Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / NewYorkCitySubway

Go To



The A train fleet is primarily made of R46 cars, but also has a few trains of R32 cars, plus a single train of R68A cars and a few ten car trains of R179 cars.

to:

The A train fleet is primarily made of R46 cars, but also has a few trains of R32 cars, plus a single train of R68A [=R68A=] cars and a few ten car trains of R179 cars.



The C uses a variety of rolling stock, including several R32 trainsets, three trains of R46 cars, a few trains of R160A cars, and one train of R179 cars. This wide variety of trains is due to issues with rolling stock maintenance.

to:

The C uses a variety of rolling stock, including several R32 trainsets, three trains of R46 cars, a few trains of R160A [=R160A=] cars, and one train of R179 cars. This wide variety of trains is due to issues with rolling stock maintenance.



The B train fleet is pooled with the D, and is made of R68 and R68A cars.

to:

The B train fleet is pooled with the D, and is made of R68 and R68A [=R68A=] cars.



The 1 train fleet is entirely composed of R62A cars.

to:

The 1 train fleet is entirely composed of R62A [=R62A=] cars.



The 3 train fleet is made up of R62 and R62A cars stationed at Livonia Yard.

to:

The 3 train fleet is made up of R62 and R62A [=R62A=] cars stationed at Livonia Yard.



The 4 train is operated with R142 and R142A cars. It is the only line to use R142A cars, thanks to the R142A cars on the 6 train being converted to R188 cars for the IRT Flushing Line.

to:

The 4 train is operated with R142 and R142A [=R142A=] cars. It is the only line to use R142A [=R142A=] cars, thanks to the R142A [=R142A=] cars on the 6 train being converted to R188 cars for the IRT Flushing Line.



* '''6 - Pelham-Lexington Avenue Local / <6> - Pelham Express-Lexington Avenue Local''': The 6 is the local service on the Lexington Avenue Line. It operates local at all times between Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx and Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall in Lower Manhattan. Some trains run express in the peak direction between Parkchester and 3rd Avenue-138th Street and are marked as <6>, while locals are marked in a circular bullet. During weekdays in the peak direction, <6> Pelham Express trains replace 6 local ones north of Parkchester, and run express between that station and 3rd Avenue–138th Street, only stopping at Hunts Point Avenue along the route. During this time, 6 Pelham Local trains short turn at Parkchester. Weekdays from 9 AM to 11 AM, select Manhattan-bound <6> trains run local from Parkchester to Hunts Point Avenue while select Parkchester-bound 6 trains run express in that section. The 6 train is operated with a fleet of R62A cars, which were displaced from the line from 2001 to 2003 by the R142A cars and moved to the IRT Flushing Line to retire that line's Redbird trains. However, the change only lasted for 13 years before the R62A trains were transferred back to the 6 as part of the Flushing Line automation program, and the 6's R142A trains were given to the 7 to be converted to R188 cars.

to:

* '''6 - Pelham-Lexington Avenue Local / <6> - Pelham Express-Lexington Avenue Local''': The 6 is the local service on the Lexington Avenue Line. It operates local at all times between Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx and Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall in Lower Manhattan. Some trains run express in the peak direction between Parkchester and 3rd Avenue-138th Street and are marked as <6>, while locals are marked in a circular bullet. During weekdays in the peak direction, <6> Pelham Express trains replace 6 local ones north of Parkchester, and run express between that station and 3rd Avenue–138th Street, only stopping at Hunts Point Avenue along the route. During this time, 6 Pelham Local trains short turn at Parkchester. Weekdays from 9 AM to 11 AM, select Manhattan-bound <6> trains run local from Parkchester to Hunts Point Avenue while select Parkchester-bound 6 trains run express in that section. The 6 train is operated with a fleet of R62A [=R62A=] cars, which were displaced from the line from 2001 to 2003 by the R142A [=R142A=] cars and moved to the IRT Flushing Line to retire that line's Redbird trains. However, the change only lasted for 13 years before the R62A [=R62A=] trains were transferred back to the 6 as part of the Flushing Line automation program, and the 6's R142A trains were given to the 7 to be converted to R188 cars.



* '''42nd Street Shuttle''': The IRT shuttle service runs at all times except late nights, connecting Times Square to Grand Central under 42nd Street (for late night service between Times Square and Grand Central, the 7 supplements it). It is the shortest regular service in the system, running about 3,000 feet (910 m) in under two minutes. Also, in order to distinguish it from the other shuttles in the system, NYCT Rapid Transit Operations internally refers to it as the 0 (zero). It uses short trains of R62A cars.

to:

* '''42nd Street Shuttle''': The IRT shuttle service runs at all times except late nights, connecting Times Square to Grand Central under 42nd Street (for late night service between Times Square and Grand Central, the 7 supplements it). It is the shortest regular service in the system, running about 3,000 feet (910 m) in under two minutes. Also, in order to distinguish it from the other shuttles in the system, NYCT Rapid Transit Operations internally refers to it as the 0 (zero). It uses short trains of R62A [=R62A=] cars.


** The R46 fleet was once described as [[TheAllegedCar the subway's lemon]], as the cars were plagued with maintenance issues from the beginning: Pullman, the train manufacturer, delivered them far behind schedule due to a strike at one of its production factories; cracks appearing in the frame of the trucks of subway cars, as they contained the wheels, motors, and axles and are attached to the train car; faulty hand brakes; and an inspection revealing that the steel where the car body was joined to the truck was wearing away. These various problems forced the MTA to limit the usage of R46 trains due to the the cracked trucks and sue Pullman for $80 million in damages, while being forced to use the recently retired R16 fleet until the R46 trains were repaired. Later on, the trains were overhauled in the 1990s to improve their service reliability.

to:

** The R46 fleet was once described as [[TheAllegedCar the subway's lemon]], as the cars were plagued with maintenance issues from the beginning: Pullman, the train manufacturer, delivered them far behind schedule due to a strike at one of its production factories; cracks appearing in the frame of the trucks of subway cars, as they contained the wheels, motors, and axles and are attached to the train car; faulty hand brakes; and an inspection revealing that the steel where the car body was joined to the truck was wearing away. These various problems forced the MTA to limit the usage of R46 trains due to the the cracked trucks and sue Pullman for $80 million in damages, while being forced to use the recently retired R16 fleet until the R46 trains were repaired. Later on, the trains were overhauled in the 1990s to improve their service reliability.



* '''E - Jamaica Express-Eighth Avenue Local via 53rd Street''': The E runs from Jamaica Center to World Trade Center at all times (with some peak-direction rush hour-only trips coming to/from 179th Street due to capacity issues at Jamaica Center, while a few Jamaica-bound rush hour trips short-turn at Kew Gardens), running express along the IND Queens Boulevard between Queens Plaza and Jamaica-Van Wyck during weekdays, and between Queens Plaza and Forest Hills during weekends. During late nights, the E runs local on the rest of the IND Queens Boulevard Line to replace the the R and M trains.\\

to:

* '''E - Jamaica Express-Eighth Avenue Local via 53rd Street''': The E runs from Jamaica Center to World Trade Center at all times (with some peak-direction rush hour-only trips coming to/from 179th Street due to capacity issues at Jamaica Center, while a few Jamaica-bound rush hour trips short-turn at Kew Gardens), running express along the IND Queens Boulevard between Queens Plaza and Jamaica-Van Wyck during weekdays, and between Queens Plaza and Forest Hills during weekends. During late nights, the E runs local on the rest of the IND Queens Boulevard Line to replace the the R and M trains.\\



* '''N - Astoria-Broadway-Sea Beach Express via Bridge''': The N operates at all times between Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria, Queens and Coney Island via the Sea Beach Line, running express between 34th Street-Herald Square in Manhattan and 59th Street-4th Avenue in Brooklyn (via the Manhattan Bridge and skipping [=DeKalb=] Avenue) during daytime hours on weekdays, with some rush hour trips coming to/from to 96th Street on the 2nd Avenue Line (skipping 49th Steet); some rush hour put-ins also begin and end their trips at Gravesend-86th Street. During weekends, it operates as an express between Canal Street and 59th Street-4th Avenue (also via the bridge, skipping [=DeKalb=] Avenue), and runs local via the Montague Street Tunnel during late nights, replacing the R (which runs only between Whitehall and 95th Streets during late nights; local service on Queens Boulevard is supplemented by the E). Until 1987, the the N's northbound terminal was Forest Hills, while the R terminated at Astoria, but this was switched over in order to give the R a direct access to a train yard. Previously, the N had easy access to the Jamaica and Coney Island yards, while the R had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard.\\

to:

* '''N - Astoria-Broadway-Sea Beach Express via Bridge''': The N operates at all times between Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria, Queens and Coney Island via the Sea Beach Line, running express between 34th Street-Herald Square in Manhattan and 59th Street-4th Avenue in Brooklyn (via the Manhattan Bridge and skipping [=DeKalb=] Avenue) during daytime hours on weekdays, with some rush hour trips coming to/from to 96th Street on the 2nd Avenue Line (skipping 49th Steet); some rush hour put-ins also begin and end their trips at Gravesend-86th Street. During weekends, it operates as an express between Canal Street and 59th Street-4th Avenue (also via the bridge, skipping [=DeKalb=] Avenue), and runs local via the Montague Street Tunnel during late nights, replacing the R (which runs only between Whitehall and 95th Streets during late nights; local service on Queens Boulevard is supplemented by the E). Until 1987, the the N's northbound terminal was Forest Hills, while the R terminated at Astoria, but this was switched over in order to give the R a direct access to a train yard. Previously, the N had easy access to the Jamaica and Coney Island yards, while the R had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard.\\



