures and secret societies.
  • Deadly Sins: spotlights murders using the theme of the seven deadly sins.
  • Deadly Women, which spotlights female murderers.
  • Disappeared: Focuses on the impact someone suddenly disappearing has on their family and friends. Most are unsolved cases.
  • Dirty Little Secrets: focuses on murders involving secret lives and/or affairs.
  • The Devil You Know, about people discovering someone close to them is a criminal.
  • Escaping Evil:
  • Evil, I, which creates a narration based off of documents and interviews to get into the criminal's head as they're committing their crimes.
  • Evil In Law Focuses on homicidal mother-in-laws and their relationships with their daughter-in-laws and their sons & their motives for murder
  • Evil Kin: Murders and other heinous crimes committed by two or more criminals who were related to each other in some way, usually siblings. Had a Spin-Off titled ''Evil Twins''
  • Facing Evil: FBI profiler Candice Delong has interviews with the women from Deadly Women.
  • Fatal Encounters: shows how seemingly everyday interactions can lead to murder.
  • Fatal Vows: marriages that end in murder
  • Fear Thy Neighbor: Narrated reconstructions of neighborly disputes that ultimately end in murder and/or other forms of violence
  • Forensic Detectives
  • Frenemies: Loyalty Turned Lethal: Stories about best friends who turn against each other and commit murder or some other serious crime.
  • Happily Never After: features people who are murdered on their wedding day or shortly thereafter.
  • Homicide Hunter with Lt. Joe Kenda: retired homicide detective from Colorado retells cases that he's solved during his career.
  • Hostage: Do or Die, a retelling of hostage situations.
  • How (Not) To Kill Your Husband: Features botched murders and/or cases where the perpetrators were easily caught after killing their spouse. Mostly Exactly What It Says on the Tin but wives, girl/boy-friends, and even the killers themselves end up getting the axe sometimes.
  • I (Almost) Got Away With It, which interviews criminals who evaded or escaped police for a period before finally being caught.
  • Ice Cold Killers: Formerly Alaska: Ice Cold Killers; focuses on murders committed in the northern states during winter time as well as states that receive seasonally frigid temperatures.
  • I'd Kill For You: Focuses on murders that were committed by one person but masterminded by someone else
  • I Didn't Do It, which follows prisoners as they petition to prove their innocence from behind bars.
  • I Married A Mobster: Exactly What It Says on the Tin, but a few episodes have focused on the children of Mobsters.
  • I Was Murdered: Victim provides Posthumous Narration about how their case was solved and their killer brought to justice. Formerly named Stolen Voices, Buried Secrets.
  • Karma's A Bitch: a show where Steve Schirripa narrates stories about women getting revenge on exes, usually because they cheated on them, other motivations include abuse and break ups.
  • Kidnapped: House of Horrors: Survivors' tales of being kidnapped or held prisoner and narrowly escaping with their lives are recounted.
  • Killer Trials: Judgement Day
  • Mail Order Murder: Tales of mail-order marriages/relationships that end in murder.
  • Mansions and Murders: Similar to Behind Mansion Walls. Tales of wealthy heirs and heiresses who were the victims of murder in cases that involved their caretakers (usually as witnesses) in some way.
  • Momsters: When Moms Go Bad: A show hosted by Roseanne Barr channeling Alfred Hitchcock Presents that focuses on women who take their Mama Bear instincts too far.
  • Most Evil: About killers, which ranks the level of evil from 1 (self-defense, no traces of psychopathy) to 27 (psychopathic torture murders, with the emphasis on torture and a sexual component).
  • Most Likely To..: About successful high school students who commit murder as adults.
  • Motives and Murders: Later amended to Motives and Murders: Cracking The Case.
  • Murder Comes To Town
  • Murder In Paradise: focuses on people who are killed while working or vacationing in exotic locales.
  • My Dirty Little Secret: Cases where murder was committed to keep one or more personal secrets hidden from the public eye.
  • The New Detectives: how forensics are used to solve cases
  • Nightmare Next Door: a show about horrific murders committed in small towns.
  • Nothing Personal, a show about Contract Killers.
  • Obsession: Dark Desires: Stories recounted by survivors who were victims of stalkers, infatuated exes, and other obsessed maniacs
  • On the Case with Paula Zahn former CBS anchor covers murder cases
  • The Perfect Murder: Features someof the most diabolical, perplexing murders to hit detectives' desks.
