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# ''about something other than a man or men''.[[note]] An addendum some claim is that marriage, babies, or romance are indirectly about men and therefore also fail, whereas some point out there is a big difference between "Isn't married life hard/wonderful!" & "Babies are so cute, I wish I had one!" on the one hand, and "OK, so I think this is how we should go about the Madison property settlement" & "Don't give that medicine to the baby, it'll kill her!" on the other. There is also the problem with politics, and wether talking about a male politician counts or not.[[/note]]

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# ''about something other than a man or men''.[[note]] An addendum some claim is that marriage, babies, or romance are indirectly about men and therefore also fail, whereas some point out there is a big difference between "Isn't married life hard/wonderful!" & "Babies are so cute, I wish I had one!" on the one hand, and "OK, so I think this is how we should go about the Madison property settlement" & "Don't give that medicine to the baby, it'll kill her!" on the other. There is also the problem with politics, and wether whether talking about a male politician counts or not.[[/note]]


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The Bechdel Test[[note]] Bechdel-Wallace Test, or the Mo Movie Measure named after Mo, the main character of ''Dykes to Watch Out For'', even though it was introduced in a one-off strip before Mo was introduced[[/note]] is a litmus test for female presence in fictional media. The test is named for Alison Bechdel, creator of the comic strip ''ComicStrip/DykesToWatchOutFor'', who made it known to the world with [[https://web.archive.org/web/20140216030535/http://www.flickr.com/photos/zizyphus/34585797/ this strip]].

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The Bechdel Test[[note]] AKA Bechdel-Wallace Test, or the Mo Movie Measure named after Mo, the main character of ''Dykes to Watch Out For'', even though it was introduced in a one-off strip before Mo was introduced[[/note]] is a litmus test for female presence in fictional media. The test is named for Alison Bechdel, creator of the comic strip ''ComicStrip/DykesToWatchOutFor'', who made it known to the world with [[https://web.archive.org/web/20140216030535/http://www.flickr.com/photos/zizyphus/34585797/ this strip]].


The Bechdel Test, Bechdel-Wallace Test, or the Mo Movie Measure[[note]] named after Mo, the main character of ''Dykes to Watch Out For'', even though it was introduced in a one-off strip before Mo was introduced[[/note]], is a litmus test for female presence in fictional media. The test is named for Alison Bechdel, creator of the comic strip ''ComicStrip/DykesToWatchOutFor'', who made it known to the world with [[https://web.archive.org/web/20140216030535/http://www.flickr.com/photos/zizyphus/34585797/ this strip]].

to:

The Bechdel Test, Test[[note]] Bechdel-Wallace Test, or the Mo Movie Measure[[note]] Measure named after Mo, the main character of ''Dykes to Watch Out For'', even though it was introduced in a one-off strip before Mo was introduced[[/note]], introduced[[/note]] is a litmus test for female presence in fictional media. The test is named for Alison Bechdel, creator of the comic strip ''ComicStrip/DykesToWatchOutFor'', who made it known to the world with [[https://web.archive.org/web/20140216030535/http://www.flickr.com/photos/zizyphus/34585797/ this strip]].


* Conservative film critic Kyle Smith wrote an [[http://www.nationalreview.com/article/449340/bechdel-test-feminist-litmus-test-movies-useless-political-correctness article]] which criticized the importance of the Bechdel Test and dismissed it as meaningless. Unfortunately, he also (probably unintentionally) insulted female writers, claiming they're solely or mostly focused on romance, that their movie ideas are not commercial enough and implies women have made little or no contribution in the sci-fi/fantasy community. This led to a fair bit of InternetBackdraft and [[http://ew.com/movies/2017/07/10/kyle-smith-slammed-bechdel-test-takedown/ a number]] [[http://www.salon.com/2017/07/11/national-review-bechdel-test/ counter]] [[http://www.tor.com/2017/07/18/sleeps-with-monsters-stop-erasing-womens-presence-in-sff/ articles]] that pointed out how he was wrong on multiple accounts.

