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It was at one time common for cities, and not just large ones but also Anytown USA, to have ''two'' (or even more) local papers, one espousing support for conservative policies and the other more liberal (and ''all'' of them would probably publish both a morning and evening edition, at least during the week). In most places, the publishers finally decided that the market just wasn't large enough to support two papers and merged with their rivals (a trend that was largely complete a couple of decades ago), which is why most U.S. newspapers today have names like "The Smallville Sun-Dispatch" or "The Metropolis Globe-Tribune".

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It was at one time common for cities, and not just large ones but also Anytown USA, Anytown, U.S.A., to have ''two'' (or even more) local papers, one espousing support for conservative policies and the other more liberal (and ''all'' of them would probably publish both a morning and evening edition, at least during the week). edition between Monday and Saturday). In most places, the publishers finally decided that the market just wasn't large enough to support two papers and merged with their rivals (a decades-long trend that was largely complete a couple of decades ago), in the 1990s), which is why most U.S. newspapers today have names like "The Smallville Sun-Dispatch" or "The Metropolis Globe-Tribune".



* ''USA Today'' -- Famed for its colorful charts and graphs and their sports section's heavy emphasis on college and high school sports polling in association with Creator/{{ESPN}}, otherwise just a bland collection of wire reports, although it's also the only public outlet where the full weekly Nielsen UsefulNotes/{{Ratings}} chart is disseminated in any form. Has the highest circulation of any American newspaper, due to its publisher Gannett owning many local papers around the country (which print digested news sections of ''USA Today'' because of budget cuts which allow Gannett to have their local staffs focus on local news) and adding to its aggressive availability; one technique is to convince hotel chains to deliver one free to each room every day. That adds up to a ''lot'' of newspapers. It is also worth noting that, while it is frequently derided as lightweight journalism (it's sometimes called the "[=McPaper=]"), it has broken a few important stories in recent years. For its first 30 years it rarely editorialized about political issues (which added to its reputation as a "banal" outlet), although beginning in the 2010s it began taking a rather soft liberal slant (nonetheless, its editorials began carrying rebuttals, which have gotten positive attention), condemning the GOP for the 2013 federal shut-down and the 2015 immigration revolt in Congress. In 2016, it "un-endorsed" presidential candidate Donald Trump, a first for the newspaper.

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* ''USA Today'' -- Famed for its colorful charts and graphs and their sports section's heavy emphasis on college and high school sports polling in association with Creator/{{ESPN}}, otherwise just a bland collection of wire reports, although it's also the only public outlet where the full weekly Nielsen UsefulNotes/{{Ratings}} chart is disseminated in any form. Has the highest circulation of any American newspaper, due to its publisher Gannett owning many local papers around the country (which print digested news sections of ''USA Today'' because of budget cuts which allow Gannett to have their local staffs focus on local news) and adding to its aggressive availability; one technique is to convince hotel chains to deliver one free to each room every day. That adds up to a ''lot'' of newspapers. It is also worth noting that, while it is frequently derided as lightweight journalism (it's sometimes called the "[=McPaper=]"), it has broken a few important stories in recent years. For its first 30 years it rarely editorialized about political issues (which added to its reputation as a "banal" outlet), although beginning in the 2010s it began taking a rather soft liberal slant (nonetheless, its editorials began carrying rebuttals, which have gotten positive attention), condemning the GOP for the 2013 federal shut-down and the 2015 immigration revolt in Congress.Congress among other issues. In 2016, it "un-endorsed" presidential candidate Donald Trump, a first for the newspaper.



* Some consider the ''Christian Science Monitor'' to be the third national paper in the United States. As it is published by the UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}-based First Church of Christ, Scientist, some may consider it a ''cult''-based newspaper like the ''Washington Times''. [[note]]This follows a standard rule most people use in thinking about religion, if it's small and has wacky beliefs that harm people, it's a cult.[[/note]] As it is run by a nonprofit, it cherishes its independence from the for-profit model and as such, its non-religion articles are generally well written and the publication is widely admired in the journalism field. (Only one proselytizing article per day runs.) Went from a daily printing model to a hybrid weekly printing/online all week model in 2009.

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* Some consider the ''Christian Science Monitor'' to be the third national paper in the United States. As it is published by the UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}-based First Church of Christ, Scientist, some may consider it a ''cult''-based newspaper like the ''Washington Times''. [[note]]This follows a standard rule most people use in thinking about religion, if it's small and has wacky beliefs that harm small, it's intolerant regarding other people, and/or stifles their believers' freedoms, it's a cult.[[/note]] As it is run by a nonprofit, it cherishes its independence from the for-profit model and as such, its non-religion articles are generally well written well-written and the publication is widely admired in the journalism field. (Only one proselytizing article per day runs.) Went from a daily printing model to a hybrid weekly printing/online all week model week-model in 2009.



* ''Chicago Sun-Times'' -- Tabloid, more liberal rival to the ''Tribune''. Notable for the late film critic Creator/RogerEbert, and being the newspaper in the show ''Series/EarlyEdition''. It was owned by Murdoch for a time in the 80s (and by an associate afterwards) and later by Conrad Black in the 90s (also leaning to the right), but this era is considered to be an OldShame.
* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last fifteen years due to bad management from the Tribune Company. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000. In 2018 was sold to local businessman Patrick Soon-Shiong[[note]]who was actually born in ''South Africa''[[/note]].
* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Inquirer''--Note it's an "I," not an "E" like the tabloid. The ''Inky'' to its friends, it's the third-oldest surviving newspaper in the US (founded 1829 as ''The Pennsylvania Inquirer''). It's had a roller-coaster history, cycling between national prominence and local rag status. It's currently in a local-rag phase; its last period of major national prominence was the period from about 1975 to 1995, when it won a number of Pulitzers and broke all kinds of significant national stories (one of the last major ones being a scandal about a charity supposedly providing care packages to soldiers in the UsefulNotes/GulfWar being used to scam donors). The ''Inquirer'' also owns the ''Philadelphia Daily News'', a populist tabloid (explicitly calling itself "The People's Paper" and advertising itself as "Philadelphia's pain in the a[[spoiler:ss]] since 1925") that nevertheless manages to be halfway respectable (probably because of its more-or-less common editorial line with the ''Inquirer''; it's also definitely more like the ''New York Daily News'' than the ''New York Post'' in other aspects as well), and also runs the local-news website Philly.com, which has a surprisingly high national profile online for a local site.

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* ''Chicago Sun-Times'' -- Tabloid, more liberal rival to the ''Tribune''. Notable for the late film critic Creator/RogerEbert, and being the newspaper in the show ''Series/EarlyEdition''. It was owned by Murdoch for a time in the 80s (and by an associate afterwards) and later by Conrad Black in the 90s (also leaning to the right), 90s, becoming a bastion of conservatism, but this era is considered to be an OldShame.
* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last fifteen years due to bad management from the Tribune Company. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000. In 2018 was sold to local businessman Patrick Soon-Shiong[[note]]who was actually born in ''South Africa''[[/note]].
Africa''.[[/note]].
* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Inquirer''--Note Inquirer'' -- Note it's an "I," not an "E" like the tabloid. The ''Inky'' to its friends, it's the third-oldest surviving newspaper in the US (founded 1829 as ''The Pennsylvania Inquirer''). It's had a roller-coaster history, cycling between national prominence and local rag status. It's currently in a local-rag phase; its last period of major national prominence was the period from about 1975 to 1995, when it won a number of Pulitzers and broke all kinds of significant national stories (one of the last major ones being a scandal about a charity supposedly providing care packages to soldiers in the UsefulNotes/GulfWar being used to scam donors). The ''Inquirer'' also owns the ''Philadelphia Daily News'', a populist tabloid (explicitly calling itself "The People's Paper" and advertising itself as "Philadelphia's pain in the a[[spoiler:ss]] a** since 1925") that nevertheless manages to be halfway half-way respectable (probably because of its more-or-less common editorial line with the ''Inquirer''; it's also definitely more like the ''New York Daily News'' than the ''New York Post'' in other aspects as well), and also runs the local-news website well). Both papers' contents appear on Philly.com, which has a surprisingly high national profile online nationwide for a local site.locally-based news website.



