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* HilariousInHindsight: This episode is a "[[Series/TheSarahConnorChronicles Sarah Connor]] vs [[Film/TerminatorGenisys Sarah Connor]]" showdown.


* IdiotPlot: Varys's plan to assassinate Daenerys at this juncture makes no sense. Cersei hasn't been defeated or King's Landing taken yet, and the major part of Daenerys's forces are loyal to her personally and will not follow Jon as the next person in line for the Iron Throne unless they (and he) can be convinced that she was not killed by Varys and to take up the fight against Cersei in her name, which they would have be very gullible to fall for. There is a very high risk of unleashing two uncontrolled armies and one uncontrolled dragon on the Seven Kingdoms to pillage and burn. Varys has had no assurance of a place for himself in Jon's court or that Jon would accept the throne even if the lords of Westeros rallied for him. The northern lords would support Jon, but the southern ones have no reason to believe Varys's letters about his identity and would be likely to see it as a Northern power grab. And if Jon learned that Varys was responsible for Daenerys's death, he would execute him. In short, this is an unrealistic plan for a character who is supposed to be both clever and a master of self-preservation, and is contrived so that Daenerys can slide further down the slipper slope due to Varys's betrayal.

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* IdiotPlot: Varys's plan to assassinate Daenerys at this juncture makes no sense. Cersei hasn't been defeated or King's Landing taken yet, and the major part of Daenerys's forces are loyal to her personally and will not follow Jon as the next person in line for the Iron Throne unless they (and he) can be convinced that she was not killed by Varys and to take up the fight against Cersei in her name, which they would have be very gullible to fall for. There is a very high risk of unleashing two uncontrolled armies and one ''one uncontrolled dragon dragon'' on the Seven Kingdoms to pillage and burn. Varys has had no assurance of a place for himself in Jon's court or that Jon would accept the throne even if the lords of Westeros rallied for him. The northern lords would support Jon, but the southern ones have no reason to believe Varys's letters about his identity and would be likely to see it as a Northern power grab. And if Jon learned that Varys was responsible for Daenerys's death, he would execute him. In short, this is an unrealistic plan for a character who is supposed to be both clever and a master of self-preservation, and is contrived so that Daenerys can slide further down the slipper slope due to Varys's betrayal.


* IdiotPlot: Varys's plan to assassinate Daenerys at this juncture makes no sense. Cersei hasn't been defeated or King's Landing taken yet, and the major part of Daenerys's forces are loyal to her personally and will not follow Jon as the next person in line for the Iron Throne unless they, and he, can be convinced that she was not killed by Varys and to take up the fight against Cersei in her name, which they would have be very gullible to fall for. There is a very high risk of unleashing two uncontrolled armies and one uncontrolled dragon on the Seven Kingdoms to pillage and burn. Varys has had no assurance of a place for himself in Jon's court or that Jon would accept the throne even if the lords of Westeros rallied for him. The northern lords would support Jon, but the southern ones have no reason to believe Varys's letters about his identity and would be likely to see it as a Northern power grab. And if Jon learned that Varys was responsible for Daenerys's death, he would execute him. In short, this is an unrealistic plan for a character who is supposed to be both clever and a master of self-preservation, and is contrived so that Daenerys can slide further down the slipper slope due to Varys's betrayal.

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* IdiotPlot: Varys's plan to assassinate Daenerys at this juncture makes no sense. Cersei hasn't been defeated or King's Landing taken yet, and the major part of Daenerys's forces are loyal to her personally and will not follow Jon as the next person in line for the Iron Throne unless they, and he, they (and he) can be convinced that she was not killed by Varys and to take up the fight against Cersei in her name, which they would have be very gullible to fall for. There is a very high risk of unleashing two uncontrolled armies and one uncontrolled dragon on the Seven Kingdoms to pillage and burn. Varys has had no assurance of a place for himself in Jon's court or that Jon would accept the throne even if the lords of Westeros rallied for him. The northern lords would support Jon, but the southern ones have no reason to believe Varys's letters about his identity and would be likely to see it as a Northern power grab. And if Jon learned that Varys was responsible for Daenerys's death, he would execute him. In short, this is an unrealistic plan for a character who is supposed to be both clever and a master of self-preservation, and is contrived so that Daenerys can slide further down the slipper slope due to Varys's betrayal.

