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* FridgeBrilliance: As discussed in-game, Elle thinks that the original hero accepted Dragonlord's offer just to see what happened if he said, "Yes." That means the whole game happened because the hero basically wanted to see if Dragonlord would invoke ButThouMust.

to:

* FridgeBrilliance: FridgeBrilliance:
**
As discussed in-game, Elle thinks that the original hero accepted Dragonlord's offer just to see what happened if he said, "Yes." That means the whole game happened because the hero basically wanted to see if Dragonlord would invoke ButThouMust.



* LesYay: The first settler, Pippa, makes a few suggestive remarks no matter what the gender of the Builder is:
-->'''Pippa:''' If we had two beds, we could sleep next to each other!

to:

* LesYay: LesYay:
**
The first settler, Pippa, makes a few suggestive remarks no matter what the gender of the Builder is:
-->'''Pippa:''' --->'''Pippa:''' If we had two beds, we could sleep next to each other!



* {{Narm}}: Should the player decide to accept the challenge to defeat Dragonlord without Erdrick's Armor, the celebration at Tantagel after Dragonlord is defeated is hard to take seriously given the Builder had all of their gear stripped, leaving them to celebrate and greet everyone in only their underwear.

to:

* {{Narm}}: Should the player decide to accept the challenge to defeat Dragonlord without Erdrick's Armor, the celebration at Tantagel Tantegel after Dragonlord is defeated is hard to take seriously given the Builder had all of their gear stripped, leaving them to celebrate and greet everyone in only their underwear.


* FridgeBrilliance: As discussed in-game, Elle thinks that the original hero accepted Dragonlord's offer just to see what happened if he said, "Yes." That means the whole game happened because the hero basically wanted to see if Dragonlord would invoke ButThouMust
** In all of the flashbacks to the original game, the POV character refuses everything the [=NPC=]s suggest: They buy an axe but do not equip it and they refuse the puff-puff. If these dreams are the memories of the fallen hero, his possibly foreshadows their drive to do the opposite choice by taking the Dragon Lord's offer. They've been a contrarian the entire time!

to:

* FridgeBrilliance: As discussed in-game, Elle thinks that the original hero accepted Dragonlord's offer just to see what happened if he said, "Yes." That means the whole game happened because the hero basically wanted to see if Dragonlord would invoke ButThouMust
ButThouMust.
** In all of the flashbacks to the original game, the POV character refuses everything the [=NPC=]s suggest: They buy an axe but do not equip it and they refuse the puff-puff. If these dreams are the memories of the fallen hero, his this possibly foreshadows their drive to do the opposite choice by taking the Dragon Lord's offer. They've been a contrarian the entire time!



* NightmareFuel: On an intellectual level, the core premise of the game. After the Hero of Dragon Quest 1 accepted the Dragonlord's offer, the Dragonlord then covered the world in darkness... and also took away humanity's knowledge and power to create in the process. This doesn't sound scary until you find out what taking away that power actually means: it means not being able to read and write, not being able to make shelter, not being able to make food or tools, among many other things. People in-game don't understand how the Builder is making objects and tools, even while directly observing what the Builder is doing. The Dragonlord, in one stroke, turned every human in the world into an cave-dwelling animal that can't comprehend complex ideas and are accordingly incapable of ever rising up, while still being aware enough that they know that something is terribly wrong but can't even realize what they're missing.

to:

* NightmareFuel: On an intellectual level, the core premise of the game. After the Hero of Dragon ''Dragon Quest 1 1'' accepted the Dragonlord's offer, the Dragonlord then covered the world in darkness... and also took away humanity's knowledge and power to create in the process. This doesn't sound scary until you find out what taking away that power actually means: it means not being able to read and write, not being able to make shelter, not being able to make food or tools, among many other things. People in-game don't understand how the Builder is making objects and tools, even while directly observing what the Builder is doing. The Dragonlord, in one stroke, turned every human in the world into an cave-dwelling animal that can't comprehend complex ideas and are accordingly incapable of ever rising up, while still being aware enough that they know that something is terribly wrong but can't even realize what they're missing.


* FauxSymbolism: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]

to:

* FauxSymbolism: The final chapter has a fair amount of [[Literature/TheBible New Testament Testament]] symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]


* {{Narm}}: The celebration at Tantagel after Dragonlord is defeated is hard to take seriously given the Builder had all of their gear stripped, leaving them to celebrate and greet everyone in only their underwear.

to:

* {{Narm}}: The Should the player decide to accept the challenge to defeat Dragonlord without Erdrick's Armor, the celebration at Tantagel after Dragonlord is defeated is hard to take seriously given the Builder had all of their gear stripped, leaving them to celebrate and greet everyone in only their underwear.