* ''The Boston Globe'' -- The paper of record for the entirety of New England. It is currently owned by John Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox.[[note]]And much else; Henry's Fenway Sports Group also owns [[BritishFootyTeams Liverpool F.C.]], half of a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} team, and UsefulNotes/LeBronJames' marketing rights, plus a whole bunch of other stuff besides.[[/note]] Well known for its Spotlight investigative journalism team, whose Pultizer Prize-winning work investigating the sex abuse scandal in the city's Catholic churches was turned into an [[Film/{{Spotlight}} Oscar-winning film]]. Has its own online AlternativeRock radio station, [=RadioBDC=], a spiritual successor to the city's defunct but storied rock station WFNX. Boston is also one of the last remaining two newspaper cities; The ''Globe'' shares Beantown with the older but less-read tabloid ''Boston Herald'' (It used to be considered a ''three'' paper town, with the alt-weekly ''Boston Phoenix'' being equally highly regarded, but it was shuttered in 2013).

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* ''The Boston Globe'' -- The paper of record for the entirety of New England. It is currently owned by John Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox.[[note]]And much else; Henry's Fenway Sports Group also owns [[BritishFootyTeams Liverpool F.C.]], half of a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} team, and UsefulNotes/LeBronJames' marketing rights, plus a whole bunch of other stuff besides.[[/note]] Well known for its Spotlight investigative journalism team, whose Pultizer Pulitzer Prize-winning work investigating the sex abuse scandal in the city's Catholic churches was turned into an [[Film/{{Spotlight}} Oscar-winning film]]. Has its own online AlternativeRock radio station, [=RadioBDC=], a spiritual successor to the city's defunct but storied rock station WFNX. Boston is also one of the last remaining two newspaper cities; The ''Globe'' shares Beantown with the older but less-read tabloid ''Boston Herald'' (It used to be considered a ''three'' paper ''three''-paper town, with the alt-weekly ''Boston Phoenix'' being equally highly regarded, highly-regarded, but it was shuttered in 2013).



* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Post'' and ''(Denver) Rocky Mountain News'' -- Denver was also a two-paper town. The ''Post'''s sportswriter, Woody Paige, appears on ESPN's ''Around the Horn''. The News was placed for sale by its owner, the E.W. Scripps company, in December 2008. Due to the economic crisis, there were no takers. Publication ceased on February 27, 2009. It was a TearJerker moment for a good number of people (not only employees of course). (Scripps has returned to Denver, though; they acquired the TV stations formerly owned by [=McGraw-Hill=] in 2012, including the flagship, Denver's 7ABC, KMGH.)

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* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Post'' and ''(Denver) Rocky Mountain News'' -- Denver was also a two-paper town. The ''Post'''s sportswriter, Woody Paige, appears on ESPN's ''Around the Horn''. The News was placed for sale by its owner, the E.W. Scripps company, in December 2008. Due to the economic crisis, there were no takers. Publication ceased on February 27, 2009. It was a TearJerker moment for a good number of people (not only employees employees, of course). (Scripps has returned to Denver, though; they acquired the TV stations formerly owned by [=McGraw-Hill=] in 2012, including the flagship, Denver's 7ABC, KMGH.)



* ''The New Hampshire Union Leader'' -- Formerly the ''Manchester'' Union-Leader (note the dropped hyphen as well). Otherwise typical regional paper that rises to prominence once every four years just before the beginning of the Presidential primary season, on the back of its home state's first-in-the-nation primary. Under its former publisher, William Loeb, it was one of the leading conservative papers in the United States.
* The ''Des Moines Register'' is likewise another local paper that enters national news consciousness due to the Iowa caucuses being the first chance ''anyone'' gets to vote in the deathmarch to the White House. They're also known for sponsoring the only long-distance event in all of cycling where riders can expect to ''gain'' weight.

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* ''The New The ''New Hampshire Union Leader'' -- Formerly the ''Manchester'' Union-Leader (note the dropped hyphen as well). Otherwise typical regional paper that rises to prominence once every four years just before the beginning of the Presidential primary season, on the back of its home state's first-in-the-nation primary. Under its former publisher, William Loeb, it was became one of the leading conservative papers in the United States.
States, although it began to take a more libertarian position during the 2010s. Its Sunday edition is known as the ''New Hampshire Sunday News''.
* The ''Des Moines Register'' is likewise another local paper that enters national news consciousness due to the Iowa caucuses being the first chance ''anyone'' gets to vote in the deathmarch death-march to the White House. They're also known for sponsoring the only long-distance event in all of cycling where riders can expect to ''gain'' weight.



* The ''Houston Chronicle'', which is the paper of record for America's fourth largest city. It is currently the flagship paper for the Hearst Communications empire and is one of the biggest papers, in terms of the size of its staff, in a non-coastal city.

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* The ''Houston Chronicle'', which is the paper of record for America's fourth largest fourth-largest city. It is currently the flagship paper for the Hearst Communications empire and is one of the biggest papers, in terms of the size of its staff, in a non-coastal city.



* The ''Providence Journal'', the largest paper in Rhode Island (and one of just three dailies in the whole state), is a similarly venerable New England paper that lays claim to being the "oldest ''continuously-published '''daily''''' newspaper" in those ExactWords (the ''Courant'' is older, but wasn't a weekly when it was founded. The ''New York Post'' has been a daily since 1801, but it was forced to stop publishing during two mid-20th century newspaper strikes). The ''[=ProJo=]'' as it is called in the area, is well regarded in Rhode Island despite a series of lay-offs that has greatly reduced the size of its newsroom. It's owned by Gatehouse Media, which also owns the second largest daily in the state (''The Newport Daily News'' down south in Newport) and several smaller weeklies and magazines.
* The ''Times-Picayune'' is the newspaper for New Orleans. Most notable in the past few decades for its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2006, but also for the period between 2012 and 2014 when it moved from daily publication to thrice-weekly; That resulted in New Orleans becoming the largest city in the United States (and the first major metro area) without a daily newspaper[[note]]If you're wondering what city is now the largest without a daily, that would be Birmingham, Alabama, whose ''Birmingham News'' is a sister paper of the ''Times-Picayune'' that underwent the thrice-weekly publication change at the same time, but hasn't reverted as of 2018.[[/note]], a very unpopular decision that was reversed soon thereafter: an "early Sunday" edition appeared on Saturday evenings while the other days of the week were covered by a tabloid edition. Also, Baton Rouge's ''The Advocate'' extended to NOLA in the meantime, making the "Big Easy" a two-paper town for the first time since 1980.

