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The manner of France's defeat (punitive reparations and taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted out of Pangermanism (notably on the basis that people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]] against the socialists, while at the same time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). The fact that Bismarck also made it no secret that he thought the Kaiser's much more overt and rampant anti-Semitism and courting of the country's religious right wing presented a threat to the stability of the realm, also contributed greatly to the falling out between the two. In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.

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The manner of France's defeat (punitive reparations and taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) before. People there were offered the option of keeping the French nationality, provided they left the area before October 1st 1872[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted out of Pangermanism (notably on the basis that people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]] against the socialists, while at the same time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). The fact that Bismarck also made it no secret that he thought the Kaiser's much more overt and rampant anti-Semitism and courting of the country's religious right wing presented a threat to the stability of the realm, also contributed greatly to the falling out between the two. In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.


The manner of France's defeat (punitive reparations and taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted out of Pangermanism (notably on the basis that people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]] against the socialists, while at the same time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). The fact that Bismarck also made it no secret that he thought the Kaiser's much more overt and rampant anti-Semitism and courting of the country's religious right wing presented a threat to the stability of the realm, also contributed greatly to the spilt. In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.

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The manner of France's defeat (punitive reparations and taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted out of Pangermanism (notably on the basis that people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]] against the socialists, while at the same time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). The fact that Bismarck also made it no secret that he thought the Kaiser's much more overt and rampant anti-Semitism and courting of the country's religious right wing presented a threat to the stability of the realm, also contributed greatly to the spilt.falling out between the two. In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.


The manner of France's defeat (punitive reparations and taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted out of Pangermanism (notably on the basis that people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]] against the socialists, while at the same time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.

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The manner of France's defeat (punitive reparations and taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted out of Pangermanism (notably on the basis that people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]] against the socialists, while at the same time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). The fact that Bismarck also made it no secret that he thought the Kaiser's much more overt and rampant anti-Semitism and courting of the country's religious right wing presented a threat to the stability of the realm, also contributed greatly to the spilt. In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.


* Portrayed by Paul Hartmann (''Generalfeldmarschall'' Gerd von Rundstedt in ''Film/TheLongestDay''= in the 1940 film ''[[MononymousBiopicTitle Bismarck]]'', made in UsefulNotes/NaziGermany for some propaganda purposes. It was followed by a sequel, ''Die Entlassung'' (''The Dismissal'') in 1942, with Emil Jannings (''Film/TheBlueAngel'') taking over the role.

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* Portrayed by Paul Hartmann (''Generalfeldmarschall'' Gerd von Rundstedt in ''Film/TheLongestDay''= ''Film/TheLongestDay'') in the 1940 film ''[[MononymousBiopicTitle Bismarck]]'', made in UsefulNotes/NaziGermany for some propaganda purposes. It was followed by a sequel, ''Die Entlassung'' (''The Dismissal'') in 1942, with Emil Jannings (''Film/TheBlueAngel'') taking over the role.


The manner of France's defeat (punitive reparations and taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted out of Pangermanism (the people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]] against the socialists, while at the same time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.

to:

The manner of France's defeat (punitive reparations and taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted out of Pangermanism (the (notably on the basis that people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]] against the socialists, while at the same time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.


Added DiffLines:

* Portrayed by Paul Hartmann (''Generalfeldmarschall'' Gerd von Rundstedt in ''Film/TheLongestDay''= in the 1940 film ''[[MononymousBiopicTitle Bismarck]]'', made in UsefulNotes/NaziGermany for some propaganda purposes. It was followed by a sequel, ''Die Entlassung'' (''The Dismissal'') in 1942, with Emil Jannings (''Film/TheBlueAngel'') taking over the role.


The manner of France's defeat (Punitive Reparations and Taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted. He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]], against the socialists, while at the same time, passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws. Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.

to:

The manner of France's defeat (Punitive Reparations (punitive reparations and Taking taking away of territory against the will of the French citizens living there) there[[note]]which amounts to modern-day Moselle and Alsace, although the latter was conquered in blood by France less than three centuries before[[/note]]) in the Franco-Prussian War was of such a kind that it made long-term peace between the two nations impossible. Bismarck apparently did not want to take the territory but his general staff, namely Moltke the Elder, insisted.insisted out of Pangermanism (the people living there spoke various Germanic dialects). He then set about spending the remainder of his career in social and domestic policies while his foreign policies involved trying to form alliances with England, Austria and Russia, to better isolate France. On the domestic front, Bismarck spent much of his time enacting a series of policies to strengthen the state, first against the Catholics (Kulturkampf), [[EnemyMine then allying with the newly formed Catholic Center party]], party]] against the socialists, while at the same time, time passing welfare laws to the surprise and consternation of his conservative allies, namely pension for elderly workers and access to affordable insurance laws.laws (the first of their kind in Europe). Bismarck saw the latter as preferable to the socialist alternative of regulated workspace, safety inspections, and a shorter working-week. Laws proscribing and restricting socialist parties and left-wing parties were on the books, and Bismarck would lean on nativist conservative fears of the other (i.e. the French, the Poles, the Jews) to better strengthen the center and ruling right coalition. His downfall came with the rise to power of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The latter favoured an expansionist foreign policy while expressing opposition to Bismarck's then anti-socialist policies (not out of any sympathy to socialism but [[SlaveToPR merely because he didn't want to appear as a tyrant so early in his career]]). In his retirement, Bismarck spent his time writing his memoirs while giving interviews on how Germany would be ruined and be on the course of disaster without him. The outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, breaking out as Bismarck had predicted over "some damned foolish thing in the Balkans" appeared to have vindicated him.