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* Conservative film critic Kyle Smith wrote an [[http://www.nationalreview.com/article/449340/bechdel-test-feminist-litmus-test-movies-useless-political-correctness article]] which criticized the importance of the Bechdel Test and dismissed it as meaningless. Unfortunately, he also (probably unintentionally) insulted female writers, claiming they're solely or mostly focused on romance, that their movie ideas are not commercial enough and implies women have made little or no contribution in the sci-fi/fantasy community. This led to a fair bit of InternetBackdraft and [[http://ew.com/movies/2017/07/10/kyle-smith-slammed-bechdel-test-takedown/ a number]] number of]] [[http://www.salon.com/2017/07/11/national-review-bechdel-test/ counter]] [[http://www.tor.com/2017/07/18/sleeps-with-monsters-stop-erasing-womens-presence-in-sff/ articles]] that pointed out how he was wrong on multiple accounts.



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* Conservative film critic Kyle Smith wrote an [[http://www.nationalreview.com/article/449340/bechdel-test-feminist-litmus-test-movies-useless-political-correctness article]] which criticized the importance of the Bechdel Test and dismissed it as meaningless. Unfortunately, he also (probably unintentionally) insulted female writers, claiming they're solely or mostly focused on romance, that their movie ideas are not commercial enough and implies women have made little or no contribution in the sci-fi/fantasy community. This led to a fair bit of InternetBackdraft and [[http://ew.com/movies/2017/07/10/kyle-smith-slammed-bechdel-test-takedown/ a number]] [[http://www.salon.com/2017/07/11/national-review-bechdel-test/ counter]] [[http://www.tor.com/2017/07/18/sleeps-with-monsters-stop-erasing-womens-presence-in-sff/ articles]] that pointed out how he was wrong on multiple accounts.
* Author Creator/JohnCWright criticized the test, pointing out that several pieces of classic literature would not make the cut. At the same time, he seems to misunderstand what the point of the test actually is.


* The film ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' has inspired the "Furiosa Test" ([[https://twitter.com/photopuck/status/607259980631273473 Do any misogynists ban this work?]])
* ''Film/PacificRim'' inspired the "Mako Mori Test" ([[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/the-big-picture/8695-Blecch-Dull-Tests Does a female lead]] get a CharacterArc that doesn't revolve around male characters?). * The "[=MacGyver=] Test", inspired by [[Series/{{MacGyver}} television series of the same name]] that determines the comparative shallowness and stereotypical nature of most male characters in fiction by asking questions like "Does the male protagonist solve problems in creative and intelligent ways, only using violence as an absolute last resort?" It is just as shocking to discover how many films and shows fail ''that'' test as fail the Bechdel Test.

to:

* The "Furiosa Test", inspired by film ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' has inspired ask the "Furiosa Test" ([[https://twitter.question [[https://twitter.com/photopuck/status/607259980631273473 Do any misogynists ban this work?]])
work?]]
* The "Mako Mori Test", inspired by film ''Film/PacificRim'' inspired the "Mako Mori Test" ([[http://www.asks [[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/the-big-picture/8695-Blecch-Dull-Tests Does a female lead]] get a CharacterArc that doesn't revolve around male characters?). characters?
* The "[=MacGyver=] Test", inspired by [[Series/{{MacGyver}} television series of the same name]] that determines the comparative shallowness and stereotypical nature of most male characters in fiction by asking questions like "Does the male protagonist solve problems in creative and intelligent ways, only using violence as an absolute last resort?" It is just as shocking to discover how many films and shows fail ''that'' test as fail the Bechdel Test.

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* The ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series easily passes, especially if you play a female Shepard. Turned on its head in ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'''s "Citadel" DLC, where [=FemShep=] (special forces operator) and Miranda Lawson (spy) struggle to even string two sentences together about more stereotypically feminine topics.


There are lesser-known variations of the test, such as UsefulNotes/DeggansRule (aka Race Bechdel Test), in which two characters of color talk about anything other than the white leads, the [[https://www.glaad.org/sri/2014/vitorusso Vito Russo Test aka gay Bechdel Test]], in which two LGBT characters talk about everything other than straight people, and the Reverse Bechdel Test, [[GenderFlip with the roles of men and women swapped]].[[note]]An estimated 90% of works pass the Reverse Bechdel Test, [[http://www.passthebechdeltest.com/faq according to this link]], which, in comparison to the Bechdel Test, highlights the gender disparity problems.[[/note]] The film ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' has inspired the "Furiosa Test" ([[https://twitter.com/photopuck/status/607259980631273473 Do any misogynists ban this work?]]) and ''Film/PacificRim'' inspired the "Mako Mori Test" ([[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/the-big-picture/8695-Blecch-Dull-Tests Does a female lead]] get a CharacterArc that doesn't revolve around male characters?). And there is even the "[=MacGyver=] Test", inspired by [[Series/{{MacGyver}} television series of the same name]] that determines the comparative shallowness and stereotypical nature of most male characters in fiction by asking questions like "Does the male protagonist solve problems in creative and intelligent ways, only using violence as an absolute last resort?" (It is just as shocking to discover how many films and shows fail ''that'' test as fail the Bechdel Test.)