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* The ''Providence Journal'', the largest paper in Rhode Island (and one of just three dailies in the whole state), is a similarly venerable New England paper that lays claim to being the "oldest ''continuously-published '''daily''''' newspaper" in those ExactWords (the ''Courant'' is older, but wasn't it was a weekly when it was founded. The ''New York Post'' has been a daily since 1801, but it was forced to stop publishing during two mid-20th century newspaper strikes). The ''[=ProJo=]'' as it is called in the area, is well regarded in Rhode Island despite a series of lay-offs that has greatly reduced the size of its newsroom. It's owned by Gatehouse Media, which also owns the second largest second-largest daily in the state (''The Newport Daily News'' down south in Newport) and several smaller weeklies and magazines.
* The ''Times-Picayune'' is the newspaper for New Orleans. Most notable in the past few decades for its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2006, but also for the period between 2012 and 2014 when it moved from daily publication to thrice-weekly; That resulted in New Orleans becoming the largest city in the United States (and the first major metro area) without a daily newspaper[[note]]If you're wondering what city is now the largest without a daily, that would be Birmingham, Alabama, whose ''Birmingham News'' is a sister paper of the ''Times-Picayune'' that underwent the thrice-weekly publication change at the same time, but hasn't reverted as of 2018.[[/note]], a very unpopular decision that was reversed soon thereafter: an "early Sunday" edition appeared on Saturday evenings while the other days of the week were covered by a tabloid edition.edition, before reverting to a seven-day broadsheet in 2014. Also, Baton Rouge's ''The Advocate'' extended to NOLA in the meantime, making the "Big Easy" a two-paper town for the first time since 1980.



* ''Stars and Stripes'' is the newspaper of the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks U.S. Armed Forces]]. It is published under the auspices of the Department of Defense, though it maintains editorial independence, and is generally available in and around every major U.S. base in the world.
* ''The Examiner'' -- Formerly known as the ''San Francisco Examiner'', it gained fame in the late 19th century by being an early example of sensationalism and muckracking that eventually launched the Hearst empire. After becoming an evening paper in 1965 after an agreement with the rival ''Chronicle'', it lost prominence and Hearst Corp. sold the paper in 2000 (buying the ''Chron'' from the de Young family). The paper was acquired by the Fang family, which turned it into the modern-day freesheet in 2003. It was then sold to the Anschutz family's Clarity Media in 2004, the new owners establishing free dailies in Washington and Baltimore under the ''Examiner'' banner, although the former became a conservative magazine in 2013 and the latter shut down in 2009. The free ''Examiner'' (which was spun off from Clarity Media in 2011, being sold to administration) is generally thought as a 'wire service regurgitation' title as you can get. Mostly known on the Internet though for their website which publishes paid stories for many metro areas in the United States. The keyword sadly, being '''paid''', as the "stories" are often poorly written, barely sourced, sometimes plagiarized and in a few cases, even are pushed on forum sites for writers desperate for clicks; on quite a few sites like Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the Examiner site is blacklisted from being used as a reliable source.

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* ''Stars and Stripes'' is the -- The newspaper of the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks U.S. Armed Forces]]. It is published under the auspices of the Department of Defense, though it maintains editorial independence, and is generally available in and around every major U.S. base in the world.
* ''The Examiner'' -- Formerly known as the ''San Francisco Examiner'', it gained fame in the late 19th century by being an early example of sensationalism and muckracking muck-racking that eventually launched the Hearst empire. After becoming an evening paper in 1965 after an agreement with the rival ''Chronicle'', it lost prominence and Hearst Corp. sold the paper in 2000 (buying the ''Chron'' from the de Young family). The paper was acquired by the Fang family, which turned it into the modern-day freesheet in 2003. It was then sold to the Anschutz family's Clarity Media in 2004, the new owners establishing free dailies in Washington and Baltimore under the ''Examiner'' banner, although the former became a conservative magazine in 2013 and the latter shut down in 2009. The free ''Examiner'' (which was spun off from Clarity Media in 2011, being sold to administration) is generally thought as a 'wire service regurgitation' title as you can get. Mostly known on the Internet though for their website which publishes paid stories for many metro areas in the United States. The keyword sadly, being '''paid''', as the "stories" are often poorly written, barely sourced, sometimes plagiarized and in a few cases, even are pushed on forum sites for writers desperate for clicks; on quite a few sites like Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the Examiner site is blacklisted from being used as a reliable source.


* ''The Boston Globe'' -- The paper of record for the entirety of New England. It is currently owned by John Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox. Well known for its Spotlight investigative journalism team, whose Pultizer Prize-winning work investigating the sex abuse scandal in the city's Catholic churches was turned into an [[Film/{{Spotlight}} Oscar-winning film]]. Has its own online AlternativeRock radio station, [=RadioBDC=], a spiritual successor to the city's defunct but storied rock station WFNX. Boston is also one of the last remaining two newspaper cities; The ''Globe'' shares Beantown with the older but less-read tabloid ''Boston Herald'' (It used to be considered a ''three'' paper town, with the alt-weekly ''Boston Phoenix'' being equally highly regarded, but it was shuttered in 2013).

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* ''The Boston Globe'' -- The paper of record for the entirety of New England. It is currently owned by John Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox. [[note]]And much else; Henry's Fenway Sports Group also owns [[BritishFootyTeams Liverpool F.C.]], half of a UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} team, and UsefulNotes/LeBronJames' marketing rights, plus a whole bunch of other stuff besides.[[/note]] Well known for its Spotlight investigative journalism team, whose Pultizer Prize-winning work investigating the sex abuse scandal in the city's Catholic churches was turned into an [[Film/{{Spotlight}} Oscar-winning film]]. Has its own online AlternativeRock radio station, [=RadioBDC=], a spiritual successor to the city's defunct but storied rock station WFNX. Boston is also one of the last remaining two newspaper cities; The ''Globe'' shares Beantown with the older but less-read tabloid ''Boston Herald'' (It used to be considered a ''three'' paper town, with the alt-weekly ''Boston Phoenix'' being equally highly regarded, but it was shuttered in 2013).


* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Inquirer''--Note it's an "I," not an "E" like the tabloid. The ''Inky'' to its friends, it's the third-oldest surviving newspaper in the US (founded 1829 as ''The Pennsylvania Inquirer''). It's had a roller-coaster history, cycling between national prominence and local rag status. It's currently in a local-rag phase; its last period of major national prominence was the period from about 1975 to 1995, when it won a number of Pulitzers and broke all kinds of significant national stories (one of the last major ones being a scandal about a charity supposedly providing care packages to soldiers in the UsefulNotes/GulfWar being used to scam donors). The ''Inquirer'' also owns the ''Philadelphia Daily News'', a populist tabloid (explicitly calling itself "The People's Paper" and advertising itself as "Philadelphia's pain in the a[[spoiler:ss]] since 1925") that nevertheless manages to be halfway respectable, and also runs the local-news website Philly.com, which has a surprisingly high profile online.

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* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Inquirer''--Note it's an "I," not an "E" like the tabloid. The ''Inky'' to its friends, it's the third-oldest surviving newspaper in the US (founded 1829 as ''The Pennsylvania Inquirer''). It's had a roller-coaster history, cycling between national prominence and local rag status. It's currently in a local-rag phase; its last period of major national prominence was the period from about 1975 to 1995, when it won a number of Pulitzers and broke all kinds of significant national stories (one of the last major ones being a scandal about a charity supposedly providing care packages to soldiers in the UsefulNotes/GulfWar being used to scam donors). The ''Inquirer'' also owns the ''Philadelphia Daily News'', a populist tabloid (explicitly calling itself "The People's Paper" and advertising itself as "Philadelphia's pain in the a[[spoiler:ss]] since 1925") that nevertheless manages to be halfway respectable, respectable (probably because of its more-or-less common editorial line with the ''Inquirer''; it's also definitely more like the ''New York Daily News'' than the ''New York Post'' in other aspects as well), and also runs the local-news website Philly.com, which has a surprisingly high national profile online.online for a local site.