  • Pretty Bad Girls: companion show to Very Bad Men also Exactly What It Says on the Tin
  • Pretty Dangerous: focuses on murders committed by beautiful women.
  • Poisoned Passions: focuses on murders where the accused and/or the victim are involved in unconventional sexual relationships (e.g., swinging, BDSM)
  • Redrum: Timelines trace murders backwards from the actual crime to the events that may have led up to it.
  • Scorned: Love Kills : a show about love triangles gone horribly wrong.
  • Secret Lives of Stepford Wives: A show about upper-middle class suburban housewives who were murder victims, murderers, violent perpetrators, or dodged a hit.
  • Sins and Secrets: each week it focuses on the dark side of a different city. Reminds one of A&E's City Confidential.
  • Stalked: Someone's Watching: victims retell their stories of being stalked. Some end in murder and are recounted by close friends and relatives as well as those who worked on the case.
  • Southern Fried Homicide: a show about murders that were committed in the South.
  • Surviving Evil: Charisma Carpenter hosts this series featuring survivors of attempted murders, assaults, and other frightening crimes.
  • Swamp Murders: Exactly What It Says on the Tin
  • Tabloid: Highly sensationalized crimes. Hosted by Jerry Springer.
  • The Injustice Files: typically aired during Black History Month, this focuses on racially-motivated murders committed against African-Americans. Some episodes focus on murders committed during the Civil Rights Movement while others focus on more recent events, such as the Trayvon Martin case.
  • The Will: Family Secrets Revealed: while not a criminal investigation show in nature, it focuses on the estates of celebrites (typically those who died untimely deaths) and the family members left behind who are fighting over it, mostly because said celebrity either did not leave a will, did not update their will to reflect changes like a new spouse or additional children, or deliberately left certain family members out of the will without telling them why.
  • True Crime With Aphrodite Jones: true crime author examines infamous murder cases.
  • Twisted
  • Unusual Suspects: focuses on murders committed by the last person one would suspect (ie family members, close friends, pillars of the community, etc)
  • Vanity Fair Confidential: A docu-drama that focuses on old crime cases covered by the eponymous magazine and revisits them with the gift of hindsight.
  • Very Bad Men: Exactly What It Says on the Tin
  • Web of Lies: focuses on crimes involving deceit on the Internet and social media.
  • Who the (Bleep) Did I Marry?: Like The Devil You Know, but specificially focuses on someone who unknowingly married a criminal.
  • Who the (Bleep) Did I Trust? Spin-Off that focuses on people who unknowingly trusted the wrong people in their lives such as bosses, friends, babysitters, etc.
  • Wicked Attraction: each episode focuses on murders committed by two people who are typically in a romantic relationship
  • Wives With Knives: Exactly What It Says on the Tin, but not all of the women profiled are married.
  • Young, Hot, and Crooked: Focuses of affluent teens and young adults who use their wealth and influence commit murder and other high profile crimes.

Tropes commonly seen on this Network:

  • Beauty Is Bad: Subverted in shows like Deadly Women and Scorned: Love Kills where the actors/actresses portraying the murderers are shown to be more attractive than their real-life counterparts.
  • Canada, Eh?: Launched a Canadian version in 2010; it was actually a Canadian version of Court TV that had refused to re-brand as TruTV due to CRTC rules designed to avert Network Decay.
  • Crime Reconstruction
  • Docu Drama
  • Genre Shift: Several. It debuted in 1996 as Discovery Civilization Network: The World History and Geography Channel. In 2003, it became Discovery Times, focusing on American history and shows about the American people and culture. It became Investigation Discovery in 2008.
  • Guilty Pleasures: invoked In 2012, began calling itself "Your Guilty Pleasure", and has created an official fan website called "ID Addicts".
  • Network Decay: While starting out as a network that focused on crimes and investigations. Many fans have recently complained about the amount of shows that depict the same crime shown in another one of their shows. This is really shown with shows like Disappeared, which is suppose to be centered around unsolved missing people, having an episode on Madelyne O'Hare. They have also shifted towards docu-dramas involving mob wives.
  • Stock Footage: Recreations filmed for one of their original series may reappear in another in bits and pieces.
  • Symbol Swearing: Who The (Bleep) Did I Marry? uses this in its title card, but transcribes it as Bleep in all its advertising.
  • True Crime