* '''R - Queens Boulevard-Broadway-4th Avenue Local via Tunnel''': The R operates between Forest Hills, Queens and 95th Street in Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn at all times except late nights (when it short-turns at South Ferry-Whitehall Street), running local on the Queens Boulevard, Broadway (via the Montague Street Tunnel) and 4th Avenue Lines; some 95th Street-bound trains short turn at 59th Street-4th Avenue during rush hours, while some northbound put-ins begin their trip at 36th Street-4th Avenue. Late night service originally ended at 36th Street in Brooklyn, but was extended to South Ferry in November 2016 in order to reduce the need to transfer at 36th Street, thereby eliminating the need for northbound trains to skip the 45th and 53rd Street stops. Also, many southbound trips used to short-turn at either Canal Street or South Ferry during rush hours, resulting in long headways along the R in Brooklyn. Beginning November 2017, one northbound rush hour trip terminates at 96th Street-2nd Avenue due to rising demand for service along the 2nd Avenue Line. Until 1987, the the R's northbound terminal was Astoria, while the N terminated at Forest Hills, but this was switched over in order to give the R a direct access to a train yard. Previously, the N had easy access to the Jamaica and Coney Island yards, while the R had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard. Also until 1987, some rush-hour only trips ran from Bay Ridge to Chambers Street on the Nassau Street Line.\\

to:

* '''R - Queens Boulevard-Broadway-4th Avenue Local via Tunnel''': The R operates between Forest Hills, Queens and 95th Street in Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn at all times except late nights (when it short-turns at South Ferry-Whitehall Street), running local on the Queens Boulevard, Broadway (via the Montague Street Tunnel) and 4th Avenue Lines; some 95th Street-bound trains short turn at 59th Street-4th Avenue during rush hours, while some northbound put-ins begin their trip at 36th Street-4th Avenue. Late night service originally ended at 36th Street in Brooklyn, but was extended to South Ferry in November 2016 in order to reduce the need to transfer at 36th Street, thereby eliminating the need for northbound trains to skip the 45th and 53rd Street stops. Also, many southbound trips used to short-turn at either Canal Street or South Ferry during rush hours, resulting in long headways along the R in Brooklyn. Beginning November 2017, one northbound rush hour trip terminates at 96th Street-2nd Avenue due to rising demand for service along the 2nd Avenue Line. Until 1987, the the R's northbound terminal was Astoria, while the N terminated at Forest Hills, but this was switched over in order to give the R a direct access to a train yard. Previously, the N had easy access to the Jamaica and Coney Island yards, while the R had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard. Also until 1987, some rush-hour only trips ran from Bay Ridge to Chambers Street on the Nassau Street Line.\\


The way to tell the lines apart is that ex-IRT routes, now officially known as Division A, have number designations (except for the 42nd Street Shuttle between Times Square and Grand Central). Division A trains also have smaller cars (51 feet long, 9 feet wide, with three doors on each side) due to sharper curves and shorter platform clearances. The distinction between IND and BMT was seriously blurred after unification by the construction of several track connections, and they are now known officially as the single Division B. The Division B routes use letter designations, as well as larger cars (60 feet long, 10 feet wide, with four doors on each side).[[note]]Some of the older Division B cars are 75 feet long, as the IND was built to handle that length of car while having the same clearance for 10-foot-wide cars as the BMT, but the older elevated eastern portions of the J, L, M, and Z routes, which are among the oldest structures in the system, cannot accommodate the longer cars, so instead of continuing to have two separate fleets for the one division, all Division B cars ordered since the 90s have been built to the same 60 foot length.[[/note]] The consolidation into one division has led to many lines that have substantial portions on both ex-BMT and ex-IND tracks, such as the D[[note]]Runs on the IND Concourse Line in the Bronx, IND Eighth and Sixth Avenue Lines in Manhattan, and the BMT 4th Avenue and West End Lines in Brooklyn[[/note]], the R[[note]]Runs on the BMT 4th Avenue Line in Brooklyn and the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan, then uses a track connection in the 60th Street Tunnel to use the IND Queens Boulevard Line in Queens[[/note]], and the M[[note]]Uses the IND Queens Boulevard and Sixth Avenue Lines via 53rd Street, then uses the Chrystie Street Connection to connect to the BMT Jamaica and the Myrtle Avenue Lines[[/note]], among others.

to:

The way to tell the lines apart is that ex-IRT routes, now officially known as Division A, the A Division, have number designations (except for the 42nd Street Shuttle between Times Square and Grand Central). A Division A trains also have smaller cars (51 feet long, 9 feet wide, with three doors on each side) due to sharper curves and shorter platform clearances. The distinction between IND and BMT was seriously blurred after unification by the construction of several track connections, and they are now known officially as the single B Division. The B Division B. The Division B routes use letter designations, as well as larger cars (60 feet long, 10 feet wide, with four doors on each side).[[note]]Some of the older B Division B cars are 75 feet long, as the IND was built to handle that length of car while having the same clearance for 10-foot-wide cars as the BMT, but the older elevated eastern portions of the J, L, M, and Z routes, which are among the oldest structures in the system, cannot accommodate the longer cars, so instead of continuing to have two separate fleets for the one division, all B Division B cars ordered since the 90s have been built to the same 60 foot length.[[/note]] The consolidation into one division has led to many lines that have substantial portions on both ex-BMT and ex-IND tracks, such as the D[[note]]Runs on the IND Concourse Line in the Bronx, IND Eighth and Sixth Avenue Lines in Manhattan, and the BMT 4th Avenue and West End Lines in Brooklyn[[/note]], the R[[note]]Runs on the BMT 4th Avenue Line in Brooklyn and the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan, then uses a track connection in the 60th Street Tunnel to use the IND Queens Boulevard Line in Queens[[/note]], and the M[[note]]Uses the IND Queens Boulevard and Sixth Avenue Lines via 53rd Street, then uses the Chrystie Street Connection to connect to the BMT Jamaica and the Myrtle Avenue Lines[[/note]], among others.


* '''A - Eighth Avenue-Fulton Street-Rockaway Express''': The A runs from 207th Street in Inwood, Manhattan to either the Rockaways or to Lefferts Boulevard in Richmond Hill, Queens. During the daytime, the A runs express along the 8th Avenue and Fulton Street Lines between 168th Street and Euclid Avenue, and then local to either Far Rockaway or Lefferts Boulevard, with some peak direction rush hour-only trips coming to/from Rockaway Park. Some northbound trains also terminate at either Dyckman Street or 168th Street during rush hours. The A provides the longest one-seat ride in the system, at 32 miles (51 km) between Inwood and Far Rockaway and has a weekday ridership of 600,000. During late nights, the A runs local and serves as a replacement for the C, originating to/from Far Rockaway only, with shuttle train service between Euclid Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard. Another shuttle runs on the Rockaway Park branch during off-peak hours.
* '''C - Eighth Avenue-Fulton Street Local''': The C runs local from 168th Street in Washington Heights to Euclid Avenue only during daytime hours. During late nights, the A serves as a replacement for the C, originating to/from Far Rockaway only, while a shuttle runs between Euclid Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard.
* '''E - Jamaica Express-Eighth Avenue Local via 53rd Street''': The E runs from Jamaica Center to World Trade Center at all times (with some peak-direction rush hour-only trips coming to/from 179th Street due to capacity issues at Jamaica Center, while a few Jamaica-bound rush hour trips short-turn at Kew Gardens), running express between Queens Plaza and Jamaica-Van Wyck during weekdays, and between Queens Plaza and Forest Hills during weekends. During late nights, the E runs local along its entire route (serving as a replacement for the R and M lines; local service on Broadway is provided by the N and Q lines, and by the F line on 6th Avenue), with the F staying express 24/7 on the Queens Boulevard Line.

to:

* '''A - Eighth Avenue-Fulton Street-Rockaway Express''': The A runs from 207th Street in Inwood, Manhattan to either the Rockaways or to Lefferts Boulevard in Richmond Hill, Queens. During the daytime, the A runs express along the 8th Avenue and Fulton Street Lines between 168th Street and Euclid Avenue, and then local to either Far Rockaway or Lefferts Boulevard, with some peak direction rush hour-only trips coming to/from Rockaway Park. Some northbound trains also terminate at either Dyckman Street or 168th Street during rush hours. The A provides the longest one-seat ride in the system, at 32 miles (51 km) between Inwood and Far Rockaway and has a weekday ridership of 600,000. During late nights, the A runs local and serves as a replacement for the C, originating to/from Far Rockaway only, with shuttle train service between Euclid Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard. Another shuttle runs on the Rockaway Park branch during off-peak hours.
hours.\\
The A train fleet is primarily made of R46 cars, but also has a few trains of R32 cars, plus a single train of R68A cars and a few ten car trains of R179 cars.
* '''C - Eighth Avenue-Fulton Street Local''': The C runs is a local supplement to the A train, running from 168th Street in Washington Heights to Euclid Avenue only during daytime hours. During late nights, the A serves as a replacement for the C, originating to/from Far Rockaway only, while a shuttle runs between Euclid Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard.
Boulevard.\\
The C uses a variety of rolling stock, including several R32 trainsets, three trains of R46 cars, a few trains of R160A cars, and one train of R179 cars. This wide variety of trains is due to issues with rolling stock maintenance.
* '''E - Jamaica Express-Eighth Avenue Local via 53rd Street''': The E runs from Jamaica Center to World Trade Center at all times (with some peak-direction rush hour-only trips coming to/from 179th Street due to capacity issues at Jamaica Center, while a few Jamaica-bound rush hour trips short-turn at Kew Gardens), running express along the IND Queens Boulevard between Queens Plaza and Jamaica-Van Wyck during weekdays, and between Queens Plaza and Forest Hills during weekends. During late nights, the E runs local along its entire route (serving as a replacement for the R and M lines; local service on Broadway is provided by the N and Q lines, and by the F line on 6th Avenue), with the F staying express 24/7 on the rest of the IND Queens Boulevard Line.Line to replace the the R and M trains.\\
The E train uses a fleet made entirely of R160 cars.