* DemonicSpiders: The game likes to throw some of these at the player as part of clearing optional challenges in a few chapters. The Green Dragons in Chapter 1 and Boss Trolls/Gigantes in Chapter 3 especially. Without proper gear, they will wreck you.
* FauxSymbolism: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]



** In all of the flashbacks to the original game, the POV character refuses everything the npcs suggest: They buy an axe but do not equip it and they refuse the puff-puff. If these dreams are the memories of the fallen hero, his possibly foreshadows their drive to do the opposite choice by taking the Dragon Lord's offer. They've been a contrarian the entire time!
* DemonicSpiders: The game likes to throw some of these at the player as part of clearing optional challenges in a few chapters. The Green Dragons in Chapter 1 and Boss Trolls/Gigantes in Chapter 3 especially. Without proper gear, they will wreck you.
* ExecutiveMeddling: Not as ''actively'' as in most instances, but definitely present when speaking of [[spoiler: the Fallen Hero's appearance. If one wonders why the team went with a Hoodie instead of a corrupted version of the DQI Hero's original look, it's because they ''couldn't.'' There's a strict mandate in place regarding the Heroes of the series across the board: namely, their likeness is off-limits. Even an in-house crossover with Square-Enix like ''Itadaki Street'' isn't exempt from this rule, using only supporting DQ cast members. To date, only '''one''' title in gaming has gotten a special exemption from this, [[VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate and it by no means is a small one.]]]]
* FauxSymbolism: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]

to:

** In all of the flashbacks to the original game, the POV character refuses everything the npcs [=NPC=]s suggest: They buy an axe but do not equip it and they refuse the puff-puff. If these dreams are the memories of the fallen hero, his possibly foreshadows their drive to do the opposite choice by taking the Dragon Lord's offer. They've been a contrarian the entire time!
* DemonicSpiders: The game likes to throw some of these at the player as part of clearing optional challenges in a few chapters. The Green Dragons in Chapter 1 and Boss Trolls/Gigantes in Chapter 3 especially. Without proper gear, they will wreck you.
* ExecutiveMeddling: Not as ''actively'' as in most instances, but definitely present when speaking of [[spoiler: the Fallen Hero's appearance. If one wonders why the team went with a Hoodie instead of a corrupted version of the DQI Hero's original look, it's because they ''couldn't.'' There's a strict mandate in place regarding the Heroes of the series across the board: namely, their likeness is off-limits. Even an in-house crossover with Square-Enix like ''Itadaki Street'' isn't exempt from this rule, using only supporting DQ cast members. To date, only '''one''' title in gaming has gotten a special exemption from this, [[VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate and it by no means is a small one.]]]]
* FauxSymbolism: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]
time!



* GodIsInept: In the beginning of the game, the goddess Rubiss tries to inform the Builder what their role is, but eventually opts to just let them have at it and keep them in the dark. You're lead to believe your efforts are for the ultimate goal of saving humanity from the Dragonlord, right? ''Nope.'' [[ArcWords You are not a Hero.]] Turns out, Rubiss is ''really'' dead-set on having her fairytale succeed. ''Whether that takes decades or centuries.'' It was never about saving the scores of innocent, ''horrifically''-suffering lives, but just setting the stage for a do-over. Your friends and loved ones made, all to be left at a ''very'' now alert and irate Dragonlord's lack of mercy, and Rubiss tries to refuse even the right to ''protect them,'' all because it's not the role she ''allowed.'' Cue the Builder [[LetsGetDangerous going hardline]] ScrewDestiny.
** Fortunately this ends up being [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] later on; Rubiss realizes the error of her ways and when the Builder is struggling beating the Dragonlord, she summons all the friends the Builder has made to help them!



* PolishedPort: The Switch port, like all good ones, is basically the full game, and plays the same as the original, but on the go.



* PolishedPort: The Switch port, like all good ones, is basically the full game, and plays the same as the original, but on the go.



** It's important to note that there's a ''reason'' this couldn't be helped. See ExecutiveMeddling above.


** In all of the flashbacks to the original game, the POV character refuses everything the NPCs suggest. They buy an axe but do not equip it, they refuse the puff-puff. This possibly foreshadows the fallen hero doing the opposite choice by taking the Dragon Lord's offer

to:

** In all of the flashbacks to the original game, the POV character refuses everything the NPCs suggest. npcs suggest: They buy an axe but do not equip it, it and they refuse the puff-puff. This If these dreams are the memories of the fallen hero, his possibly foreshadows the fallen hero doing their drive to do the opposite choice by taking the Dragon Lord's offer offer. They've been a contrarian the entire time!

Added DiffLines:

** In all of the flashbacks to the original game, the POV character refuses everything the NPCs suggest. They buy an axe but do not equip it, they refuse the puff-puff. This possibly foreshadows the fallen hero doing the opposite choice by taking the Dragon Lord's offer

Added DiffLines:

* ExecutiveMeddling: Not as ''actively'' as in most instances, but definitely present when speaking of [[spoiler: the Fallen Hero's appearance. If one wonders why the team went with a Hoodie instead of a corrupted version of the DQI Hero's original look, it's because they ''couldn't.'' There's a strict mandate in place regarding the Heroes of the series across the board: namely, their likeness is off-limits. Even an in-house crossover with Square-Enix like ''Itadaki Street'' isn't exempt from this rule, using only supporting DQ cast members. To date, only '''one''' title in gaming has gotten a special exemption from this, [[VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate and it by no means is a small one.]]]]