It's obviously easier for a TV series, especially one with an EnsembleCast, to pass this test than a film, because there's far more time for the conversation to occur in. To compensate for this, Bechdel-inspired analyses of television often look episode-by-episode, giving an final average (such as 7/13 if seven episodes pass in a 13 episode season,) or compare the series' passing Bechdel's Test with its passing a "reverse Bechdel test".

For other tropes regarding the representation of gender in media, see TheSmurfettePrinciple (one female character included strictly for demographic appeal in a work with many male characters, making it impossible to pass rule 1), NeverASelfMadeWoman (a female character is only relevant to the story by her relationship to a man), GenderEqualEnsemble (an EnsembleCast has nearly 50-50 ratio of genders), and ChromosomeCasting (works featuring only male characters or only female, but not both). The prevalence of TokenRomance and RomanticPlotTumor contribute to works failing rule 3 of the test.

to:

There are lesser-known variations of the test, such as test:
*
UsefulNotes/DeggansRule (aka Race Bechdel Test), in which two characters of color talk about anything other than the white leads, the leads.
* The
[[https://www.glaad.org/sri/2014/vitorusso Vito Russo Test aka gay Bechdel Test]], in which two LGBT characters talk about everything other than straight people, and the people.
* The
Reverse Bechdel Test, [[GenderFlip with the roles of men and women swapped]].[[note]]An estimated 90% of works pass the Reverse Bechdel Test, [[http://www.passthebechdeltest.com/faq according to this link]], which, in comparison to the Bechdel Test, highlights the gender disparity problems.[[/note]] [[/note]]
*
The film ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' has inspired the "Furiosa Test" ([[https://twitter.com/photopuck/status/607259980631273473 Do any misogynists ban this work?]]) and work?]])
*
''Film/PacificRim'' inspired the "Mako Mori Test" ([[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/the-big-picture/8695-Blecch-Dull-Tests Does a female lead]] get a CharacterArc that doesn't revolve around male characters?). And there is even the * The "[=MacGyver=] Test", inspired by [[Series/{{MacGyver}} television series of the same name]] that determines the comparative shallowness and stereotypical nature of most male characters in fiction by asking questions like "Does the male protagonist solve problems in creative and intelligent ways, only using violence as an absolute last resort?" (It It is just as shocking to discover how many films and shows fail ''that'' test as fail the Bechdel Test.)

Test.

It's obviously easier for a TV series, especially one with an EnsembleCast, to pass this test than a film, because there's far more time for the conversation to occur in. To compensate for this, Bechdel-inspired analyses of television often look episode-by-episode, giving an final average (such as 7/13 if seven episodes pass in a 13 episode season,) or compare the series' passing Bechdel's Test with its passing a "reverse Bechdel test".

For other tropes regarding the representation of gender in media, see see:
*
TheSmurfettePrinciple (one female character included strictly for demographic appeal in a work with many male characters, making it impossible to pass rule 1), characters)
*
NeverASelfMadeWoman (a female character is only relevant to the story by her relationship to a man), man)
*
GenderEqualEnsemble (an EnsembleCast has nearly 50-50 ratio of genders), and genders)
*
ChromosomeCasting (works featuring only male characters or only female, but not both). The prevalence of TokenRomance and RomanticPlotTumor contribute to works failing rule 3 of the test.both).
* The prevalence of TokenRomance and RomanticPlotTumor contribute to works failing rule 3 of the test.


How well this can be applied to other media is a matter of some debate. It was not designed for other media. For example, a video game or book that follows a male character's point of view will fail by default, as it is impossible for a conversation between females where a male isn't at least observing.