* '''B - Concourse Local-Sixth Avenue-Brighton Express via Bridge''': The B only operates on weekdays. During rush hours, it goes from Bedford Park Boulevard in the Bronx to Brighton Beach, running local on the Concourse and 8th Avenue Lines, while midday trips end at 145th Street in Harlem. After leaving 59th Street-Columbus Circle, it runs express along the Sixth Avenue and Brighton Lines to Brighton Beach (local service on the Brighton Line is provided by the Q at all times). During the early 2000s, the Manhattan Bridge's north side closed, and the W was created to replace the B in Brooklyn and provide service to Coney Island (via West End), while the Q was rerouted to the Broadway Line. When the Manhattan Bridge tracks re-opened in 2004, the D was made the West End service to Coney Island, while the B was made the part-time Brighton express to Brighton Beach.
* '''D - Concourse-Sixth Avenue-West End Express via Bridge''': The D operates at all times between Norwood-205th Street in the Bronx and Coney Island via the West End Line. It runs express in Manhattan (Central Park West and 6th Avenue) and makes all stops on the West End Line in Brooklyn; the D also makes all stops in the Bronx except when it runs express in the peak direction during rush hours. It also runs express on the 4th Avenue Line at all times except nights when it serves all stops, supplementing the R (which runs only between Whitehall and 95th Streets during late nights). Prior to the Manhattan Bridge closures, the D ran as the Brighton express to Coney Island, while the B ran via West End; this changed in 2001, when the W replaced the B as the West End express, while the Q was made the Broadway express. When the Manhattan Bridge tracks re-opened in 2004, the D was made the West End service to Coney Island, while the B was made the part-time Brighton express to Brighton Beach.
* '''F - Jamaica Express-Sixth Avenue-Culver Local via 63rd Street''': The F operates at all times between 179th Street in Jamaica, Queens and Coney Island via the Culver Line, serving all stops except for an express section between 21st Street-Queensbridge and Forest Hills along the Queens Boulevard Line. Some trains short-turn at Kings Highway due to capacity issues at Coney Island during rush hours. Since the 2010s, there have been calls to restore express service from Jay Street to Church Avenue on the Culver Line during rush hours, although this has been controversial as some riders along the line fear they would lose their one-seat ride to Manhattan. Previously, the Culver Line had express service from Jay Street to Kings Highway between 1967 and 1987, but this was eliminated due to low patronage and budget cuts. A limited express service between Jay Street and Church Avenue started on September 16, 2019, with two trains running in the peak direction during rush hours, and is represented with a diamond <F>, similar to the symbol used on the other peak-direction express services.
* '''M - Queens Boulevard-Sixth Avenue-Myrtle Avenue Local via 53rd Street''': The M operates between Forest Hills and Metropolitan Avenue in Middle Village, Queens via the Queens Boulevard, 6th Avenue (via 53rd Street), Jamaica and Myrtle Avenue Lines, making the M the only service that travels through the same borough via two different, unconnected lines. The M short turns at Essex Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan on weekends, and at Myrtle Avenue–Broadway in Brooklyn during late nights; late night service on the Queens Boulevard Line is supplemented by the E train. This route is the only non-shuttle service that has both of its full-run terminals in the same borough (Queens). The 71st Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue termini of the M are 2.47 miles (3.98 km) apart, marking this as the shortest geographic distance between termini for a non-shuttle service. Prior to June 2010, the M traveled during weekday rush hours to Bay Parkway on the West End Line via Nassau Street, and to Chambers Street during midday hours. During the 14th Street Tunnel shutdown, weekend and evening M service is extended to 96th Street on the 2nd Avenue Line to compensate for limited L service between Brooklyn and Manhattan, as well as increasing weekday and weekend service.[[note]]The rush hour service to Bay Parkway was a remnant of the Bankers' Specials the BMT used to run over the Manhattan Bridge until 1967, when the Nassau Street connection to the bridge was severed due to the Chrystie Street connection linking the 6th Avenue Line to Manhattan Bridge north side (the south side tracks were rerouted to the Broadway Line). The Nassau Street Loop allowed trains to originate in Brooklyn either via the 4th Avenue or Brighton lines (and through either the bridge or the Montague Street Tunnel), run via Nassau Street and return to Brooklyn (again, either the bridge or tunnel) without having to terminate and reverse directions during rush hours. Also, prior to the opening of the Chrystie Street Connection, which enabled 6th Avenue trains to utilize the Manhattan and Williamsburg Bridges, and in turn linking the IND with the BMT, the Manhattan Bridge's south side tracks fed into Nassau Street, but were only used during rush hours, while the northern tracks fed into the Broadway Line's express tracks.[[/note]]

to:

* '''B - Concourse Local-Eighth Avenue Local-Sixth Avenue-Brighton Express via Bridge''': The B only operates on weekdays. During rush hours, it goes from Bedford Park Boulevard in the Bronx to Brighton Beach, running local on the Concourse and 8th Avenue Lines, while midday trips end at 145th Street in Harlem. After leaving 59th Street-Columbus Circle, it runs express along the Sixth Avenue and Brighton Lines to Brighton Beach (local service on the Brighton Line is provided by the Q at all times). During the early 2000s, the Manhattan Bridge's north side closed, and the W was created to replace the B in Brooklyn and provide service to Coney Island (via West End), while the Q was rerouted to the Broadway Line. When the Manhattan Bridge tracks re-opened in 2004, the B and D swapped routes. The D was made the West End service to Coney Island, while the B was made the part-time Brighton express Express to Brighton Beach.
Beach. This was done to eliminate the need for weekend and late night shuttles on the BMT West End Line.\\
The B train fleet is pooled with the D, and is made of R68 and R68A cars.
* '''D - Concourse-Sixth Avenue-West End Express via Bridge''': The D operates at all times between Norwood-205th Street in the Bronx and Coney Island via the West End Line. It runs express in Manhattan (Central Park West and 6th Avenue) and makes all stops on the West End Line in Brooklyn; the D also makes all stops in the Bronx except when it runs express in the peak direction during rush hours. It also runs express on the 4th Avenue Line at all times except nights when it serves all stops, supplementing the R (which runs only between Whitehall and 95th Streets during late nights). Prior to the Manhattan Bridge closures, the D ran as the Brighton express to Coney Island, while the B ran via West End; this changed in 2001, when the W replaced the B as the West End express, while the Q was made the Broadway express. When the Manhattan Bridge tracks re-opened in 2004, the D was made the West End service to Coney Island, while the B was made the part-time Brighton express to Brighton Beach.
Beach. The D is one of only three lines to have 24 hour express service on a portion of the line, the others being the 3 and F trains.\\
The D train fleet is entirely made of R68 cars.
* '''F - Jamaica Express-Sixth Avenue-Culver Local via 63rd Street''': The F operates at all times between 179th Street in Jamaica, Queens and Coney Island via the Culver Line, serving all stops except for an express section between 21st Street-Queensbridge and Forest Hills along the Queens Boulevard Line. Some trains short-turn at Kings Highway due to capacity issues at Coney Island during rush hours. Since the 2010s, there have been calls to restore express service from Jay Street to Church Avenue on the Culver Line during rush hours, although this has been controversial as some riders along the line fear they would lose their one-seat ride to Manhattan. Previously, the Culver Line had express service from Jay Street to Kings Highway between 1967 and 1987, but this was eliminated due to low patronage and budget cuts.
**'''<F> - Jamaica Express-Sixth Avenue Local-Culver Express via 63rd Street''':
A limited express service service between Jay Street and Church Avenue started on September 16, 2019, with two trains running in the peak direction during rush hours, and is represented with a diamond <F>, similar to the symbol used on the other peak-direction express services.
services.\\
The F train is operated with a mix of R160 and R46 cars.
* '''M - Queens Boulevard-Sixth Avenue-Myrtle Avenue Local via 53rd Street''': The M operates between Forest Hills and Metropolitan Avenue in Middle Village, Queens via the Queens Boulevard, 6th Avenue (via 53rd Street), Jamaica and Myrtle Avenue Lines, making the M the only service that travels through the same borough via two different, unconnected lines. The M short turns at Essex Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan on weekends, and at Myrtle Avenue–Broadway in Brooklyn during late nights; late night service on the Queens Boulevard Line is supplemented by the E train. This route is the only non-shuttle service that has both of its full-run terminals in the same borough (Queens). The 71st Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue termini of the M are 2.47 miles (3.98 km) apart, marking this as the shortest geographic distance between termini for a non-shuttle service. Prior to June 28, 2010, the M traveled during weekday rush hours to Bay Parkway on the West End Line via Nassau Street, and to Chambers Street during midday hours. As part of the 2010 service changes, it was combined with the V train to allow a one-seat ride to Midtown for passengers on the BMT Jamaica Line. During the 14th Street Tunnel shutdown, weekend and evening M service is extended routed to 96th Street on the 2nd Second Avenue Line to compensate for limited L service between Brooklyn and Manhattan, as well as increasing weekday and weekend service.[[note]]The rush hour service to Bay Parkway was a remnant of the Bankers' Specials the BMT used to run over the Manhattan Bridge until 1967, when the Nassau Street connection to the bridge was severed due to the Chrystie Street connection Connection linking the 6th Sixth Avenue Line to Manhattan Bridge north side (the side, while the south side tracks into Chambers Street were rerouted to the Broadway Line). Line express tracks; the Broadway Line used to use the north side Manhattan Bridge tracks. The Nassau Street Loop allowed trains to originate in Brooklyn either via the 4th Fourth Avenue or Brighton lines (and through either the bridge or the Montague Street Tunnel), run via Nassau Street and return to Brooklyn (again, either the bridge or tunnel) without having to terminate and reverse directions during rush hours. Also, prior to the opening of the The Chrystie Street Connection, which enabled 6th Avenue trains to utilize Connection also saw the Manhattan and Williamsburg Bridges, and in turn linking opening of connecting tracks from the IND with Sixth Avenue Line to the BMT, the Manhattan Bridge's south side tracks fed into BMT Nassau Street Line at Essex Street, but were only used during rush hours, while the northern and it is these tracks fed into the Broadway Line's express tracks.[[/note]]M uses to move from the BMT to the IND.[[/note]]\\
The M train is operated entirely with R160 and R179 cars.