About the only restriction on publishing material which is in public sources has generally been related to the identities of spies, what is referred to as the "national security" exception. Because a magazine did some research where they combined various public documents and open publications (what would be called "Data Mining" today when done using computers) to discover who they were, and outed the names of a number of undercover U.S. spies (known as "NOC"s or "Non-Official Cover" agents, i.e. illegals not having diplomatic immunity), some of whom were executed by the countries they were spying on, the U.S. Congress passed, the President signed, and the U.S. Supreme Court upheld, a law that makes it illegal to "out" or identify a covert spy, even if you find out from openly published government records. This was why there was such an outcry when that happened in the case of Valerie Plame, a woman who ended up being publicly identified as a CIA employee by columnist Robert Novak, although in this case no charges were ever filed. This rule regarding secret intelligence agents is the one and only exception to the rule that reporters in the U.S. may freely, legally report and publish, without fear of reprisal, anything they find in public records.

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About the only restriction on publishing material which is in public sources has generally been related to the identities of spies, what is referred to as the "national security" exception. Because a magazine did some research where they combined various public documents and open publications (what would be called "Data Mining" "data mining" today when done using computers) to discover who they were, and outed the names of a number of undercover U.S. spies (known as "NOC"s or "Non-Official Cover" agents, i.e. illegals agents whose cover was not having governmental[[note]]Remember, for real spies, "cover" doesn't mean lying about who you are. It means [[CovertGroupWithMundaneFront lying about your job]]. If you're a CIA agent and your name is Dave Wallace, you're from Normal, Illinois, and you love ''Franchise/StarTrek'', you don't need to to lie about that. What you ''do'' need to lie about is that you work for the CIA. Instead, you say you work for some company--maybe it's a front organization, but maybe it's a real U.S. corporation or NGO with business abroad. Either way, the like is easier to maintain. [[/note]] and thus did not grant them diplomatic immunity), some of whom were executed by the countries they were spying on, the U.S. Congress passed, the President signed, and the U.S. Supreme Court upheld, a law that makes it illegal to "out" or identify a covert spy, even if you find out from openly published government records. This was why there was such an outcry when that happened in the case of Valerie Plame, a woman who ended up being publicly identified as a CIA employee by columnist Robert Novak, although in this case no charges were ever filed.filed (basically because Novak (1) was a highly respected conservative pundit, (2) did not realize he was blowing Plame's cover, (3) was almost certainly working as an UnwittingPawn for Dick Cheney, and (4) was possibly going senile--he died six years later of brain cancer). This rule regarding secret intelligence agents is the one and only exception to the rule that reporters in the U.S. may freely, legally report and publish, without fear of reprisal, anything they find in public records.


The meaning of this is still unclear. The death of the newspaper is not the same thing as the death of journalism: There are a ton of online news and opinion resources for the obsessive news consumer. The journalistic model of the American newspaper was always controversial: Right-leaning readers believed that most papers were unquestionably liberal, left-leaning readers thought they were too quiescent to corporate ownership, and the newspapers' emphasis on middle-of-the-road objectivity, [[TropesAreNotBad while commercially effective for years]], was widely criticized by journalism experts and theorists for its over-reliance on "wire service regurgitation", which became regarded as overly bland. In the 1990s, this scheme began to fall out of favor among a more opinionated populace. It didn't help that the censorship code of the industry had been almost unchanged since the 1950s if not earlier, which made newspapers look even more prudish than American TV is known for in other countries.

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The meaning of this is still unclear. The death of the newspaper is not the same thing as the death of journalism: There are a ton of online news and opinion resources for the obsessive news consumer. The journalistic model of the American newspaper was always controversial: Right-leaning readers believed that most papers were unquestionably liberal, left-leaning readers thought they were too quiescent to corporate ownership, and the newspapers' emphasis on middle-of-the-road objectivity, [[TropesAreNotBad while commercially effective for years]], was widely criticized by journalism experts and theorists for its over-reliance on "wire service regurgitation", which became regarded as overly bland. In the 1990s, this scheme began to fall out of favor among a more opinionated populace.populace (the general idea that newspapers "suck up to the establishment" was only reinforced during the 2010s with a growing distrust on traditional media) . It didn't help that the censorship code of the industry had been almost unchanged since the 1950s if not earlier, which made newspapers look even more prudish than American TV is known for in other countries.



The terms "Early Edition" and "Late Edition" came from the previous practice of papers producing an afternoon edition, released in time for factory workers to pick it up on the way home from a 7 a.m.-4 p.m. shift. As technology has shifted, so did the publishing industry, and the last paper to produce an afternoon edition (the ''Buffalo News'') stopped doing so years ago. A variation does survive, however, in the practice in many cities of producing an early Sunday edition of the newspaper on Saturday, mainly to let coupon clippers and bargain hunters get a start on weekend shopping.

to:

The terms "Early Edition" and "Late Edition" came from the previous practice of papers producing an afternoon edition, released in time for factory workers to pick it up on the way home from a 7 a.m.-4 p.m. shift. As technology has shifted, so did the publishing industry, and the last paper to produce an afternoon edition (the ''Buffalo News'') stopped doing so years ago.in 2006. A variation does survive, however, in the practice in many cities of producing an early Sunday edition of the newspaper on Saturday, mainly to let coupon clippers and bargain hunters get a start on weekend shopping.



* ''The Washington Post'' -- Main paper of the Beltway Blowhards. Most famous for exposing Watergate, as seen in the movie ''Film/AllThePresidentsMen''. Both the ''Post'' and the ''New York Times'' were in competition to be the first to report on Watergate as it unfolded, but the ''Post'' first brought it to light and did most of the exposing. One reason was that they had the informer Deep Throat (a top FBI official, the late W. Mark Felt) to help them. Also has good sports coverage: its sportswriters Tony Kornheiser and Michael Wilbon are national celebrities from their daily arguments on ESPN's ''Series/PardonTheInterruption''. From 1961 to 2010, The Washington Post Co. was also notable as the publisher of the nationally-circulated magazine ''Newsweek'', and currently also owns the Kaplan education and test-prep company, a chain of television stations (known as Post-Newsweek Stations until 2014, despite both namesakes being sold off; now it's Graham Media Group), the telecommunications provider Cable ONE (prior to 1997, it was Post-Newsweek Cable), and the online magazine company Slate (which it purchased from Microsoft in 2004). In August 2013, the Post was sold to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos by its long-time owners, the Graham family. With that transaction, The New York Times was left as the only large-scale, family-owned newspaper in the country.

These two papers are widely considered to be the top of the journalistic profession in America, and you can expect any young reporter in fiction to dream of working at either one. In general, the ''Times'' does better in reporting international news, as well as arts and culture, while the ''Post'' is considered to be the go-to for political news. Both are often cited as being proof of the liberal bias of the press. The accuracy of this accusation is debated, and some observers disagree with it. The reporting of both is claimed by some to have a liberal bias, but no one disputes that the editorial and op-ed pages do. On that front the ''Times'' has several columnists, such as Paul Krugman and Maureen Dowd, who do tend to make conservatives' blood pressure rise.[[note]]What's often forgotten is that Dowd also caused ''liberal'' hypertension back in TheNineties thanks to her constant yammering about how UsefulNotes/{{Bill|Clinton}} was cheating on UsefulNotes/{{Hill|aryRodhamClinton}} and how she was too ambitious/weak-willed to do anything about it.[[/note]] On the other hand, they also boast right-of-center writers such as Ross Douthat, and the late William Safire, who in addition to his political column wrote a highly-regarded column on the American English language for the Sunday edition for many years.[[note]]He occasionally dipped into other languages, as well; for instance, he thoroughly chastised the French Academy for adopting "Poutine" as the official French transcription of UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin's name; see EitherWorldDominationOrSomethingAboutBananas for details.[[/note]] Oh, and David Brooks. Both the ''Times'' and the ''Post'' (generally) try to play the role of the centrist voice of reason/Loyal Opposition in their editorial coverage, with the results that they irritate conservatives when a Republican president is in power and annoy liberals when a Democrat holds the White House. The ''NYT'' attracted [[https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/16/us/politics/historians-critique-of-obama-foreign-policy-is-brought-alive-by-events-in-iraq.html international attention in 2014]] when one editorial openly criticized Obama's policies. The ''Post'' did get into a bit of a flap when several bloggers accused columnist Jennifer Rubin of being a Romney campaign mouthpiece in 2012, but this was understood to be an anomaly.