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* IdiotPlot: Varys's plan to assassinate Daenerys at this juncture makes no sense. Cersei hasn't been defeated or King's Landing taken yet, and the major part of Daenerys's forces are loyal to her personally and will not follow Jon as the next person in line for the Iron Throne unless they, and he, can be convinced that she was not killed by Varys and to take up the fight against Cersei in her name, which they would have be very gullible to fall for. There is a very high risk of unleashing two uncontrolled armies and one uncontrolled dragon on the Seven Kingdoms to pillage and burn. Varys has had no assurance of a place for himself in Jon's court or that Jon would accept the throne even if the lords of Westeros rallied for him. The northern lords would support Jon, but the southern ones have no reason to believe Varys's letters about his identity and would be likely to see it as a Northern power grab. And if Jon learned that Varys was responsible for Daenerys's death, he would execute him. In short, this is an unrealistic plan for a character who is supposed to be both clever and a master of self-preservation, and is contrived so that Daenerys can slide further down the slipper slope due to Varys's betrayal.


* HarsherInHindsight:
** Real-world example. [[BabyNameTrendStarter "Daenerys" and "Khaleesi" became somewhat popular girls' names as a result of the show]]. This was at its peak while Daenerys was seen as an example of female empowerment, as she was fighting abusive men in her life, creating a power base out of nothing, and destroying institutionalized slavery and freeing people in an entire region. Now that she carpet bombed an entire civilian population because she felt like it, that name may not seem like such a good idea. To quote [[https://www.vox.com/culture/2019/5/13/18617316/game-of-thrones-season-8-episode-5-recap-the-bells-winners-losers Vox's Emily VanDerWerff:]]
---> Every year since ''Game of Thrones'' debuted in 2011, we’ve heard about how many ''Game of Thrones'' baby names there are, and every year, I think, “Boy, shouldn’t you wait for the show to end?” This is why, people. This is why.
** Dany's conduct as she swept across Essos, burning slavers and enemies but freeing slaves and sparing women and children, is this as well now that it's come to fruition. She does plenty of burning... and very little sparing, even of innocents. It's hard to believe that this is the same woman who was willing to risk her life and those of her forces to save the North from the Night King. The woman who would have risked losing the Iron Throne to save all life in Westeros is now in a position to finish what the Night King started.
** Back in Season 2, Dany threatens the Spice King and the Thirteen of Qarth by declaring that she would take back what was stolen, destroy those who wronged her, lay waste on armies, and burn cities to the ground. Now, everything she had said before has come true.
** On a grander scale, absolutely ''every'' time throughout the series any character has had any doubts about Daenerys's fitness to rule, or worried that she may take after her father, turned out to be ''absolutely right'' based on the events of this episode while everyone who believed Daenerys would be a good, just, and kind ruler turned out to be ''wrong.'' Barristan Selmy, Jorah, and Missandei all lived and died for her because they believed in her, only for Dany to turn out to be a tyrannical conqueror and mass murderer after all.
** Daenerys acknowledged in her first meeting with Jon that her father was an evil man, and that children shouldn't be blamed for the crimes of their parents. Now she has ''exceeded'' her father in villainy. The Mad King wanted to blow up King's Landing with wildfire to prevent Robert Baratheon from seizing the throne from him. As monstrous as it was, it had its own twisted logic as a last-ditch defensive move. Daenerys doesn't even have that excuse; she chooses to burn an already ''surrendered'' King's Landing down to the ground out of nothing more than a glorified temper tantrum. Add the fact that the Mad King had been visibly unhinged for years before he came up with the wildfire scheme while Dany has been over the edge for barely a week, and Dany comes out looking even worse than before.
** Robert ''the feckless drunkard king'' Baratheon was the first to predict that Daenerys would be a nightmare to Westeros while traveling with Ned Stark. And just like his uncle Ned, Jon Snow failed to see the danger until it was too late. Things would have turned out better for ''everyone'' if Robert had continued sending assassins rather than being talked out of it by Ned. By extension, Barristan and Jorah saving her from the attempts that actually did get launched indirectly makes them responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians (and that's just in Westeros).
*** And Joffrey "Vicious Idiot King" Lannister was the second, only to be shot down by Tywin in a petty battle of dominance. [[JerkassHasAPoint Jerkasses Had a Point]] indeed!
** WordOfGod is that were it not for the grief and anger at her personal losses and betrayals leading up to the battle, Daenerys would have accepted the city's surrender. And the episode demonstrates that Daenerys and her forces were perfectly capable of taking the city with minimal collateral damage and civilian casualties before her madness took hold, and this is with only one dragon and severely depleted numbers. With all this in mind, had Tyrion not tried to talk Daenerys out of attacking earlier, something he did out a desire to save lives, tens of thousands would have been spared the fire.