Curious about the pronunciation of Bechdel? [[rhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bechdel_test According]] to Wiki/TheOtherWiki it's like "BEK-dal" (/ˈbɛkdəl/), but Bechdel herself has [[http://www.thereader.ca/2008/07/rhymes-with-rectal-alison-bechdel.html said it rhymes with "rectal"]].[[note]]Cue all the jokes about it being so because to adhere to it is a pain in the ass.[[/note]] Well, they're almost the same, anyhow.

to:

Curious about the pronunciation of Bechdel? [[rhttps://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bechdel_test According]] to Wiki/TheOtherWiki it's like "BEK-dal" (/ˈbɛkdəl/), but Bechdel herself has [[http://www.thereader.ca/2008/07/rhymes-with-rectal-alison-bechdel.html said it rhymes with "rectal"]].[[note]]Cue all the jokes about it being so because to adhere to it is a pain in the ass.[[/note]] Well, they're almost the same, anyhow.


There's nothing necessarily wrong with any film flunking the Bechdel Test. Indeed, there are films with female protagonists that fail it, such as the 2013 movie ''Film/{{Gravity}}'', a movie about a female astronaut attempting to survive a disaster in space. Disney's ''Disney/{{Mulan}}'' shows that a film can even fail the test for the ''same'' reasons why it has strong feminist themes: The movie discusses sexism (and overcoming it), and thus is set in a world too sexist for it to pass the test. The protagonist starts out in an environment where women are valued only for their ability to get a man and [[BabyFactory produce babies]], and then [[SweetPollyOliver moves into an environment]] where there are no other women at all because it's not allowed. A fair number of top-notch works also have legitimate reasons for [[ChromosomeCasting including no women]]. What's a problem is that ''so many'' movies fail the test, creating a pattern which says [[UnfortunateImplications uncomfortable things]] about the way Hollywood handles gender. It's also notable that part of Bechdel's original point was about how lesbian women specifically feel isolated from popular media; when there are so many examples that fail, and female characters often spend all their time talking about the men in their lives, women who aren't attracted to men can feel justifiably underrepresented. This concept can also be applied to other forms of marginalization such as race, disability, mental illness, and other issues, and remains one of the major reasons that calls for more inclusive media have been echoing for decades.

There are also lesser-known variations of the test, such as UsefulNotes/DeggansRule (aka Race Bechdel Test), in which two characters of color talk about anything other than the white leads, the [[https://www.glaad.org/sri/2014/vitorusso Vito Russo Test aka gay Bechdel Test]], in which two LGBT characters talk about everything other than straight people, and the Reverse Bechdel Test, [[GenderFlip with the roles of men and women swapped]].[[note]]An estimated 90% of works pass the Reverse Bechdel Test, [[http://www.passthebechdeltest.com/faq according to this link]], which, in comparison to the Bechdel Test, highlights the gender disparity problems.[[/note]] The film ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' has inspired the "Furiosa Test" ([[https://twitter.com/photopuck/status/607259980631273473 Do any misogynists ban this work?]]) and ''Film/PacificRim'' inspired the "Mako Mori Test" ([[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/the-big-picture/8695-Blecch-Dull-Tests Does a female lead]] get a CharacterArc that doesn't revolve around male characters?). And there is even the "[=MacGyver=] Test", inspired by [[Series/{{MacGyver}} television series of the same name]] that determines the comparative shallowness and stereotypical nature of most male characters in fiction by asking questions like "Does the male protagonist solve problems in creative and intelligent ways, only using violence as an absolute last resort?" (It is just as shocking to discover how many films and shows fail ''that'' test as fail the Bechdel Test.)

to:

There's nothing necessarily wrong with any film flunking the Bechdel Test. Indeed, there are films with female protagonists that fail it, such as the 2013 movie ''Film/{{Gravity}}'', a movie about a female astronaut attempting to survive a disaster in space. Disney's ''Disney/{{Mulan}}'' shows that a film can even fail the test for the ''same'' reasons why it has strong feminist themes: The movie discusses sexism (and overcoming it), and thus is set in a world too sexist for it to pass the test. The protagonist starts out in an environment where women are valued only for their ability to get a man and [[BabyFactory produce babies]], and then [[SweetPollyOliver moves into an environment]] where there are no other women at all because it's not allowed. A fair number of top-notch works also have legitimate reasons for [[ChromosomeCasting including no women]]. What's a problem is that ''so many'' movies fail the test, creating a pattern which says [[UnfortunateImplications uncomfortable things]] about the way Hollywood handles gender. It's also notable that part

Part
of Bechdel's original point was about how lesbian women specifically feel isolated from popular media; when there are so many examples that fail, and female characters often spend all their time talking about the men in their lives, women who aren't attracted to men can feel justifiably underrepresented. This concept can also be applied to other forms of marginalization such as race, disability, mental illness, and other issues, and remains one of the major reasons that calls for more inclusive media have been echoing for decades.