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* ''The Washington Post'' -- Main paper of the Beltway Blowhards. Most famous for exposing Watergate, as seen in the movie ''Film/AllThePresidentsMen''. Both the ''Post'' and the ''New York Times'' were in competition to be the first to report on Watergate as it unfolded, but the ''Post'' first brought it to light and did most of the exposing. One reason was that they had the informer Deep Throat "Deep Throat" (a top FBI official, the late W. Mark Felt) to help them. Also has good sports coverage: its sportswriters Tony Kornheiser and Michael Wilbon are national celebrities from their daily arguments on ESPN's ''Series/PardonTheInterruption''. From 1961 to 2010, The Washington Post Co. was also notable as the publisher of the nationally-circulated magazine ''Newsweek'', and currently also owns the Kaplan education and test-prep company, a chain of television stations (known as Post-Newsweek Stations until 2014, despite both namesakes being sold off; now it's Graham Media Group), the telecommunications provider Cable ONE (prior to 1997, it was Post-Newsweek Cable), and the online magazine company Slate (which it purchased from Microsoft in 2004). In August 2013, the Post was sold to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos by its long-time owners, the Graham family. With that transaction, The New York Times was left as the only large-scale, family-owned newspaper in the country.

These two papers are widely considered to be the top of the journalistic profession in America, and you can expect any young reporter in fiction to dream of working at either one. In general, the ''Times'' does better in reporting international news, as well as arts and culture, while the ''Post'' is considered to be the go-to for political news. Both are often cited as being proof of the liberal bias of the press. The accuracy of this accusation is debated, and some observers disagree with it. The reporting of both is claimed by some to have a liberal (or at the very least, neoconservative) bias, but no one disputes that the editorial and op-ed pages do. On that front the ''Times'' has several columnists, such as Paul Krugman and Maureen Dowd, who do tend to make conservatives' blood pressure rise.[[note]]What's often forgotten is that Dowd also caused ''liberal'' hypertension back in TheNineties thanks to her constant yammering about how UsefulNotes/{{Bill|Clinton}} was cheating on UsefulNotes/{{Hill|aryRodhamClinton}} and how she was too ambitious/weak-willed to do anything about it.[[/note]] On the other hand, they also boast right-of-center writers such as Ross Douthat, and the late William Safire, who in addition to his political column wrote a highly-regarded column on the American English language for the Sunday edition for many years.[[note]]He occasionally dipped into other languages, as well; for instance, he thoroughly chastised the French Academy for adopting "Poutine" as the official French transcription of UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin's name; see EitherWorldDominationOrSomethingAboutBananas for details.[[/note]] Oh, and David Brooks. Both the ''Times'' and the ''Post'' (generally) try to play the role of the centrist voice of reason/Loyal Opposition in their editorial coverage, with the results that they irritate conservatives when a Republican president is in power and annoy liberals when a Democrat holds the White House. The ''NYT'' attracted [[https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/16/us/politics/historians-critique-of-obama-foreign-policy-is-brought-alive-by-events-in-iraq.html international attention in 2014]] when one editorial openly criticized Obama's policies. The ''Post'' did get into a bit of a flap when several bloggers accused columnist Jennifer Rubin of being a Romney campaign mouthpiece in 2012, but this was understood to be an anomaly.



* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last decade or two due to the decline of the industry and bad management. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000. In 2018 was sold to local businessman Patrick Soon-Shiong[[note]]who was actually born in ''South Africa''[[/note]].



* ''Chicago Tribune'' -- Conservative Midwestern broadsheet. Much like the ''LA Times'', once a rather national paper, but the decline of the industry in general and some horrible mismanagement in particular actually sent it and the other Tribune Company papers into bankruptcy for a time. Best known for their famous "Dewey Defeats [[UsefulNotes/HarryTruman Truman]]" headline following the 1948 election, which successfully predicted ahead of time President Thomas E. Dewey's defeat of challenger Harry S. Tru-- [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filehead:Deweytruman12.jpg er, wait]]. Moving on...

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* ''Chicago Tribune'' -- Conservative Midwestern broadsheet. Much like the ''LA Times'', once a rather national paper, but the decline of the industry in general and some horrible mismanagement in particular actually sent it and the other Tribune Company (now tronc) papers into bankruptcy for a time. Best known for their famous "Dewey Defeats [[UsefulNotes/HarryTruman Truman]]" headline following the 1948 election, which successfully predicted ahead of time President Thomas E. Dewey's defeat of challenger Harry S. Tru-- [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filehead:Deweytruman12.jpg er, wait]]. Moving on...



* ''Chicago Sun-Times'' -- Tabloid, more liberal rival to the ''Tribune''. Notable for the late film critic Creator/RogerEbert, and being the newspaper in the show ''Series/EarlyEdition''. It was owned by Murdoch for a time in the 80s (and by an associate afterwards) and later by Conrad Black in the 90s (also leaning more to the right), but this era is considered to be an OldShame.

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* ''Chicago Sun-Times'' -- Tabloid, more liberal rival to the ''Tribune''. Notable for the late film critic Creator/RogerEbert, and being the newspaper in the show ''Series/EarlyEdition''. It was owned by Murdoch for a time in the 80s (and by an associate afterwards) and later by Conrad Black in the 90s (also leaning more to the right), but this era is considered to be an OldShame.OldShame.
* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last fifteen years due to bad management from the Tribune Company. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000. In 2018 was sold to local businessman Patrick Soon-Shiong[[note]]who was actually born in ''South Africa''[[/note]].



* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Baltimore}} Sun'' -- Formerly a paper of national stature, it (like so many other papers) declined heavily over the recent decades. It is most notable for being a major setting of Season 5 of ''Series/TheWire'', as the show's creator was a former reporter there. Also famously the home turf of the writer and cynic H.L. Mencken.
* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Post'' and ''(Denver) Rocky Mountain News'' -- Denver was also a two-paper town. The ''Post'''s sportswriter, Woody Paige, appears on ESPN's ''Around the Horn''. The News was placed for sale by its owner, the E.W. Scripps company, in December 2008. Due to the economic crisis, there were no takers. Publication ceased on February 27, 2009. It was a tearjerker for a good number of people (not only employees of course). (Scripps has returned to Denver, though; they acquired the TV stations formerly owned by [=McGraw-Hill=] in 2012, including the flagship, Denver's 7ABC, KMGH.)

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* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Baltimore}} Sun'' -- Formerly a paper of national stature, it (like so many other papers) declined heavily over since the recent decades.mid-1990s. It is most notable for being a major setting of Season 5 of ''Series/TheWire'', as the show's creator was a former reporter there. Also famously the home turf of the writer and cynic H.L. Mencken.
* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Post'' and ''(Denver) Rocky Mountain News'' -- Denver was also a two-paper town. The ''Post'''s sportswriter, Woody Paige, appears on ESPN's ''Around the Horn''. The News was placed for sale by its owner, the E.W. Scripps company, in December 2008. Due to the economic crisis, there were no takers. Publication ceased on February 27, 2009. It was a tearjerker TearJerker moment for a good number of people (not only employees of course). (Scripps has returned to Denver, though; they acquired the TV stations formerly owned by [=McGraw-Hill=] in 2012, including the flagship, Denver's 7ABC, KMGH.)