* HilariousInHindsight:
** This episode confirmed Jaime goes back to Cersei without any ulterior motives fans suspected he was hiding last episode because he [[https://youtu.be/u8K9XuPrXko?t=4m59s "has an addiction to her,"]] despite caring for and sleeping with Brienne. In other words, [[Recap/GameOfThronesS5E10MothersMercy Jaime wants a good girl, but he needs the bad pussy.]]
** The episode proves King Stannis right, when he was skeptical towards hiring the Golden Company in Season 4 Episode 3.


** Cleganebowl, while satisfying in itself, turned out completely extraneous narratively and thematically. There were no stakes in it, and its outcome didn't affect anything in the slightest. Whoever came out victorious was doomed anyway; Gregor was, for all intents and purposes, just another wight, whose comeuppance for any past atrocities had already been delivered years ago by Oberyn; and Sandor has resigned to die, turning the supposed UltimateShowdownOfUltimateDestiny into a glorified MurderSuicide for the man who'd failed to get over his past. Even if that was [[IntendedAudienceReaction the point]], it doesn’t excuse Gregor [[SmartBall suddenly regaining his personality and antipathy for his brother with no explanation]] in time for the fight, especially when he had shown no awareness the last time they faced one another.

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** Cleganebowl, while satisfying in itself, The long-awaited Cleganebowl turned out to be completely extraneous narratively and thematically. There were no stakes in it, and its outcome didn't affect anything in the slightest. Whoever came out victorious was doomed anyway; Gregor was, for all intents and purposes, just another wight, whose comeuppance for any past atrocities had already been delivered years ago by Oberyn; and Sandor has resigned to die, turning the supposed UltimateShowdownOfUltimateDestiny into a glorified MurderSuicide for the man who'd failed to get over his past. Even if that was [[IntendedAudienceReaction the point]], it doesn’t excuse Gregor [[SmartBall suddenly regaining his personality and antipathy for his brother with no explanation]] in time for the fight, especially when he had shown no awareness the last time they faced one another.


** Seeing Jaime get beaten by Euron and eventually die after his RedemptionRejection in the last episode.


** Jaime's comment about not caring whether the people of King's Landing live or die. A piss-poor continuity error forced to justify Jaime's last minute rejection of redemption? Or Jaime admitting that while he was against the Mad King burning the people alive and stopped it from happening, he still held the commoners in King's Landing with contempt one finds from the upper-class and that Daenerys's recent losses of her dragons making him think that his sister's forces did indeed have a chance to fight off Daenerys and suffer only minor casualties?

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** Jaime's comment about not caring whether the people of King's Landing live or die. A piss-poor continuity error forced to justify Jaime's last minute rejection of redemption? Or Jaime admitting that while he was against the Mad King burning the people alive and stopped it from happening, he still held the commoners in King's Landing with the contempt one finds from the upper-class and that Daenerys's recent losses of her dragons making him think that his sister's forces did indeed have a chance to fight off Daenerys and suffer only minor casualties?