* '''G - Brooklyn-Queens Crosstown Line''': The G operates at all times between Court Square in Long Island City, Queens and Church Avenue in Kensington, Brooklyn via the Crosstown and Culver Lines. In Queens, it only serves two stations – Court Square and 21st Street, both in Long Island City – but previously served all stations to/from Forest Hills on the Queens Boulevard Line. It is the only non-shuttle line in the system that does not serve Manhattan and suffers from ongoing disruptions and poor service, leading to frequent criticism from locals.

to:

* '''G - Brooklyn-Queens Crosstown Line''': The G operates at all times between Court Square in Long Island City, Queens and Church Avenue in Kensington, Brooklyn via the Crosstown and Culver Lines. In Queens, it only serves two stations – Court Square and 21st Street, both in Long Island City – but previously served all stations to/from Forest Hills on the Queens Boulevard Line. It is the only non-shuttle line in the system that does not serve Manhattan and suffers from ongoing disruptions and poor service, leading to frequent criticism from locals.\\
The G train uses R68 cars, though it has also used R46 and R160 equipment from the F train in times of service disruption.



* '''Z - Nassau Street-Jamaica Express''': The Z operates internally as a rush-hour variant of the J, with six trips in the peak direction on weekdays; some Jamaica Center-bound trains also short turn at Broadway Junction during rush hours. During rush hours also in the peak direction, the Z forms a skip-stop pair between Sutphin Boulevard and Myrtle Avenue with the J. At all other times, the J serves every station on its entire route.

to:

* '''Z **'''Z - Nassau Street-Jamaica Express''': The Z operates internally as a rush-hour variant of the J, with six trips in the peak direction on weekdays; some Jamaica Center-bound trains also short turn at Broadway Junction during rush hours. During rush hours also in the peak direction, the Z forms a skip-stop pair between Sutphin Boulevard and Myrtle Avenue with the J. At all other times, the J serves every station on its entire route. The rapper Music/JayZ adapted his stage name in part as a shoutout to the combined J / Z service which services his childhood neighborhood of Bedford - Stuyvesent.\\
The J / Z service is operated by R160 and R179 trains, and a few R42 and R32 trains.



* '''N - Astoria-Broadway-Sea Beach Express via Bridge''': The N operates at all times between Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria, Queens and Coney Island via the Sea Beach Line, running express between 34th Street-Herald Square in Manhattan and 59th Street-4th Avenue in Brooklyn (via the Manhattan Bridge and skipping [=DeKalb=] Avenue) during daytime hours on weekdays, with some rush hour trips coming to/from to 96th Street on the 2nd Avenue Line (skipping 49th Steet); some rush hour put-ins also begin and end their trips at Gravesend-86th Street. During weekends, it operates as an express between Canal Street and 59th Street-4th Avenue (also via the bridge, skipping [=DeKalb=] Avenue), and runs local via the Montague Street Tunnel during late nights, replacing the R (which runs only between Whitehall and 95th Streets during late nights; local service on Queens Boulevard is supplemented by the E). Until 1987, the the N's northbound terminal was Forest Hills, while the R terminated at Astoria, but this was switched over in order to give the R a direct access to a train yard. Previously, the N had easy access to the Jamaica and Coney Island yards, while the R had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard.
* '''Q - Second Avenue-Broadway Express-Brighton Local via Bridge''': The Q operates between 96th Street-2nd Avenue on the Upper East Side in Manhattan and Coney Island at all times, running express on the Broadway Line in Manhattan (except during late nights, when it runs local between Canal Street and 57th Street-7th Avenue via the Manhattan Bridge), crossing over the Manhattan Bridge south side, and serving all stops on the Brighton Line in Brooklyn (the B runs express only on weekdays between Prospect Park and Brighton Beach). Prior to this service realignment, the Q ran to Astoria on weekdays (and to 57th Street-7th Avenue during late nights and weekends), serving as a replacement for the W, which was originally eliminated in 2010 due to budget cuts.
* '''R - Queens Boulevard-Broadway-4th Avenue Local via Tunnel''': The R operates between Forest Hills, Queens and 95th Street in Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn at all times except late nights (when it short-turns at South Ferry-Whitehall Street), running local on the Queens Boulevard, Broadway (via the Montague Street Tunnel) and 4th Avenue Lines; some 95th Street-bound trains short turn at 59th Street-4th Avenue during rush hours, while some northbound put-ins begin their trip at 36th Street-4th Avenue. Late night service originally ended at 36th Street in Brooklyn, but was extended to South Ferry in November 2016 in order to reduce the need to transfer at 36th Street, thereby eliminating the need for northbound trains to skip the 45th and 53rd Street stops. Also, many southbound trips used to short-turn at either Canal Street or South Ferry during rush hours, resulting in long headways along the R in Brooklyn. Beginning November 2017, one northbound rush hour trip terminates at 96th Street-2nd Avenue due to rising demand for service along the 2nd Avenue Line. Until 1987, the the R's northbound terminal was Astoria, while the N terminated at Forest Hills, but this was switched over in order to give the R a direct access to a train yard. Previously, the N had easy access to the Jamaica and Coney Island yards, while the R had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard. Also until 1987, some rush-hour only trips ran from Bay Ridge to Chambers Street on the Nassau Street Line.
* '''W - Astoria-Broadway Local''': The W is a weekday-only service, running local between Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard and South Ferry in Lower Manhattan. Some rush-hour trains originate from Coney Island (running local via the Sea Beach and 4th Avenue Lines) while the last-scheduled trips are extended to Gravesend-86th Street on the Sea Beach Line to be sent down to the Coney Island Yard. On weekends, the N and R trains replace it. The W was first introduced in 2001 as part of the major service realignments caused by years of track work on the Manhattan Bridge. It was created to replace the B in Brooklyn and provide service between Coney Island (via West End) and Manhattan. In February 2004, when the north tracks on the Manhattan Bridge reopened, the W was cut back to its current service pattern while the D train replaced it in Brooklyn (prior to the track closures, the D ran to Coney Island as the Brighton express). In June 2010, the W was eliminated due to budget cuts, and was replaced by the Q in Queens and the N and R in Manhattan. With the rerouting of the Q to the 2nd Avenue Line in 2017, the W was reintroduced in November 2016 to maintain weekday service capacity on the Astoria and Broadway Lines.

to:

* '''N - Astoria-Broadway-Sea Beach Express via Bridge''': The N operates at all times between Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria, Queens and Coney Island via the Sea Beach Line, running express between 34th Street-Herald Square in Manhattan and 59th Street-4th Avenue in Brooklyn (via the Manhattan Bridge and skipping [=DeKalb=] Avenue) during daytime hours on weekdays, with some rush hour trips coming to/from to 96th Street on the 2nd Avenue Line (skipping 49th Steet); some rush hour put-ins also begin and end their trips at Gravesend-86th Street. During weekends, it operates as an express between Canal Street and 59th Street-4th Avenue (also via the bridge, skipping [=DeKalb=] Avenue), and runs local via the Montague Street Tunnel during late nights, replacing the R (which runs only between Whitehall and 95th Streets during late nights; local service on Queens Boulevard is supplemented by the E). Until 1987, the the N's northbound terminal was Forest Hills, while the R terminated at Astoria, but this was switched over in order to give the R a direct access to a train yard. Previously, the N had easy access to the Jamaica and Coney Island yards, while the R had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard. \n\\
The N train is operated primarily with R160 cars, as well as a limited number of R68 trains.
* '''Q - Second Avenue-Broadway Express-Brighton Local via Bridge''': The Q operates between 96th Street-2nd Avenue on the Upper East Side in Manhattan and Coney Island at all times, running express on the Broadway Line in Manhattan (except during late nights, when it runs local between Canal Street and 57th Street-7th Avenue via the Manhattan Bridge), crossing over the Manhattan Bridge south side, and serving all stops on the Brighton Line in Brooklyn (the B runs express only on weekdays between Prospect Park and Brighton Beach). Prior to this service realignment, the Q ran to Astoria on weekdays (and to 57th Street-7th Avenue during late nights and weekends), serving as a replacement for the W, which was originally eliminated in 2010 due to budget cuts.
cuts.\\
The Q train is operated entirely with R160 cars except for an afternoon rush hour train that uses an R68 set from Coney Island Yard.
* '''R - Queens Boulevard-Broadway-4th Avenue Local via Tunnel''': The R operates between Forest Hills, Queens and 95th Street in Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn at all times except late nights (when it short-turns at South Ferry-Whitehall Street), running local on the Queens Boulevard, Broadway (via the Montague Street Tunnel) and 4th Avenue Lines; some 95th Street-bound trains short turn at 59th Street-4th Avenue during rush hours, while some northbound put-ins begin their trip at 36th Street-4th Avenue. Late night service originally ended at 36th Street in Brooklyn, but was extended to South Ferry in November 2016 in order to reduce the need to transfer at 36th Street, thereby eliminating the need for northbound trains to skip the 45th and 53rd Street stops. Also, many southbound trips used to short-turn at either Canal Street or South Ferry during rush hours, resulting in long headways along the R in Brooklyn. Beginning November 2017, one northbound rush hour trip terminates at 96th Street-2nd Avenue due to rising demand for service along the 2nd Avenue Line. Until 1987, the the R's northbound terminal was Astoria, while the N terminated at Forest Hills, but this was switched over in order to give the R a direct access to a train yard. Previously, the N had easy access to the Jamaica and Coney Island yards, while the R had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard. Also until 1987, some rush-hour only trips ran from Bay Ridge to Chambers Street on the Nassau Street Line.
Line.\\
Until 2016, late night R service only ran to 36th Street on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line, and passengers had to transfer to a D or N train to continue to Manhattan. The 2016 service changes that reintorduced the W train also extended late night R service to Whitehall Street, for the purposes of increasing frequencies along the Fourth Avenue Line. The N still replaces the R at stations from Whitehall Street to Lexington Avenue 59th Street during late nights, and the E replaces it in Queens during these times.\\
The R train is operated entirely by R46 trains stationed at Jamaica Yard.
* '''W - Astoria-Broadway Local''': The W is a weekday-only service, running local between Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard and South Ferry in Lower Manhattan. Some rush-hour trains originate from Coney Island (running local via the Sea Beach and 4th Avenue Lines) while the last-scheduled trips are extended to Gravesend-86th Street on the Sea Beach Line to be sent down to the Coney Island Yard. On weekends, the N and R trains replace it. The W was first introduced in on July 22, 2001 as part of the major service realignments caused by years of track work on the Manhattan Bridge. It was created to replace the B in Brooklyn and provide service between Coney Island (via the BMT West End) End Line) and Manhattan. In February On Feburary 22, 2004, when the north tracks on the Manhattan Bridge reopened, the W was cut back to its current service pattern while the D train replaced it in Brooklyn (prior to the track closures, the D ran to Coney Island as the Brighton express). In On June 28, 2010, the W was eliminated due to budget cuts, and was replaced by the Q in Queens and the N and R in Manhattan. With However, on November 7, 2016, the W was restored to fill in the service gap created by the full-time rerouting of the Q to the 2nd Second Avenue Line in 2017, the W was reintroduced in November 2016 to Subway, and maintain weekday service capacity on the Astoria and Broadway Lines.\\
The W is staffed internally as part of the N, so all of its rolling stock is shared with the N.