* The ''Tampa Bay Times'' is a long-lived paper once called the ''St. Petersberg Times'' and owned by the Poynter Institute journalism school. Since 2012, it's gained national prominence, wide admiration and a truckload of Pulitzer Prizes for a series of longform, investigative pieces about the education system, politics and housing in Florida.
* The ''Hartford Courant'', out of Connecticut, is probably best known nationally for being "the longest continually published newspaper in America", in those ExactWords, having started in 1764 as a weekly before converting to a daily in 1837. Has had some ups and downs over the years, but is generally well regarded in the area.

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* The ''Tampa Bay Times'' is a long-lived long-running paper once called previously known as the ''St. Petersberg Times'' and Petersburg Times'', owned by the Poynter Institute journalism school. Since 2012, its 2012 revamp, it's gained national prominence, wide admiration and a truckload of Pulitzer Prizes for a series of longform, long-form, investigative pieces about the education system, politics and housing in Florida.
* The ''Hartford Courant'', out of Connecticut, is probably best known nationally for being "the longest continually published newspaper in America", in those ExactWords, having started in 1764 as a weekly before converting to a daily in 1837. Has had some ups and downs over the years, but is generally well regarded well-regarded in the area.



* The ''Times-Picayune'' is the newspaper for New Orleans. Most notable in the past few decades for its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2006, but also for the period between 2012 and 2014 when it moved from daily publication to thrice weekly; That resulted in New Orleans becoming the largest city in the United States (and the first major metro area) without a daily newspaper[[note]]If you're wondering what city is now the largest without a daily, that would be Birmingham, Alabama, whose ''Birmingham News'' is a sister paper of the ''Times-Picayune'' that underwent the thrice-weekly publication change at the same time, but hasn't reverted as of 2018.[[/note]], a very unpopular decision that was reversed soon thereafter: an "early Sunday" edition appeared on Saturday evenings while the other days of the week were covered by a tabloid edition. Also, Baton Rouge's ''The Advocate'' extended to NOLA in the meantime, making the "Big Easy" a two-paper town for the first time since 1980.
* ''Website/TheOnion'' -- One of the most famous satirical newspapers in existence. Founded in Madison, Wisconsin, it is now located in Chicago. It also has a non-satirical, but often snarky, entertainment section called ''The AV Club'' which maintains a separate existence despite still being housed in the same paper. Was a national, free, weekly print newspaper - in broadsheet, no less - from 1988 to 2013. At the end of its print run it was only being carried in three cities, down from a peak of 20 a few years earlier. It is currently one the flagship sites for Univision's Gizmodo Media Group.

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* The ''Times-Picayune'' is the newspaper for New Orleans. Most notable in the past few decades for its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2006, but also for the period between 2012 and 2014 when it moved from daily publication to thrice weekly; thrice-weekly; That resulted in New Orleans becoming the largest city in the United States (and the first major metro area) without a daily newspaper[[note]]If you're wondering what city is now the largest without a daily, that would be Birmingham, Alabama, whose ''Birmingham News'' is a sister paper of the ''Times-Picayune'' that underwent the thrice-weekly publication change at the same time, but hasn't reverted as of 2018.[[/note]], a very unpopular decision that was reversed soon thereafter: an "early Sunday" edition appeared on Saturday evenings while the other days of the week were covered by a tabloid edition. Also, Baton Rouge's ''The Advocate'' extended to NOLA in the meantime, making the "Big Easy" a two-paper town for the first time since 1980.
* ''Website/TheOnion'' -- One of the most famous satirical newspapers in existence. Founded in Madison, Wisconsin, it is now located in Chicago. It also has a non-satirical, but often snarky, entertainment section called ''The AV Club'' which maintains a separate existence despite still being housed in the same paper. Was a national, free, weekly print newspaper - in --in broadsheet, no less - less-- from 1988 to 2013. At the end of its print run it was only being carried in three cities, down from a peak of 20 a few years earlier. It is currently one the flagship sites for Univision's Gizmodo Media Group.



* ''The Examiner'' -- Formerly known as the ''San Francisco Examiner'', it gained fame in the late 19th century by being an early example of sensationalism and muckracking that eventually launched the Hearst empire. After becoming an evening paper in 1965 after an agreement with the rival ''Chronicle'', Hearst Corp. sold the paper in 2000 (buying the ''Chron''). The paper was acquired by the Fang family, which turned it into the modern-day freesheet in 2003. It was then sold to the Anschutz family's Clarity Media in 2004, the new owners establishing free dailies in Washington and Baltimore under the ''Examiner'' banner, although the former became a conservative magazine in 2013 and the latter shut down in 2009. The free ''Examiner'' (which was spun off from Clarity Media in 2011) is generally thought as a 'wire service regurgitation' title as you can get. Mostly known on the Internet though for their website which publishes paid stories for many metro areas in the United States. The keyword sadly, being '''paid''', as the "stories" are often poorly written, barely sourced, sometimes plagiarized and in a few cases, even are pushed on forum sites for writers desperate for clicks; on quite a few sites like Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the Examiner site is blacklisted from being used as a reliable source.

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* ''The Examiner'' -- Formerly known as the ''San Francisco Examiner'', it gained fame in the late 19th century by being an early example of sensationalism and muckracking that eventually launched the Hearst empire. After becoming an evening paper in 1965 after an agreement with the rival ''Chronicle'', it lost prominence and Hearst Corp. sold the paper in 2000 (buying the ''Chron'').''Chron'' from the de Young family). The paper was acquired by the Fang family, which turned it into the modern-day freesheet in 2003. It was then sold to the Anschutz family's Clarity Media in 2004, the new owners establishing free dailies in Washington and Baltimore under the ''Examiner'' banner, although the former became a conservative magazine in 2013 and the latter shut down in 2009. The free ''Examiner'' (which was spun off from Clarity Media in 2011) 2011, being sold to administration) is generally thought as a 'wire service regurgitation' title as you can get. Mostly known on the Internet though for their website which publishes paid stories for many metro areas in the United States. The keyword sadly, being '''paid''', as the "stories" are often poorly written, barely sourced, sometimes plagiarized and in a few cases, even are pushed on forum sites for writers desperate for clicks; on quite a few sites like Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the Examiner site is blacklisted from being used as a reliable source.



* ''The National Enquirer'' -- The king of the trashy supermarket tabloids. Brits, think of ''The Sunday Sport'' without (much of) the porn. Its owner from 1954 to 1988 allegedly had Mob ties, and thus refrained from discussing anything pertaining to their activities. Unlike most newspapers, it will pay sources for tips, a practice that is frowned upon by journalists. Generally read for entertainment value, as [[LuridTalesOfDoom little of what is inside can genuinely be classified as news]]; the main reason why it took so long for the mainstream media to catch onto the news of John Edwards' affair was because it was the ''Enquirer'' that broke the story, causing many to dismiss it out of hand (''New York'' Magazine was the only one that followed it up at the time). One of their exposes -- which proved to be false -- also managed to get themselves [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calder_v._Jones enshrined in the legal history of the United States]]. Bizarrely, its publisher's Boca Raton offices were one of the targets of a anthrax attack in 2001, which killed a photo editor.