* DarknessInducedAudienceApathy: Everything that happens after the first twenty or thirty minutes is so relentlessly dark and violent even by the standards of this show, with thousands of innocent people getting needlessly slaughtered, Dany's abrupt turn to genocidal villainy, and quite a few sympathetic characters being killed off or getting traumatized by the horrors they witness, that it can become rather difficult [[EightDeadlyWords to care what happens to anyone]]. It even turns out that the Northern soldiers who we were supposed to be rooting for the whole time were apparently just lacking the opportunity to go on a massive rape and murder spree.

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* DarknessInducedAudienceApathy: Everything that happens after the first twenty or thirty minutes is so relentlessly dark and violent even by the standards of this show, with thousands of innocent people getting needlessly slaughtered, Dany's fairly abrupt turn to genocidal villainy, and quite a few sympathetic characters being killed off or getting traumatized by the horrors they witness, that it can become rather difficult [[EightDeadlyWords to care what happens to anyone]]. It even turns out that the Northern soldiers who we were supposed to be rooting for the whole time were apparently just lacking the opportunity to go on a massive rape and murder spree. Likely an IntendedAudienceReaction as the characters (Particularly [[AudienceSurrogate Jon and Tyrion]]) themselves are visibly disturbed and stunned by this turn of events.

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*** And Joffrey "Vicious Idiot King" Lannister was the second, only to be shot down by Tywin in a petty battle of dominance. [[JerkassHasAPoint Jerkasses Had a Point]] indeed!


** Tyrion's obsession with ending the war between Cersei and Daenerys peacefully. Does he truly want to protect his family, even if it means he will be killed by Daenerys for disobeying her desire to kill her? Is he only motivated by the fact that Cersei is pregnant and trying to protect the unborn child she is carrying. Or is he truly concerned of the implications for a potential Daenerys reign if she massacres soldiers and innocents to take the throne? The episode demonstrates that Daenerys was perfectly capable of taking the city with few, if any civilian casualties, she simply chose to continue the destruction even after the city had surrendered. Did Tyrion simply underestimate Dany, Drogon, and their army's ability to do take the city so cleanly? Or did he think that there was a possibility that she would take things too far even before the deterioration of her mental state due to the losses of Jorah, Missandei, two of her dragons, and the breakdown of her relationship with Jon? That even if she was perfectly capable of taking the city with minimal bloodshed, there was always the chance she'd choose not to?

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** Tyrion's obsession with ending the war between Cersei and Daenerys peacefully. Does he truly want to protect his family, even if it means he will be killed by Daenerys for disobeying her desire to kill her? Is he only motivated by the fact that Cersei is pregnant and trying to protect the unborn child she is carrying. carrying? Or is he truly concerned of the implications for a potential Daenerys reign if she massacres soldiers and innocents to take the throne? The episode demonstrates that Daenerys was perfectly capable of taking the city with few, if any civilian casualties, she simply chose to continue the destruction even after the city had surrendered. Did Tyrion simply underestimate Dany, Drogon, and their army's ability to do take the city so cleanly? Or did he think that there was a possibility that she would take things too far even before the deterioration of her mental state due to the losses of Jorah, Missandei, two of her dragons, and the breakdown of her relationship with Jon? That even if she was perfectly capable of taking the city with minimal bloodshed, there was always the chance she'd choose not to?



** There is no in-universe precedence of tolling the city bells to signal surrender despite it being treated like a commonly known custom in the episode. Back in [[Recap/GameOfThronesS2E9Blackwater S02E09]] Ser Davos, who grew up in King's Landing and participated in the siege of Storm's End, even said to his son: "I've never known bells to mean surrender."[[labelnote:From the books]]The established conventions in the books and the series lore are that bells were tolled ''before'' battle to man the walls (Battle of Blackwater) or to warn smallfolk of incoming danger ([[https://awoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/Battle_of_the_Bells Battle of the Bells]]), ''not'' to surrender. The only established convention for surrender is "bending the knee", i.e. a defeated lord kneels to the commander on the opposite side as a sign of defeat, either in person or as a formality on paper. As per the established rules, the legitimate gesture of surrender is Cersei bending the knee to Daenerys and nothing less than that would have sufficed[[/labelnote]]