* '''L - 14th Street–Canarsie Line''': The L operates between 8th Avenue-14th Street in Chelsea, Manhattan, and Rockaway Parkway in Canarsie, Brooklyn at all times, serving the 14th Street-Canarsie Line; some southbound trains also short-turn at Myrtle-Wyckoff Avenues during rush hours. It is also the first subway line to be fully automated, using communications-based train control rather than block signaling, which most of the system currently uses. Starting April 27, 2019, and continuing until mid-2020, service will be limited between Third Avenue and Bedford Avenue on late nights and weekends to allow for repairs on the Canarsie Line tunnels under the East River, which were badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The original plans called for a full 15-month closure similar to the repairs done on the Montague Street tunnel, which carries the R, but the plans were revised in January 2019.

to:

* '''L - 14th Street–Canarsie Line''': The L operates between 8th Avenue-14th Street in Chelsea, Manhattan, and Rockaway Parkway in Canarsie, Brooklyn at all times, serving the 14th Street-Canarsie Line; some southbound trains also short-turn at Myrtle-Wyckoff Avenues during rush hours. It is also the first subway line to be fully automated, using communications-based train control rather than block signaling, which most of the system currently uses. Starting April 27, 2019, and continuing until mid-2020, service will be limited between Third Avenue and Bedford Avenue on late nights and weekends to allow for repairs on the Canarsie Line tunnels under the East River, which were badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The original plans called for a full 15-month closure similar to the repairs done on the Montague Street tunnel, which carries the R, but the plans were revised in January 2019.2019 to a longer project that saw single-tracking on weekends.\\
The L uses a mix of CBTC compatible R143 and R160 cars.



* '''1 - Broadway-Seventh Avenue Local''': The 1 is the local service on the Seventh Avenue Line. It operates at all times between Van Cortlandt Park–242nd Street in the Bronx and South Ferry in Lower Manhattan, with some northbound rush hour trains terminating at either 238th Street, 168th Street, or 137th Street-City College. From 1989 to 2005, the 1 ran in a skip-stop service pattern during rush hours, with a separate route called the 9 providing complementary skip-stop service on the same route.
* '''2 - White Plains-Seventh Avenue Express''': The 2 operates at all times between Wakefield-241st Street in the Bronx and Flatbush Avenue–Brooklyn College in Brooklyn, making all stops in the Bronx (on the White Plains Road Line) and Brooklyn (on the Eastern Parkway and Nostrand Avenue Lines). During the daytime, the 2 runs express in Manhattan and local elsewhere, while late night service operates local along the entire route. During rush hours, some put-ins originate/terminate at either Utica or New Lots Avenues due to capacity issues at Flatbush Avenue, as well as a switching bottleneck east of the Franklin Avenue stop, where trains can either continue along Eastern Parkway or diverge to the Nostrand Avenue Line.
* '''3 - Lenox-Seventh Avenue Express''': The 3 operates between 148th Street in Harlem, Manhattan and New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn, making express stops in Manhattan and all stops in Brooklyn. During late nights, the 3 runs only between 148th Street and Times Square. Previously, the 3 ran only as a shuttle between 148th Street and 135th Street during late nights, but this caused frequent switching delays along the Lenox Avenue Line, and in 2008, the 3 was extended to Times Square.

to:

* '''1 - Broadway-Seventh Avenue Local''': The 1 is the local service on the Seventh Avenue Line. It operates at all times between Van Cortlandt Park–242nd Street in the Bronx and South Ferry in Lower Manhattan, with some northbound rush hour trains terminating at either 238th Street, 168th Street, or 137th Street-City College. From 1989 to 2005, the 1 ran in a skip-stop service pattern during rush hours, with a separate route called the 9 providing complementary skip-stop service on the same route.
route.\\
The 1 train fleet is entirely composed of R62A cars.
* '''2 - White Plains-Seventh Avenue Express''': The 2 operates at all times between Wakefield-241st Street in the Bronx and Flatbush Avenue–Brooklyn College in Brooklyn, making all stops in the Bronx (on the White Plains Road Line) and Brooklyn (on the Eastern Parkway and Nostrand Avenue Lines). During the daytime, the 2 runs express in Manhattan and local elsewhere, while late night service operates local along the entire route. During rush hours, some put-ins originate/terminate at either Utica or New Lots Avenues due to capacity issues at Flatbush Avenue, as well as a switching bottleneck east of the Franklin Avenue stop, where trains can either continue along Eastern Parkway or diverge to the Nostrand Avenue Line.
Line.\\
The 2 train fleet is entirely composed of R142 cars, and is the only line on the West Side IRT to use them.
* '''3 - Lenox-Seventh Avenue Express''': The 3 operates between 148th Street in Harlem, Manhattan and New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn, making express stops in Manhattan and all stops in Brooklyn. During late nights, the 3 runs only between 148th Street and Times Square. Previously, the 3 ran only as a shuttle between 148th Street and 135th Street during late nights, but this caused frequent switching delays along the Lenox Avenue Line, and in 2008, the 3 was extended to Times Square.\\
The 3 train fleet is made up of R62 and R62A cars stationed at Livonia Yard.



* '''4 - Jerome-Lexington Avenue Express''': The 4 operates between Woodlawn in the Bronx and Utica Avenue in Crown Heights, Brooklyn at all times except nights. During late nights, 4 trains serve all stops except Hoyt Street and are extended to/from New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn as a replacement for the 3. During rush hours only, 4 trains skip 138th Street–Grand Concourse in the peak direction, with some northbound trains running express north of 167th Street and short turning at Burnside Avenue, as well as a limited number of trains coming to/from New Lots Avenue for storage at Livonia Yard.
* '''5 - Dyre-Lexington Avenue Express''': The 5 operates between Dyre Avenue in Eastchester, Bronx and Brooklyn College in Flatbush, Brooklyn, making all stops in the Bronx and running express elsewhere on weekdays except evenings and weekends. It also runs express in the Bronx between East 180th Street and 3rd Avenue–149th Street in the peak direction during rush hours, with some rush hour service coming to/from Nereid Avenue in Wakefield, Bronx. The 5 short turns at Bowling Green in lower Manhattan on evenings and weekends, and becomes a shuttle-only service between Dyre Avenue and East 180th Street during late nights. Limited rush hour service also operates to/from either Utica or New Lots Avenues in Brooklyn due to capacity issues at Flatbush Avenue, as well as a switching bottleneck east of the Franklin Avenue stop, where trains can either continue along Eastern Parkway or diverge to the Nostrand Avenue Line.
* '''6 - Pelham-Lexington Avenue Local / <6> - Pelham Express-Lexington Avenue Local''': The 6 is the local service on the Lexington Avenue Line. It operates local at all times between Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx and Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall in Lower Manhattan. Some trains run express in the peak direction between Parkchester and 3rd Avenue-138th Street and are marked as <6>, while locals are marked in a circular bullet. During weekdays in the peak direction, <6> Pelham Express trains replace 6 local ones north of Parkchester, and run express between that station and 3rd Avenue–138th Street. During this time, 6 Pelham Local trains short turn at Parkchester. Weekdays from 9 AM to 11 AM, select Manhattan-bound <6> trains run local from Parkchester to Hunts Point Avenue while select Parkchester-bound 6 trains run express in that section.

to:

* '''4 - Jerome-Lexington Avenue Express''': The 4 operates between Woodlawn in the Bronx and Utica Avenue in Crown Heights, Brooklyn at all times except nights. During late nights, 4 trains serve all stops except Hoyt Street and are extended to/from New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn as a replacement for the 3. During rush hours only, 4 trains skip 138th Street–Grand Concourse in the peak direction, with some northbound trains running express north of 167th Street and short turning at Burnside Avenue, as well as a limited number of trains coming to/from New Lots Avenue for storage at Livonia Yard.
Yard.\\
The 4 train is operated with R142 and R142A cars. It is the only line to use R142A cars, thanks to the R142A cars on the 6 train being converted to R188 cars for the IRT Flushing Line.
* '''5 - Dyre-Lexington Avenue Express''': The 5 operates between Dyre Avenue in Eastchester, Bronx and Brooklyn College in Flatbush, Brooklyn, making all stops in the Bronx and running express elsewhere on weekdays except evenings and weekends. It also runs express in the Bronx between East 180th Street and 3rd Avenue–149th Street in the peak direction during rush hours, with some rush hour service coming staying on the IRT White Plains Road Line to/from Nereid Avenue in Wakefield, Bronx.supplementing the 2 train. The 5 short turns at Bowling Green in lower Manhattan on evenings and weekends, and becomes a shuttle-only service between Dyre Avenue and East 180th Street during late nights. Limited rush hour service also operates to/from either Utica or New Lots Avenues in Brooklyn due to capacity issues at Flatbush Avenue, as well as a switching bottleneck at Rogers Junction east of the Franklin Avenue stop, where trains can either continue along Eastern Parkway or diverge to the Nostrand Avenue Line.
Line.\\
The 5 train fleet is made up entirely of R142 cars, stationed out of East 180th Street and 239th Street Yards. The fleet is shared between it and the 2 train. Because the two lines have so much overlap in the Bronx and Brooklyn, and only separate for their trips through Manhattan, much frustration has ensued thanks to the electronic strip maps in the trains only having the map for one route or the other. To solve this problem, the MTA began replacing the individual strip maps for cars assigned to these yards in 2016, with combined strip maps showing both services.
* '''6 - Pelham-Lexington Avenue Local / <6> - Pelham Express-Lexington Avenue Local''': The 6 is the local service on the Lexington Avenue Line. It operates local at all times between Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx and Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall in Lower Manhattan. Some trains run express in the peak direction between Parkchester and 3rd Avenue-138th Street and are marked as <6>, while locals are marked in a circular bullet. During weekdays in the peak direction, <6> Pelham Express trains replace 6 local ones north of Parkchester, and run express between that station and 3rd Avenue–138th Street.Street, only stopping at Hunts Point Avenue along the route. During this time, 6 Pelham Local trains short turn at Parkchester. Weekdays from 9 AM to 11 AM, select Manhattan-bound <6> trains run local from Parkchester to Hunts Point Avenue while select Parkchester-bound 6 trains run express in that section. The 6 train is operated with a fleet of R62A cars, which were displaced from the line from 2001 to 2003 by the R142A cars and moved to the IRT Flushing Line to retire that line's Redbird trains. However, the change only lasted for 13 years before the R62A trains were transferred back to the 6 as part of the Flushing Line automation program, and the 6's R142A trains were given to the 7 to be converted to R188 cars.



* '''7 - Flushing Local / <7> - Flushing Express''': The 7 operates between 34th Street-Hudson Yards and Main Street in Flushing, Queens at all times. During weekdays, some trips are designated as <7> Flushing Express, and run express between Queensboro Plaza and Main Street in the peak direction only during rush hours. It is the only IRT route to service Queens and, along with the 3 and 42nd Street Shuttle, one of only three IRT routes to not service the Bronx. In addition to regular local and rush-hour express services, "Super Express" service to Manhattan is also provided after New York Mets games weeknights and weekends at Citi Field, as well as after US Open tennis matches: starting at Mets–Willets Point and operating express to Manhattan, also bypassing Junction Boulevard, Hunters Point Avenue and Vernon Boulevard–Jackson Avenue. Because the 7 was the principal subway route to the 1964-65 New York World's Fair and traverses through several different ethnic neighborhoods populated by immigrants in Queens, it is unofficially nicknamed the "International Express."

to:

* '''7 - Flushing Local / <7> - Flushing Express''': The 7 operates between 34th Street-Hudson Yards and Main Street in Flushing, Queens at all times. During weekdays, some trips are designated as <7> Flushing Express, and run express between Queensboro Plaza and Main Street in the peak direction only during rush hours. It is the only IRT route to service Queens and, along with the 3 and 42nd Street Shuttle, one of only three IRT routes to not service the Bronx. In addition to regular local and rush-hour express services, "Super Express" service to Manhattan is also provided after New York Mets games weeknights and weekends at Citi Field, as well as after US Open tennis matches: starting at Mets–Willets Point and operating express to Manhattan, also bypassing Junction Boulevard, Hunters Point Avenue and Vernon Boulevard–Jackson Avenue. Because the 7 was the principal subway route to the 1964-65 New York World's Fair and traverses through several different ethnic neighborhoods populated by immigrants in Queens, it is unofficially nicknamed the "International Express.""\\
Unlike the other IRT lines, the 7 train is unique for running 11 car trains instead of the normal ten car trains. This has been in place since the 1964-1965 World's Fair in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in April 1964, when trains were lengthened to eleven cars. The Flushing Line received 430 new R33 and R36 "World's Fair" cars for this enhanced service, and due to platform lengths, it was chosen to maintain the existing train length. Note though that while 7 trains have the most cars of any in-service trains, they are ''not'' the longest trains on the system in overall length as they are still shorter than 600 foot long IND and BMT mainline trains.\\
The 7 is also unique for having the only cross-platform transfer to a B Division service, as it has a cross-platform exchange with the BMT Astoria Line at Queensboro Plaza. This is a remnant of the complicated [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queensboro_Plaza_station Dual Contracts]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual_Contracts history]] under which the IRT and BMT co-shared the Astoria and Flushing Lines. \\
The 7 train fleet is entirely made of R188 cars.



* '''42nd Street Shuttle''': The IRT shuttle service runs at all times except late nights, connecting Times Square to Grand Central under 42nd Street (for late night service between Times Square and Grand Central, the 7 supplements it). It is the shortest regular service in the system, running about 3,000 feet (910 m) in under two minutes. Also, in order to distinguish it from the other shuttles in the system, NYCT Rapid Transit Operations internally refers to it as the 0 (zero).
* '''Franklin Avenue Shuttle''': The BMT shuttle service uses the Franklin Avenue Line exclusively. The north terminus is Franklin Avenue (with a free transfer to the Fulton Street Line), with the south terminus being Prospect Park (with transfer and track connections to the Brighton Line). The shuttle runs One Person Train Operation (OPTO), with the motorman also being the conductor - they will go to the opposite end to make another run at each terminal. Also, in order to distinguish it from the other shuttles in the system, NYCT Rapid Transit Operations internally refers to it as the S. Previously, the shuttle ran to Coney Island during summers, but years of neglect and declining ridership have led the MTA to consider tearing down the right-of-way and replace it with bus service in the 1980s, though these attempts were met with local opposition. The MTA then rehabilitated the line in 1999 to upgrade the infrastructure with new tracks, platforms and signals.
* '''Rockaway Park Shuttle''': The IND shuttle service connects with the A at the Broad Channel station and utilizes the Rockaway Line's Rockaway Park branch, terminating at Beach 116th Street at all times (though some A trains come to/from Rockaway Park during rush hours in the peak direction). Also, in order to distinguish it from the other shuttles in the system, NYCT Rapid Transit Operations internally refers to it as the H, though the shuttle was designated that letter at various times in the past. Throughout its history, this service was extended to Euclid Avenue and/or Far Rockaway, serving as a replacement for other services that didn't run during off-peak hours.

to:

* '''42nd Street Shuttle''': The IRT shuttle service runs at all times except late nights, connecting Times Square to Grand Central under 42nd Street (for late night service between Times Square and Grand Central, the 7 supplements it). It is the shortest regular service in the system, running about 3,000 feet (910 m) in under two minutes. Also, in order to distinguish it from the other shuttles in the system, NYCT Rapid Transit Operations internally refers to it as the 0 (zero).
(zero). It uses short trains of R62A cars.
* '''Franklin Avenue Shuttle''': The BMT shuttle service uses the Franklin Avenue Line exclusively. The north terminus is Franklin Avenue (with a free transfer to the Fulton Street Line), with the south terminus being Prospect Park (with transfer and track connections to the Brighton Line). The shuttle runs One Person Train Operation (OPTO), with the motorman also being the conductor - they will go to the opposite end to make another run at each terminal. Also, in order to distinguish it from the other shuttles in the system, NYCT Rapid Transit Operations internally refers to it as the S. Previously, the shuttle ran to Coney Island during summers, but years of neglect and declining ridership have led the MTA to consider tearing down the right-of-way and replace it with bus service in the 1980s, though these attempts were met with local opposition. The MTA then rehabilitated the line in 1999 to upgrade the infrastructure with new tracks, platforms and signals.
signals. The line uses its own fleet of R68 cars.
* '''Rockaway Park Shuttle''': The IND shuttle service connects with the A at the Broad Channel station and utilizes the Rockaway Line's Rockaway Park branch, terminating at Beach 116th Street at all times (though some A trains come to/from Rockaway Park during rush hours in the peak direction). Also, in order to distinguish it from the other shuttles in the system, NYCT Rapid Transit Operations internally refers to it as the H, though the shuttle was designated that letter at various times in the past. Throughout its history, this service was extended to Euclid Avenue and/or Far Rockaway, serving as a replacement for other services that didn't run during off-peak hours.
hours. During summer weekends, the shuttle runs all the way to Rockaway Boulevard on the mainland, allowing single transfers for A train passengers originating on the Lefferts Boulevard Branch. The Rockaway Park Shuttle uses its own fleet of R46 trains.