Added DiffLines:

** It's important to note that there's a ''reason'' this couldn't be helped. See ExecutiveMeddling above.

Added DiffLines:

** Fortunately this ends up being [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] later on; Rubiss realizes the error of her ways and when the Builder is struggling beating the Dragonlord, she summons all the friends the Builder has made to help them!


GodIsInept: In the beginning of the game, the goddess Rubiss tries to inform the Builder what their role is, but eventually opts to just let them have at it and keep them in the dark. You're lead to believe your efforts are for the ultimate goal of saving humanity from the Dragonlord, right? ''Nope.'' [[ArcWords You are not a Hero.]] Turns out, Rubiss is ''really'' dead-set on having her fairytale succeed. ''Whether that takes decades or centuries.'' It was never about saving the scores of innocent, ''horrifically''-suffering lives, but just setting the stage for a do-over. Your friends and loved ones made, all to be left at a ''very'' now alert and irate Dragonlord's lack of mercy, and Rubiss tries to refuse even the right to ''protect them,'' all because it's not the role she ''allowed.'' Cue the Builder [[LetsGetDangerous going hardline]] ScrewDestiny.

to:

* GodIsInept: In the beginning of the game, the goddess Rubiss tries to inform the Builder what their role is, but eventually opts to just let them have at it and keep them in the dark. You're lead to believe your efforts are for the ultimate goal of saving humanity from the Dragonlord, right? ''Nope.'' [[ArcWords You are not a Hero.]] Turns out, Rubiss is ''really'' dead-set on having her fairytale succeed. ''Whether that takes decades or centuries.'' It was never about saving the scores of innocent, ''horrifically''-suffering lives, but just setting the stage for a do-over. Your friends and loved ones made, all to be left at a ''very'' now alert and irate Dragonlord's lack of mercy, and Rubiss tries to refuse even the right to ''protect them,'' all because it's not the role she ''allowed.'' Cue the Builder [[LetsGetDangerous going hardline]] ScrewDestiny.

Added DiffLines:

GodIsInept: In the beginning of the game, the goddess Rubiss tries to inform the Builder what their role is, but eventually opts to just let them have at it and keep them in the dark. You're lead to believe your efforts are for the ultimate goal of saving humanity from the Dragonlord, right? ''Nope.'' [[ArcWords You are not a Hero.]] Turns out, Rubiss is ''really'' dead-set on having her fairytale succeed. ''Whether that takes decades or centuries.'' It was never about saving the scores of innocent, ''horrifically''-suffering lives, but just setting the stage for a do-over. Your friends and loved ones made, all to be left at a ''very'' now alert and irate Dragonlord's lack of mercy, and Rubiss tries to refuse even the right to ''protect them,'' all because it's not the role she ''allowed.'' Cue the Builder [[LetsGetDangerous going hardline]] ScrewDestiny.


** At least one villager will also ask if you and Pippa are sleeping in the same room, and that's just in the first chapter. The female builder seems to have at least one woman in a village that either constantly implies a relationship or villagers start to question it, up to [[spoiler: Princess Gwaelin.]]

to:

** At least one villager will also ask if you and Pippa are sleeping in the same room, and that's just in the first chapter. chapter.
**
The female builder Builder seems to have at least one woman in a village that either constantly implies a relationship or villagers start to question it, up to [[spoiler: Princess Gwaelin.]]Gwaelin]], regardless of the Builder's gender.



* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter: Throughout the game everyone speculates as to why the Hero Alefgard took the Dragonlord's offer. The Builder has dream flashbacks implied to be the memories of the Hero. It all looks like the story is building up to some climactic revelation about the Hero, but when the Builder finally reaches the Hero [[spoiler: he's just a modified Hoodie enemy who spouts nonsense, gets defeated easily, and runs off, never to explain anything.]]

to:

* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter: Throughout the game everyone speculates as to why the Hero of Alefgard took the Dragonlord's offer. The Builder has dream flashbacks implied to be the memories of the Hero. It all looks like the story is building up to some climactic revelation about the Hero, but when the Builder finally reaches the Hero [[spoiler: he's just a modified Hoodie enemy who spouts nonsense, gets defeated easily, and runs off, never to explain anything.]]


* Faux symbolism: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]

to:

* Faux symbolism: FauxSymbolism: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]


!! YMMV tropes in ''Dragon Quest Builders''



* EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]

to:

* EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory: Faux symbolism: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]

Added DiffLines:

* EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory: The final chapter has a fair amount of New Testament symbolism. The Builder is suppose to save everyone from a demonic figure opposing the patron God, gets advice and gifts from three wise people who traveled a long way, is repeatedly called a carpenter by one of the guards, [[spoiler: and dies to save everyone.]]

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