There are also lesser-known variations of the test, such as UsefulNotes/DeggansRule (aka Race Bechdel Test), in which two characters of color talk about anything other than the white leads, the [[https://www.glaad.org/sri/2014/vitorusso Vito Russo Test aka gay Bechdel Test]], in which two LGBT characters talk about everything other than straight people, and the Reverse Bechdel Test, [[GenderFlip with the roles of men and women swapped]].[[note]]An estimated 90% of works pass the Reverse Bechdel Test, [[http://www.passthebechdeltest.com/faq according to this link]], which, in comparison to the Bechdel Test, highlights the gender disparity problems.[[/note]] The film ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' has inspired the "Furiosa Test" ([[https://twitter.com/photopuck/status/607259980631273473 Do any misogynists ban this work?]]) and ''Film/PacificRim'' inspired the "Mako Mori Test" ([[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/the-big-picture/8695-Blecch-Dull-Tests Does a female lead]] get a CharacterArc that doesn't revolve around male characters?). And there is even the "[=MacGyver=] Test", inspired by [[Series/{{MacGyver}} television series of the same name]] that determines the comparative shallowness and stereotypical nature of most male characters in fiction by asking questions like "Does the male protagonist solve problems in creative and intelligent ways, only using violence as an absolute last resort?" (It is just as shocking to discover how many films and shows fail ''that'' test as fail the Bechdel Test.)



How well this can be applied to other media is a matter of some debate. Its was not designed for other media. For example, a video game or book that follows a male character's point of view will fail by default, as it is impossible for a conversation between females where a male isn't at least observing.

to:

How well this can be applied to other media is a matter of some debate. Its It was not designed for other media. For example, a video game or book that follows a male character's point of view will fail by default, as it is impossible for a conversation between females where a male isn't at least observing.



And for those curious about the pronunciation, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bechdel_test according]] to Wiki/TheOtherWiki it's like "BEK-dal" (/ˈbɛkdəl/), but Bechdel herself has [[http://www.thereader.ca/2008/07/rhymes-with-rectal-alison-bechdel.html said it rhymes with "rectal"]].[[note]]Cue all the jokes about it being so because to adhere to it is a pain in the ass.[[/note]] Well, they're almost the same, anyhow.

to:

And for those curious Curious about the pronunciation, [[https://en.pronunciation of Bechdel? [[rhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bechdel_test according]] According]] to Wiki/TheOtherWiki it's like "BEK-dal" (/ˈbɛkdəl/), but Bechdel herself has [[http://www.thereader.ca/2008/07/rhymes-with-rectal-alison-bechdel.html said it rhymes with "rectal"]].[[note]]Cue all the jokes about it being so because to adhere to it is a pain in the ass.[[/note]] Well, they're almost the same, anyhow.


How well this can be applied to other media though is a matter of some debate, as was not designed to. For example, a video game with a male player character or a book that follows a male character will fail this by default as its literally impossible for their to be a conversation between females where a male isn't at least observing. And that doesn't even get into the fact you can potentially select the gender of the PC in games.

to:

How well this can be applied to other media though is a matter of some debate, as debate. Its was not designed to. for other media. For example, a video game with a male player character or a book that follows a male character character's point of view will fail this by default default, as its literally it is impossible for their to be a conversation between females where a male isn't at least observing. And that doesn't even get into the fact you can potentially select the gender of the PC in games.observing.

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How well this can be applied to other media though is a matter of some debate, as was not designed to. For example, a video game with a male player character or a book that follows a male character will fail this by default as its literally impossible for their to be a conversation between females where a male isn't at least observing. And that doesn't even get into the fact you can potentially select the gender of the PC in games.

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* The ''Series/TheWestWing'' Season 5 episode Separation Of Powers has an entire scene of Angela Blake and Donna Moss talking about the budget negotiations and how Donna thinks the Democratic party is doing.

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