* '''Myrtle Avenue Shuttle''': This shuttle uses the Myrtle Avenue Line exclusively, running from Middle Village-Metropolitan Avenue to Myrtle Avenue–Broadway, and is designated as the M. It connects with the J at Myrtle Avenue–Broadway.

to:

* '''Myrtle Avenue Shuttle''': This Late nights, the M train operates exclusively as a shuttle uses on the Myrtle Avenue Line exclusively, Line, running from Middle Village-Metropolitan Avenue to Myrtle Avenue–Broadway, and is designated as the M.Avenue–Broadway. It connects with the J at Myrtle Avenue–Broadway.


* '''F - Jamaica Express-Sixth Avenue-Culver Local via 63rd Street''': The F operates at all times between 179th Street in Jamaica, Queens and Coney Island via the Culver Line, serving all stops except for an express section between 21st Street-Queensbridge and Forest Hills along the Queens Boulevard Line. Some trains short-turn at Kings Highway due to capacity issues at Coney Island during rush hours. Since the 2010s, there have been calls to restore express service from Jay Street to Church Avenue on the Culver Line during rush hours, although this has been controversial as some riders along the line fear they would lose their one-seat ride to Manhattan. Previously, the Culver Line had express service from Jay Street to Kings Highway between 1967 and 1987, but this was eliminated due to low patronage and budget cuts. A limited express service between Jay Street and Church Avenue is expected to start in September 2019, with two trains in the peak direction during rush hours, and will be represented with a diamond <F>, similar to the symbol used on other peak-direction express services.

to:

* '''F - Jamaica Express-Sixth Avenue-Culver Local via 63rd Street''': The F operates at all times between 179th Street in Jamaica, Queens and Coney Island via the Culver Line, serving all stops except for an express section between 21st Street-Queensbridge and Forest Hills along the Queens Boulevard Line. Some trains short-turn at Kings Highway due to capacity issues at Coney Island during rush hours. Since the 2010s, there have been calls to restore express service from Jay Street to Church Avenue on the Culver Line during rush hours, although this has been controversial as some riders along the line fear they would lose their one-seat ride to Manhattan. Previously, the Culver Line had express service from Jay Street to Kings Highway between 1967 and 1987, but this was eliminated due to low patronage and budget cuts. A limited express service between Jay Street and Church Avenue is expected to start in started on September 16, 2019, with two trains running in the peak direction during rush hours, and will be is represented with a diamond <F>, similar to the symbol used on the other peak-direction express services. services.


* Fare evasion remains an occasional problem, though not so much as it was in the past. This can take many forms, such as jumping or crawling under the turnstiles, tailgating, train surfing, unauthorized entry to places such as train yards or tunnels, and using the rear door on buses, and it always contributes to lost revenues. One method once used by fare beaters was token sucking, as they did this by jamming the token slot in an entrance gate with paper. A passenger would insert a token into the turnstile, be frustrated when it did not open the gate, and have to spend another token to enter at another gate. A token thief would then suck the token from the jammed slot with their mouth. This was done many times as long as nobody was around. Some station attendants sprinkled chili powder in the slots to discourage this. To crack down on fare dodgers, the MTA has implemented several measures, including adding police officers and CCTV cameras at high-risk areas, installing high entrance-exit turnstiles ([=HEETs=]) and gates, higher penalties for fare evasion, and replacing subway tokens with [=MetroCards=] in recent years.
* Litter accumulation is a perennial issue in the subway system. In the 1970s and 1980s, dirty trains and platforms, as well as graffiti, were a serious problem. The situation has improved since then, but the 2010 budget crisis, which caused over 100 of the cleaning staff to lose their jobs, threatened to curtail trash removal from the subway system. Sometimes, objects thrown on the tracks can touch the electrified third rail, resulting in a track fire, which in turn disrupts subway service. The litter also poses a health hazard, as this often attracts rats and other vermin. The MTA even tried to curtail littering by removing trash bins from several stations in 2011, but it didn't work out as intended, and it was abandoned in 2017.

to:

* Fare evasion remains an occasional problem, though not so much as it was in the past. This can take many forms, such as jumping or crawling under the turnstiles, tailgating, train surfing, unauthorized entry to places such as train yards or tunnels, and using the rear door on buses, and it always contributes to lost revenues. One method once used by fare beaters was token sucking, as they did this by jamming the token slot in an entrance gate with paper. A passenger would insert a token into the turnstile, be frustrated when it did not open the gate, and have to spend another token to enter at another gate. A token thief would then suck the token from the jammed slot with their mouth. This was done many times as long as nobody was around. Some station attendants sprinkled chili powder in the slots to discourage this. To crack down on fare dodgers, farebeating, the MTA has implemented several measures, including adding police officers and CCTV cameras at high-risk areas, installing high entrance-exit turnstiles ([=HEETs=]) and gates, higher penalties for fare evasion, and replacing subway tokens with [=MetroCards=] in recent years.
* Litter accumulation is a perennial issue in the subway system. In the 1970s and 1980s, dirty trains and platforms, as well as graffiti, were a serious problem. The situation has improved since then, but the 2010 budget crisis, which caused over 100 of the cleaning staff to lose their jobs, threatened to curtail trash removal from the subway system. Sometimes, objects thrown on the tracks can touch the electrified third rail, resulting in a track fire, which in turn disrupts subway service. The litter also poses a health hazard, as this often attracts rats and other vermin. The MTA even tried to curtail littering by removing trash bins from several stations in 2011, but it didn't work out as intended, intended and it was abandoned in 2017.


* '''1 - Broadway-Seventh Avenue Local''': The 1 is the local service on the Seventh Avenue Line. It operates local at all times between Van Cortlandt Park–242nd Street in Riverdale, Bronx and South Ferry in Lower Manhattan, with some northbound rush hour trains terminating at either 238th Street, 168th Street, or 137th Street-City College. From 1989 to 2005, the 1 ran in a skip-stop service pattern during rush hours, with a separate route called the 9 providing complementary skip-stop service on the same route.

to:

* '''1 - Broadway-Seventh Avenue Local''': The 1 is the local service on the Seventh Avenue Line. It operates local at all times between Van Cortlandt Park–242nd Street in Riverdale, the Bronx and South Ferry in Lower Manhattan, with some northbound rush hour trains terminating at either 238th Street, 168th Street, or 137th Street-City College. From 1989 to 2005, the 1 ran in a skip-stop service pattern during rush hours, with a separate route called the 9 providing complementary skip-stop service on the same route.



* '''3 - Lenox-Seventh Avenue Express''': The 3 operates between 148th Street in Harlem, Manhattan and New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn, making express stops in Manhattan and all stops in Brooklyn. During late nights, the 3 runs only between 148th Street and Times Square. Previously, the 3 ran only as a shuttle between 148th Street and 135th Street during late nights, but this caused frequent delays along the Lenox Avenue Line, and in 2008, the 3 was extended to Times Square.

to:

* '''3 - Lenox-Seventh Avenue Express''': The 3 operates between 148th Street in Harlem, Manhattan and New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn, making express stops in Manhattan and all stops in Brooklyn. During late nights, the 3 runs only between 148th Street and Times Square. Previously, the 3 ran only as a shuttle between 148th Street and 135th Street during late nights, but this caused frequent switching delays along the Lenox Avenue Line, and in 2008, the 3 was extended to Times Square.



* '''4 - Jerome-Lexington Avenue Express''': The 4 operates between Woodlawn in the Bronx and Utica Avenue in Crown Heights, Brooklyn at all times except nights. During late nights, 4 trains serve all stops except Hoyt Street and are extended to/from New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn as a replacement for the 3. During rush hours only, 4 trains skip 138th Street–Grand Concourse in the peak direction, with some northbound trains running express north of 167th Street and short turning at Burnside Avenue, as well as a limited number of trains coming to/from New Lots Avenue for storage at Livonia Avenue Yard.

to:

* '''4 - Jerome-Lexington Avenue Express''': The 4 operates between Woodlawn in the Bronx and Utica Avenue in Crown Heights, Brooklyn at all times except nights. During late nights, 4 trains serve all stops except Hoyt Street and are extended to/from New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn as a replacement for the 3. During rush hours only, 4 trains skip 138th Street–Grand Concourse in the peak direction, with some northbound trains running express north of 167th Street and short turning at Burnside Avenue, as well as a limited number of trains coming to/from New Lots Avenue for storage at Livonia Avenue Yard.



* '''6 - Pelham-Lexington Avenue Local / <6> - Pelham Express-Lexington Avenue Local''': The 6 is the local service on the Lexington Avenue Line. It operates local at all times between Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx and Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall in Lower Manhattan. Some trains run express in the peak direction between Parkchester and 3rd Avenue - 138th Street and are marked as <6>, while locals are marked in a circular bullet. During weekdays in the peak direction, <6> Pelham Express trains replace 6 local ones north of Parkchester, and run express between that station and 3rd Avenue–138th Street. During this time, 6 Pelham Local trains short turn at Parkchester. Weekdays from 9:00 to 11:00a.m., select Manhattan-bound <6> trains run local from Parkchester to Hunts Point Avenue while select Parkchester-bound 6 trains run express in that section.

to:

* '''6 - Pelham-Lexington Avenue Local / <6> - Pelham Express-Lexington Avenue Local''': The 6 is the local service on the Lexington Avenue Line. It operates local at all times between Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx and Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall in Lower Manhattan. Some trains run express in the peak direction between Parkchester and 3rd Avenue - 138th Avenue-138th Street and are marked as <6>, while locals are marked in a circular bullet. During weekdays in the peak direction, <6> Pelham Express trains replace 6 local ones north of Parkchester, and run express between that station and 3rd Avenue–138th Street. During this time, 6 Pelham Local trains short turn at Parkchester. Weekdays from 9:00 9 AM to 11:00a.m., 11 AM, select Manhattan-bound <6> trains run local from Parkchester to Hunts Point Avenue while select Parkchester-bound 6 trains run express in that section.