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** There is no in-universe precedence of tolling the city bells to signal surrender despite it being treated like a commonly known custom in the episode. Back in [[Recap/GameOfThronesS2E9Blackwater S02E09]] "Blackwater"]] Ser Davos, who grew up in King's Landing and participated in the siege of Storm's End, even said to his son: "I've never known bells to mean surrender."[[labelnote:From the books]]The established conventions in the books and the series lore are that bells were tolled ''before'' battle to man the walls (Battle of Blackwater) or to warn smallfolk of incoming danger ([[https://awoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/Battle_of_the_Bells Battle of the Bells]]), ''not'' to surrender. The only established convention for surrender is "bending the knee", i.e. a defeated lord kneels to the commander on the opposite side as a sign of defeat, either in person or as a formality on paper. As per the established rules, the legitimate gesture of surrender is Cersei bending the knee to Daenerys and nothing less than that would have sufficed[[/labelnote]]



** Real-world example. [[BabyNameTrendStarter "Daenerys" and "Khaleesi" became somewhat popular girls' names as a result of the show]]. This was at its peak while Daenerys was seen as an example of female empowerment, as she was fighting abusive men in her life, creating a power base out of nothing, and destroying institutionalized slavery and freeing people in an entire region. Now that she carpet bombed an entire civilian population because she felt like it, that name may not seem like such a good idea. To quote [[https://www.vox.com/culture/2019/5/13/18617316/game-of-thrones-season-8-episode-5-recap-the-bells-winners-losers Vox's Todd VanDerWerff:]]

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** Real-world example. [[BabyNameTrendStarter "Daenerys" and "Khaleesi" became somewhat popular girls' names as a result of the show]]. This was at its peak while Daenerys was seen as an example of female empowerment, as she was fighting abusive men in her life, creating a power base out of nothing, and destroying institutionalized slavery and freeing people in an entire region. Now that she carpet bombed an entire civilian population because she felt like it, that name may not seem like such a good idea. To quote [[https://www.vox.com/culture/2019/5/13/18617316/game-of-thrones-season-8-episode-5-recap-the-bells-winners-losers Vox's Todd Emily VanDerWerff:]]



** Jaime could count too. The episode highlights his TragicVillain trait of "not being able to let go of Cersei" for the final time, but considering he [[RedemptionRejection blatantly rejected]] a chance to start over with an unambiguously much better woman, it's hard to feel sorry that he died (or got beaten up by Euron beforehand).

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** Jaime could count too. The episode highlights his TragicVillain trait of "not being able to let go of Cersei" for the final time, but considering he [[RedemptionRejection blatantly rejected]] a chance to start over with an unambiguously much better woman, it's hard to feel sorry that he died (or (and got beaten up by Euron beforehand).


* InternetBackdraft:
** Daenerys as the Mad Queen, which has been criticised as OutOfCharacter by some and in-character but poorly executed by others. Issues with the development include the rushed nature of Dany's mental breakdown, the sexist implications of Dany and Cersei's madness compared to Jon's CharacterShilling, and the actions of other characters (Sansa, Jon, Varys, Tyrion) making Dany's breakdown more sympathetic than intended.
** The resolution of the Jaime/Cersei subplot. Jaime's decision to die with Cersei was seen as a destruction of his character development (shunning his healthy relationship with Brienne, and claiming he doesn't care for the smallfolk), and Cersei dying in Jaime's arms was seen as unsatisfying for a character that has caused so much destruction.


** The Northern soldiers cross it too when they ignore Jon's commands to stop attacking. Special props to the soldier who has abducted a woman right in front of Jon Snow, his rightful commander (and King) and attempts to ''kill'' Jon when Jon intervenes to prevent the soldier from having his way with her.

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** The Northern soldiers cross it too when they ignore Jon's commands to stop attacking. Special props to the soldier who has abducted a woman right in front of Jon Snow, his rightful commander (and King) King), and attempts to ''kill'' Jon when Jon intervenes to prevent the soldier from having his way with her.

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*** Alternatively, there are several reasons other than outright madness that her decision making abilities might have been compromised. She's mourning the deaths of her two best friends, hasn't eaten for days, is severely sleep deprived, and on top of it she's suffering serious romantic and sexual frustration.

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