Follow TV Tropes

Following

History YMMV / ParisJeTAime

Go To



* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: "Quais de Seine," made by the husband-and-wife team behind ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', is about the relationship between the ethnic French and the growing Muslim community in Paris. Some young Caucasian Frenchmen tease people as they walk by; when a Muslim woman about their age appears, they mock her and even try pulling off her hijab. A few minutes later, one of the young men approaches the woman to apologize. There's some playful banter between them, and he asks her why she wears the hijab, as she's "too pretty" to cover up her features. The Muslimah politely but firmly explains that she wears the hijab as a personal choice--she likes the way she feels in it, and it connects her to a heritage she's proud of. The woman walks away, and the young man, after some deliberation, follows her to her mosque and waits outside for her. But when she emerges, she's with her traditionally-dressed grandfather, who seems intimidating... until the first man actually talks to him. The grandfather is glad to hear that the man is studying history, and brags about his own granddaughter's focus on journalism and how she plans to tell stories about Paris from her unique perspective. He then invites the young man for tea, and the three chat as they walk off together to enjoy the meal. It's {{Anvilicious}}, yes, but it's also a ''much'' needed reminder about the everyday reality of living in a mixed community, and how simple communication, abandoning stereotypes, and getting to know one another are the keys to making those communities healthy and building bridges between people.

to:

* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: {{Anvilicious}}: "Quais de Seine," made by the husband-and-wife team behind ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', is about the relationship between the ethnic French and the growing Muslim community in Paris. Some young Caucasian Frenchmen tease people as they walk by; when a Muslim woman about their age appears, they mock her and even try pulling off her hijab. A few minutes later, one of the young men approaches the woman to apologize. There's some playful banter between them, and he asks her why she wears the hijab, as she's "too pretty" to cover up her features. The Muslimah politely but firmly explains that she wears the hijab as a personal choice--she likes the way she feels in it, and it connects her to a heritage she's proud of. The woman walks away, and the young man, after some deliberation, follows her to her mosque and waits outside for her. But when she emerges, she's with her traditionally-dressed grandfather, who seems intimidating... until the first man actually talks to him. The grandfather is glad to hear that the man is studying history, and brags about his own granddaughter's focus on journalism and how she plans to tell stories about Paris from her unique perspective. He then invites the young man for tea, and the three chat as they walk off together to enjoy the meal. It's {{Anvilicious}}, on the nose, yes, but it's also a ''much'' needed reminder about the everyday reality of living in a mixed community, and how simple communication, abandoning stereotypes, and getting to know one another are the keys to making those communities healthy and building bridges between people.


* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: "Quais de Seine," made by the husband-and-wife team behind ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', is about the relationship between the ethnic French and the growing Muslim community in Paris. Some young Caucasian Frenchmen tease people as they walk by; when a Muslim woman about their age appears, they mock her and even try pulling off her hijab. A few minutes later, one of the young men approaches the woman to apologize. There's some playful banter between them, and he asks her why she wears the hijab, as she's "too pretty" to cover up her features. The Muslimah politely but firmly explains that she wears the hijab as a personal choice--she likes the way she feels in it, and it connects her to a heritage she's proud of. The woman walks away, and the young man, after some deliberation, follows her to her mosque and waits outside for her. But when she emerges, she's with her traditionally-dressed father, who seems intimidating...until the first man actually talks to him. The father is glad to hear that the man is studying history, and brags about his own daughter's focus on journalism and how she plans to tell stories about Paris from her unique perspective. He then invites the young man for tea, and the three chat as they walk off together to enjoy the meal. It's {{Anvilicious}}, yes, but it's also a ''much'' needed reminder about the everyday reality of living in a mixed community, and how simple communication, abandoning stereotypes, and getting to know one another are the keys to making those communities healthy and building bridges between people.

to:

* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: "Quais de Seine," made by the husband-and-wife team behind ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', is about the relationship between the ethnic French and the growing Muslim community in Paris. Some young Caucasian Frenchmen tease people as they walk by; when a Muslim woman about their age appears, they mock her and even try pulling off her hijab. A few minutes later, one of the young men approaches the woman to apologize. There's some playful banter between them, and he asks her why she wears the hijab, as she's "too pretty" to cover up her features. The Muslimah politely but firmly explains that she wears the hijab as a personal choice--she likes the way she feels in it, and it connects her to a heritage she's proud of. The woman walks away, and the young man, after some deliberation, follows her to her mosque and waits outside for her. But when she emerges, she's with her traditionally-dressed father, grandfather, who seems intimidating...intimidating... until the first man actually talks to him. The father grandfather is glad to hear that the man is studying history, and brags about his own daughter's granddaughter's focus on journalism and how she plans to tell stories about Paris from her unique perspective. He then invites the young man for tea, and the three chat as they walk off together to enjoy the meal. It's {{Anvilicious}}, yes, but it's also a ''much'' needed reminder about the everyday reality of living in a mixed community, and how simple communication, abandoning stereotypes, and getting to know one another are the keys to making those communities healthy and building bridges between people.


* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: One of the shorts in the film, made by the husband-and-wife team behind ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', is about the relationship between the ethnic French and the growing Muslim community in Paris. A few teenage/college aged boys make fun of a hijabi and try pulling off her headscarf. One of the boys with them lingers to apologize. She's beautiful and intelligent, and they hit it off. [[spoiler: He tentatively asks her about her hijab and she explains that it was her choice, it's a reminder of her faith and it makes her feel good. At one point he vists at her house, and her scary male relative is there - oh no! But he's happy to meet the boy and invites him to go for a walk with them, all three together. The movie fades out as the older man makes small talk, full of pride, about the student project she's working on: stories about Paris, but about her own Paris ... ]] Anvilicious? Yes. Sweet, touching, and a refreshingly honest look at the fears non-Muslims have built up around Muslims, as well as what you generally get if you bother to actually talk to a Muslimah? Definitely yes.

to:

* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: One of the shorts in the film, "Quais de Seine," made by the husband-and-wife team behind ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', is about the relationship between the ethnic French and the growing Muslim community in Paris. A few teenage/college aged boys make fun of Some young Caucasian Frenchmen tease people as they walk by; when a hijabi Muslim woman about their age appears, they mock her and even try pulling off her headscarf. One hijab. A few minutes later, one of the boys with them lingers young men approaches the woman to apologize. She's beautiful There's some playful banter between them, and intelligent, and they hit it off. [[spoiler: He tentatively he asks her about why she wears the hijab, as she's "too pretty" to cover up her hijab and she features. The Muslimah politely but firmly explains that it was her choice, it's she wears the hijab as a reminder of her faith personal choice--she likes the way she feels in it, and it makes connects her feel good. At one point he vists at her house, and her scary male relative is there - oh no! But he's happy to meet the boy and invites him to go for a walk with them, all three together. The movie fades out as the older man makes small talk, full of pride, about the student project heritage she's working on: proud of. The woman walks away, and the young man, after some deliberation, follows her to her mosque and waits outside for her. But when she emerges, she's with her traditionally-dressed father, who seems intimidating...until the first man actually talks to him. The father is glad to hear that the man is studying history, and brags about his own daughter's focus on journalism and how she plans to tell stories about Paris, Paris from her unique perspective. He then invites the young man for tea, and the three chat as they walk off together to enjoy the meal. It's {{Anvilicious}}, yes, but it's also a ''much'' needed reminder about her own Paris ... ]] Anvilicious? Yes. Sweet, touching, the everyday reality of living in a mixed community, and a refreshingly honest look at how simple communication, abandoning stereotypes, and getting to know one another are the fears non-Muslims have built up around Muslims, as well as what you generally get if you bother keys to actually talk to a Muslimah? Definitely yes.making those communities healthy and building bridges between people.

Added DiffLines:

* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: One of the shorts in the film, made by the husband-and-wife team behind ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', is about the relationship between the ethnic French and the growing Muslim community in Paris. A few teenage/college aged boys make fun of a hijabi and try pulling off her headscarf. One of the boys with them lingers to apologize. She's beautiful and intelligent, and they hit it off. [[spoiler: He tentatively asks her about her hijab and she explains that it was her choice, it's a reminder of her faith and it makes her feel good. At one point he vists at her house, and her scary male relative is there - oh no! But he's happy to meet the boy and invites him to go for a walk with them, all three together. The movie fades out as the older man makes small talk, full of pride, about the student project she's working on: stories about Paris, but about her own Paris ... ]] Anvilicious? Yes. Sweet, touching, and a refreshingly honest look at the fears non-Muslims have built up around Muslims, as well as what you generally get if you bother to actually talk to a Muslimah? Definitely yes.

Showing 4 edit(s) of 4

Top