All shuttles are designated with the letter S, and are colored a darker shade of gray on the route bullet.

to:

All officially designated shuttles are designated with the letter S, and are colored a darker shade of gray on the route bullet.


Added DiffLines:


There are several late-night shuttles that are not designated with the letter S, but use other designations instead.
* '''Dyre Avenue Shuttle''': This shuttle uses the Dyre Avenue Line exclusively, running from Eastchester-Dyre Avenue to East 180th Street, and is designated as the 5. It connects with the 2 at East 180th Street.
* '''Lefferts Boulevard Shuttle''': This shuttle runs from Euclid Avenue to Lefferts Boulevard and is designated as the A (although the late night subway map designates the shuttle as the S). It operates concurrently with regular A service, which goes to Far Rockaway. Previously, the A ran to Lefferts Boulevard during late nights, while a shuttle ran between Euclid Avenue and Far Rockaway.
* '''Myrtle Avenue Shuttle''': This shuttle uses the Myrtle Avenue Line exclusively, running from Middle Village-Metropolitan Avenue to Myrtle Avenue–Broadway, and is designated as the M. It connects with the J at Myrtle Avenue–Broadway.


The NYC Subway is one of only four mass-transit systems in the United States that run 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.[[note]]The only others are the UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} [[UsefulNotes/ChicagoL "L"]] (and only on its Red and Blue Lines), PATH, and the PATCO Speedline (which connects UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} to its South Jersey suburbs). In all cases, schedules run far more frequently during the day (3-5 minute intervals on the NYC Subway) than late at night (20 minutes on the NYC Subway).[[/note]] The city that never sleeps, indeed.

to:

The NYC Subway is one of only four five mass-transit systems in the United States that run 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.[[note]]The only others are the UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} [[UsefulNotes/ChicagoL "L"]] (and only on its Red and Blue Lines), PATH, and the PATCO Speedline (which connects UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} to its South Jersey suburbs).suburbs), and Metro in the UsefulNotes/TwinCities (and only on its Green Line). Note also that the Twin Cities Metro, unlike all the other 24/7 lines in the US, is classified as light rail instead of rapid transit. In all cases, schedules run far more frequently during the day (3-5 minute intervals on the NYC Subway) than late at night (20 minutes on the NYC Subway).[[/note]] The city that never sleeps, indeed.


* '''F - Jamaica Express-Sixth Avenue-Culver Local via 63rd Street''': The F operates at all times between 179th Street in Jamaica, Queens and Coney Island via the Culver Line, serving all stops except for an express section between 21st Street-Queensbridge and Forest Hills along the Queens Boulevard Line. Some trains short-turn at Kings Highway due to capacity issues at Coney Island during rush hours. Since the 2010s, there have been calls to restore express service from Jay Street to Church Avenue on the Culver Line during rush hours, although this has been controversial as some riders along the line fear they would lose their one-seat ride to Manhattan. Previously, the Culver Line had express service from Jay Street to Kings Highway between 1967 and 1987, but this was eliminated due to low patronage and budget cuts.

to:

* '''F - Jamaica Express-Sixth Avenue-Culver Local via 63rd Street''': The F operates at all times between 179th Street in Jamaica, Queens and Coney Island via the Culver Line, serving all stops except for an express section between 21st Street-Queensbridge and Forest Hills along the Queens Boulevard Line. Some trains short-turn at Kings Highway due to capacity issues at Coney Island during rush hours. Since the 2010s, there have been calls to restore express service from Jay Street to Church Avenue on the Culver Line during rush hours, although this has been controversial as some riders along the line fear they would lose their one-seat ride to Manhattan. Previously, the Culver Line had express service from Jay Street to Kings Highway between 1967 and 1987, but this was eliminated due to low patronage and budget cuts. A limited express service between Jay Street and Church Avenue is expected to start in September 2019, with two trains in the peak direction during rush hours, and will be represented with a diamond <F>, similar to the symbol used on other peak-direction express services.


* Though vandalism remains an occasional problem, it isn't as much as it used to be during the subway's nadir. By the mid-2000s, a new form of vandalism had taken root: scratchiti. Instead of spray paint, taggers were using etching tools and acid to mar windows and stainless steel surfaces. Since then, treatment — including scratch-resistant window shields — has minimized the problem. Despite that, vandals still remain determined to damage subway equipment, whether by tagging [=MetroCard=] vending machines or etching on the subway cars.

to:

* Though vandalism remains an occasional problem, it isn't as much as it used to be was once during the subway's nadir. By the mid-2000s, a new form of vandalism had taken root: scratchiti. Instead of spray paint, taggers were using etching tools and acid to mar windows and stainless steel surfaces. Since then, treatment — including scratch-resistant window shields — has minimized the problem. Despite that, vandals still remain determined to damage subway equipment, whether by tagging [=MetroCard=] vending machines or etching on the subway cars.


* '''2 - White Plains-Seventh Avenue Express''': The 2 operates at all times between Wakefield-241st Street in the Bronx and Flatbush Avenue–Brooklyn College in Brooklyn, making all stops in the Bronx (on the White Plains Road Line) and Brooklyn (on the Eastern Parkway and Flatbush Avenue Lines). During the daytime, the 2 runs express in Manhattan and local elsewhere, while late night service operates local along the entire route. Some rush hour service also operates to/from either Utica or New Lots Avenues due to capacity issues at Flatbush Avenue.

to:

* '''2 - White Plains-Seventh Avenue Express''': The 2 operates at all times between Wakefield-241st Street in the Bronx and Flatbush Avenue–Brooklyn College in Brooklyn, making all stops in the Bronx (on the White Plains Road Line) and Brooklyn (on the Eastern Parkway and Flatbush Nostrand Avenue Lines). During the daytime, the 2 runs express in Manhattan and local elsewhere, while late night service operates local along the entire route. Some During rush hour service also operates to/from hours, some put-ins originate/terminate at either Utica or New Lots Avenues due to capacity issues at Flatbush Avenue.Avenue, as well as a switching bottleneck east of the Franklin Avenue stop, where trains can either continue along Eastern Parkway or diverge to the Nostrand Avenue Line.



* '''5 - Dyre-Lexington Avenue Express''': The 5 operates between Dyre Avenue in Eastchester, Bronx and Flatbush Avenue in Flatbush, Brooklyn, making all stops in the Bronx and running express elsewhere on weekdays except evenings and weekends. It also runs express in the Bronx between East 180th Street and 3rd Avenue–149th Street in the peak direction during rush hours, with some rush hour service coming to/from Nereid Avenue in Wakefield, Bronx. The 5 short turns at Bowling Green in lower Manhattan on evenings and weekends, and becomes a shuttle-only service between Dyre Avenue and East 180th Street during late nights. Limited rush hour service also operates to/from either Utica or New Lots Avenues in Brooklyn due to capacity issues at Flatbush Avenue.

to:

* '''5 - Dyre-Lexington Avenue Express''': The 5 operates between Dyre Avenue in Eastchester, Bronx and Flatbush Avenue Brooklyn College in Flatbush, Brooklyn, making all stops in the Bronx and running express elsewhere on weekdays except evenings and weekends. It also runs express in the Bronx between East 180th Street and 3rd Avenue–149th Street in the peak direction during rush hours, with some rush hour service coming to/from Nereid Avenue in Wakefield, Bronx. The 5 short turns at Bowling Green in lower Manhattan on evenings and weekends, and becomes a shuttle-only service between Dyre Avenue and East 180th Street during late nights. Limited rush hour service also operates to/from either Utica or New Lots Avenues in Brooklyn due to capacity issues at Flatbush Avenue.Avenue, as well as a switching bottleneck east of the Franklin Avenue stop, where trains can either continue along Eastern Parkway or diverge to the Nostrand Avenue Line.


* Similarly, Creator/JenniferLopez named her first album "On the 6" because she used to ride the 6 train from the Bronx into Manhattan while still trying to get her big break.

to:

* Similarly, Creator/JenniferLopez Music/JenniferLopez named her first album "On the 6" because she used to ride the 6 train from the Bronx into Manhattan while still trying to get her big break.


** When a retired [=LIRR=] worker stated he made roughly $500K in total pay (including overtime, benefits and salary), this has prompted multiple investigations as to why [[https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/17/nyregion/mta-overtime.html the MTA still uses]] an archaic practice of handwritten time sheets to log overtime when more modern timekeeping systems can be used to track daily attendance and detect fraud. Earlier attempts to automate the MTA's payroll records were kiboshed because managers feared pushback from employees. [[https://nypost.com/2019/05/17/feds-probe-mta-overtime-king-over-a-dozen-other-lirr-workers-report/ According to the New York Post]], the MTA spent $1.3 billion in overtime in 2018, up more than $100 million from the previous year.

to:

** When a retired [=LIRR=] worker stated he made roughly $500K in total pay (including overtime, benefits and salary), this has prompted multiple investigations as to why [[https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/17/nyregion/mta-overtime.html the MTA still uses]] an archaic practice of handwritten time sheets to log overtime when more modern timekeeping systems can be used to track daily attendance and detect fraud. Earlier attempts to automate the MTA's payroll records were kiboshed because managers feared pushback from employees. [[https://nypost.com/2019/05/17/feds-probe-mta-overtime-king-over-a-dozen-other-lirr-workers-report/ According to the New York Post]], the MTA spent $1.3 billion in overtime in 2018, up more than $100 million from the previous year.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 223

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report