Born to a land-owning UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}n family -- his father was a nobleman, his mother came from a family of (commoner) scholars and public servants, -- in 1815, Otto Eduard Leopold von Bismarck is most famous for the role he played in unifying Germany and forging it into an economic superpower, thereby creating the [[UsefulNotes/ImperialGermany German Empire]] and his Blood and Iron speech, earning himself the nickname the "[[RedBaron Iron Chancellor]]".

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Born to a land-owning UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}n family -- his father was a nobleman, his mother came from a family of (commoner) scholars and public servants, -- in 1815, Otto Eduard Leopold von Bismarck (1 April 1815 30 July 1898) is most famous for the role he played in unifying Germany and forging it into an economic superpower, thereby creating the [[UsefulNotes/ImperialGermany German Empire]] and his Blood and Iron speech, earning himself the nickname the "[[RedBaron Iron Chancellor]]".


On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual, came to power this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, leaving Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. If this was true, it was largely because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.

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On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by for expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual, came to power this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, leaving Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. If this was true, it was largely because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.


* Gilliath Osborne, from the ''VideoGame/KisekiSeries'', is a NoHistoricalFiguresWereHarmed version of Bismarck, right down to his nickname, [[RedBaron the Blood and Iron Chancellor]].

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* Gilliath Osborne, [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel Giliath Osborne]], from the ''VideoGame/KisekiSeries'', is a NoHistoricalFiguresWereHarmed version of Bismarck, right down to his nickname, [[RedBaron the Blood and Iron Chancellor]].


On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual, came to power this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, and his lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. Largely this was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.

to:

On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual, came to power this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, and his lack of foresight left leaving Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. Largely If this was true, it was largely because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.


On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I, but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual came to power, this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, and his lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. Largely this was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.

to:

On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I, I but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual individual, came to power, power this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, and his lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. Largely this was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.


On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic, nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I, but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual came to power, this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, and his lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. Largely this was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.

to:

On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic, psychopathic nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I, but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual came to power, this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, and his lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. Largely this was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.


Personally, however, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic, nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I, but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual came to power, this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, and his lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. Largely this was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.

to:

Personally, however, On the personal level, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic, nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I, but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic individual came to power, this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely, and his lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. Largely this was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.


Personally, however, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic, nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person. He viewed everyone and everything ultimately as tools: instruments and levers by which he could achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. For the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I, this held true; however when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic (though by no means wiser) individual came to power, this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely. This lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. If it was, it was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.

to:

Personally, however, Bismarck had a detached, almost psychopathic, nature. He seemed unable to separate [[ItsAllAboutMe his personal ambitions from the national interest]]. He had no true loyalty to any cause or person. He viewed person, viewing everyone and everything ultimately as tools: instruments and levers by which he could tools to achieve his ends. It was purely by the sheer force of his will and his political genius that he succeeded and survived for so long. It was clear the German government, which he had helped create, was designed to benefit one person above all: himself. On paper, the Kaiser had ultimate control and Bismarck by expediency paid lip-service to this in public, but Bismarck seemed to assume that the Kaiser would always defer to his judgment and that he, the Chancellor, would always be in control. For This held true for the first emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm I, this held true; however but when his grandson Wilhelm II, a more dynamic (though by no means wiser) individual came to power, this system fell apart. Bismarck found the new emperor difficult to control. Bismarck offered his resignation to the Kaiser in protest, a tactic he had used previously to get what he wanted. Kaiser Wilhelm II, however, ''accepted.'' By this point, Bismarck had double-crossed nearly everybody at least once, and with no support or allies he was effectively booted out of politics completely. This completely, and his lack of foresight left Germany completely unprepared to navigate a post-Bismarck world. In his retirement, Bismarck often lamented that Germany was doomed without his guidance. If it was, it Largely this was because of his own insistence that he always be there to guide it, rather than constructing a system of government that didn't require a political genius at the helm.

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