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* ''The National Enquirer'' -- The king of the trashy supermarket tabloids. Brits, think of ''The Sunday Sport'' without (much of) the porn. Founded as a Sunday evening paper in 1926 by an associate of Hearst, it espoused an arch-conservative editorial line, being quite sympathetic to the KKK and Nazism. And it became the first paper to break the news of the Pearl Harbor attack. Its owner from 1954 1952 to 1988 allegedly had Mob ties, and thus refrained from discussing anything pertaining to their activities. Unlike most newspapers, it will pay sources for tips, a practice that is frowned upon by journalists. Generally read for entertainment value, as [[LuridTalesOfDoom little of what is inside can genuinely be classified as news]]; the main reason why it took so long for the mainstream media to catch onto the news of John Edwards' affair was because it was the ''Enquirer'' that broke the story, causing many to dismiss it out of hand (''New York'' Magazine was the only one that followed it up at the time). One of their exposes -- which proved to be false -- also managed to get themselves [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calder_v._Jones enshrined in the legal history of the United States]]. Bizarrely, its publisher's Boca Raton offices were one of the targets of a anthrax attack in 2001, which killed a photo editor.


* ''The New York Times'' -- Founded in 1851. Daily read of the East Coast intelligentsia, known as the "Old Grey Lady" (although since they've started printing in color it doesn't make sense anymore) and the "Newspaper of Record." Most famous for publishing the "Pentagon Papers," which was a classified government report on how the USA got into and ran the UsefulNotes/VietnamWar. The government tried to stop it from being published, but the courts ruled that the government had to show an extreme danger before the press could be stopped from publishing something. No [[NewspaperComics comics]], but the best crossword in the nation. The ''Times'' also owned the ''Boston Globe'' newspaper and a stake in the Red Sox (with both being sold in 2013). Despite its fame, it's still not recession-proof -- for the first time in history, it now runs ads on the front page. Despite nominally being a New York paper, a national edition of it is easily available in most parts of the country, if only by being the paper sold at most Starbucks (which also gives a hint as to its readership). A rarity in today's market, the ''Times'' is still a basically a family business, with a majority of shares controlled by the Ochs/Sulzberger family since 1896. They also used to own some TV stations in middle-sized markets, like WNEP 16 (ABC) in Scranton, PA; these stations were sold in 2007 to Oak Hill Capital Partners, forming the core of Local TV, LLC; they also acquired many ex New World/Fox-owned stations that Fox sold, like WJW-8 in Cleveland; as of 2014, Local TV has been bought out by the Tribune Company.

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* ''The New York Times'' -- Founded in 1851. Daily read of the East Coast intelligentsia, known as the "Old Grey Lady" (although since they've started printing in color it doesn't make sense anymore) and the "Newspaper of Record." Most famous for publishing the "Pentagon Papers," which was a classified government report on how the USA got into and ran the UsefulNotes/VietnamWar. The government tried to stop it from being published, but the courts ruled that the government had to show an extreme danger before the press could be stopped from publishing something. No [[NewspaperComics comics]], but the best crossword in the nation. The ''Times'' also owned the ''Boston Globe'' newspaper and a stake in the Red Sox (with both being sold in 2013). Despite its fame, it's still not recession-proof -- for the first time in history, it now runs began running ads on the front page.page in 2009. Despite nominally being a New York paper, a national edition of it is easily available in most parts of the country, if only by being the paper sold at most Starbucks (which also gives a hint as to its readership). A rarity in today's market, the ''Times'' is still a basically a family business, with a majority of shares controlled by the Ochs/Sulzberger family since 1896.1896, with Mexican telecom tycoon Carlos Slim being the second-largest share-holder, setting a trend for billionaires to invest in (or downright buy) newspapers. They also used to own some TV stations in middle-sized markets, like WNEP 16 (ABC) in Scranton, PA; these stations were sold in 2007 to Oak Hill Capital Partners, forming the core of Local TV, LLC; they also acquired many ex New World/Fox-owned stations that Fox sold, like WJW-8 in Cleveland; as of 2014, Local TV has been bought out by the Tribune Company.


* ''New York Post'' -- Founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1801, the ''Post'' has gone through a dizzying series of ownership and format changes, and holds the record for the oldest continually-published daily newspaper. While it had previously been known for having a liberal slant, since 1976 it's been owned by right-wing UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch, and is as sleazy and sensationalist as you can get while still technically remaining a newspaper. Brits, think a Noo Yawk-accented version of the ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers Daily Mail]]'', or ''The Sun'' without the {{Page Three stunna}}s (though if the headline is saucy enough, they'll put the tits right into the story). The gossip section that Murdoch created after he took over, known simply as "Page Six" (though it [[ArtifactTitle hasn't been confined to that page]] for a long time), pretty much [[TropeMakers pioneered]] the modern style of celebrity reporting. Arch-rival to the ''Daily News'', a slightly less obscene NYC tabloid. (''Slightly.'') A great deal of overlap in readership with the ''Times'' (especially for their sports coverage), but most ''Times'' readers will not admit this. Mainly read as a sports paper, and for its infamously obnoxious headlines ("Headless Body Found in Topless Bar", which actually inspired the title of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headless_Body_in_Topless_Bar a film]]; "Masturbating Mugger Pulls Another One Off"), to the point where it has even published a book full of their most famous ones, though it's also known for less humorous front page images, such as when they ran a large photo of Music/JohnLennon at the morgue on its December 11, 1980 front page. Known to detractors as the "New York [=comPost=]". The paper is also [[NostalgiaAintLikeItUsedToBe somewhat nostalgic for the days of]] UsefulNotes/RudolphGiuliani, [[TheBigRottenApple and even the days]] ''[[TheBigRottenApple before]]'' (now there's so little crime and so many hipsters that business is quite hard for them). An UrbanLegend claims that Rupert Murdoch once asked the CEO of an upscale department store (usually Bloomingdale's) why his company didn't advertise in the ''Post''. The CEO responded, [[http://articles.latimes.com/2003/jan/12/entertainment/ca-shaw12A "but Rupert, your readers are our shoplifters."]]
* ''New York Daily News'' -- The arch-rival to the ''Post'', founded in 1919. Notorious as the paper of people who ride the New York City Subway (who found the tabloid format easier to handle in the 1920s). Perhaps slightly less tabloid than the ''Post'', as well as a more liberal counterpart (pretty much an American version of the ''Daily Mirror'', though not as left-wing [[note]]They were briefly under common ownership in the early '90s, and until this day some ''Mirror'' and ''NYDN'' staffers swap papers. Also, there was a completely different New York paper that was actually called the ''Daily Mirror'', published from 1924-63.[[/note]]), known for being as slavishly pro-Bloomberg as the ''Post'' is known for its pro-Giuliani stance ([[EnemyMine they both hate Mayor De Blasio]]). It is also noted for its opposition to pro-gun laws and for advocating migrant reform more than any other paper in the country. The paper is also famous for its gigantic, almost full-page headlines, which are usually humorous due to terseness or a pun, and more recently for its provocative and scathing front-page reports on tragedies, atrocities and controversial figures and statements. Despite being a regional paper, the ''Daily News'' has a surprisingly wide publishing range since New Yorkers can be found all over the country (they even had a daily national edition in the 1990s). It was owned by the Tribune company until 1993 (except for a brief period in 1991 when it was owned by Robert Maxwell) when it was sold to property mogul... Mortimer Zuckerman, who in 2017 sold it back to Tribune Publishing for ''one dollar'', although he has continued as publisher.

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* ''New York Post'' -- Founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1801, the ''Post'' has gone through a dizzying series of ownership and format changes, and holds the record for the oldest continually-published daily newspaper. While it had previously been known for having a liberal slant, since 1976 it's been owned by right-wing UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch, and is as sleazy and sensationalist as you can get while still technically remaining a newspaper. Brits, think a Noo Yawk-accented version of the ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers Daily Mail]]'', or ''The Sun'' without the {{Page Three stunna}}s (though if the headline is saucy enough, they'll put the tits right into the story). The gossip section that Murdoch created after he took over, known simply as "Page Six" (though it [[ArtifactTitle hasn't been confined to that page]] for a long time), pretty much [[TropeMakers pioneered]] the modern style of celebrity reporting. Arch-rival to the ''Daily News'', a slightly less obscene NYC tabloid. (''Slightly.'') A great deal of overlap in readership with the ''Times'' (especially for their sports coverage), but most ''Times'' readers will not admit this. Mainly read as a sports paper, and for its infamously obnoxious headlines ("Headless Body Found in Topless Bar", which actually inspired the title of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headless_Body_in_Topless_Bar a film]]; "Masturbating Mugger Pulls Another One Off"), to the point where it has even published a book full of their most famous ones, though it's also known for less humorous front page images, such as when they ran a large photo of Music/JohnLennon at the morgue on its December 11, 1980 front page. Known to detractors as the "New York [=comPost=]". The paper is also [[NostalgiaAintLikeItUsedToBe [[NostalgiaFilter somewhat nostalgic for the days of]] UsefulNotes/RudolphGiuliani, of Rudolph Giuliani]], [[TheBigRottenApple and even the days]] ''[[TheBigRottenApple before]]'' (now there's so little crime and there are so many hipsters that business is quite hard for them). An UrbanLegend claims that Rupert Murdoch once asked the CEO of an upscale department store (usually (apparently Bloomingdale's) why his company didn't advertise in the ''Post''. The CEO responded, [[http://articles.latimes.com/2003/jan/12/entertainment/ca-shaw12A "but Rupert, your readers are our shoplifters."]]
* ''New York Daily News'' -- The arch-rival to the ''Post'', founded in 1919. Notorious as the paper of people who ride the New York City Subway (who found the tabloid format easier to handle in the 1920s). Perhaps slightly less tabloid than the ''Post'', as well as a more liberal counterpart (pretty much an American version of the ''Daily Mirror'', though not as left-wing [[note]]They were briefly under common ownership in the early '90s, and until this day some ''Mirror'' and ''NYDN'' staffers swap papers. Also, there was a completely different New York paper that was actually called the ''Daily Mirror'', published by Hearst from 1924-63.[[/note]]), known for being as slavishly pro-Bloomberg as the ''Post'' is known for its pro-Giuliani stance ([[EnemyMine they both hate Mayor De Blasio]]). It is also noted for its opposition to pro-gun laws and for advocating gun control and migrant reform more than any other paper in the country. The paper is also famous for its gigantic, almost full-page headlines, which are usually humorous due to terseness or a pun, and more recently for its provocative and scathing front-page reports on tragedies, atrocities and controversial figures and statements. Despite being a regional paper, the ''Daily News'' has a surprisingly wide publishing range since New Yorkers can be found all over the country (they even actually had a daily national edition in the 1990s). It was owned by the Tribune company until 1993 (except for a brief period in 1991 when it was owned by Robert Maxwell) when it was sold to property mogul... Mortimer Zuckerman, who in 2017 sold it back to Tribune Publishing for ''one dollar'', although he has continued Zuckerman continues as publisher.



* ''Newsday'' is the newspaper for Long Island and Queens, but can be found in the metropolitan area. Was owned by Times-Mirror, then Tribune, and currently owned by local cable company Cablevision (also owner of the Madison Square Garden and most of its tenants), with their website only available to paper and Cablevision subscribers and those who don't mind paying $40 a month to access it online. Has recently developed a self-important streak: articles on ongoing news stories are often accompanied by thumbnail-sized shots of their own covers illustrating "How ''Newsday'' covered the story". Then again, given how many papers on this list have been suffering in the economy, perhaps the public needs reminding that they publish more than a comics section and movie listings. Ray Barone of ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' was a sports columnist.
* ''The New York Sun'', which was founded in 2002 by Canadian media mogul Conrad Black as an intentionally right-wing five-day daily (much like the Canadian ''National Post'', which he founded in 1997), taking its name from an older paper that went under in 1950 (more known for the ''YesVirginia, There is a SantaClaus'' editorial). Circulation was never high, being unable to compete with the ''Times'' and also being hit by Black's prosecution for embezzlement and tax fraud and the paper operated at a loss to try and build for several years. In a letter to readers published on the front page of the September 4, 2008 edition, it was announced that the paper would "cease publication at the end of September unless we succeed in our efforts to find additional financial backing." They didn't and publication ceased on September 30, but Black still runs a website under that name, largely focusing on political news and conservative commentary.
* ''The New York World-Journal-Tribune'' was not just a paper with a rather unwieldy name, but also a short-lived attempt to keep the city's remaining middle-class newspapers alive, the ''World-Telegram and Sun'', the ''Journal-American''[[note]]Both descendants of the original "yellow papers" of the 1890s, Jospeh Pulitzer's ''World'' and William Randolph Hearst's ''Journal''[[/note]] and the ''Herald-Tribune''[[note]]the most respectable of the three and the originator of the Paris-based ''International Herald Tribune''--currently the international edition of the ''NYT''[[/note]]. It only lasted eight months, between September 1966 and May 1967, with the ''Daily News'' becoming an SpiritualSuccessor of sorts.

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* ''Newsday'' is the newspaper for Long Island and Queens, but can be found in the metropolitan area. Was owned by Times-Mirror, then Tribune, and currently owned by local cable company Cablevision (also owner of the Madison Square Garden and most of its tenants), with their website only available to paper and Cablevision subscribers and those who don't mind paying $40 a month to access it online. Has recently developed a self-important streak: articles on ongoing news stories are often accompanied by thumbnail-sized shots of their own covers illustrating "How ''Newsday'' covered the story". Then again, given how many papers on this list have been suffering in the economy, perhaps the public needs reminding that they publish more than a comics section and movie listings. Ray Barone of ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' was a sports columnist.
columnist for the paper.
* ''The New York Sun'', which was founded in 2002 by Canadian media mogul Conrad Black as an intentionally right-wing five-day daily (much like the Canadian ''National Post'', which he founded in 1997), taking its name from an older paper that went under in 1950 (more known for the ''YesVirginia, There is a SantaClaus'' editorial). Circulation was never high, being unable to compete with the ''Times'' and also being hit by Black's prosecution for embezzlement and tax fraud (which forced him to withdraw within a year) and the paper operated at a loss to try and build for several years. In a letter to readers published on the front page of the September 4, 2008 edition, it was announced that the paper would "cease publication at the end of September unless we succeed in our efforts to find additional financial backing." They didn't and publication ceased on September 30, but Black still runs a website under that name, becoming an online portal largely focusing on political news and conservative commentary.
commentary (including from former owner Conrad Black).
* ''The New York World-Journal-Tribune'' was not just a paper with a rather unwieldy name, but also a short-lived attempt to keep the city's remaining middle-class newspapers alive, the ''World-Telegram and Sun'', the ''Journal-American''[[note]]Both descendants of the original "yellow papers" of the 1890s, Jospeh Joseph Pulitzer's ''World'' and William Randolph Hearst's ''Journal''[[/note]] and the ''Herald-Tribune''[[note]]the most respectable of the three and the originator of the Paris-based ''International Herald Tribune''--currently the international edition of the ''NYT''[[/note]]. It only lasted eight months, between September 1966 and May 1967, with the ''Daily News'' becoming an SpiritualSuccessor of sorts.


* ''The New York World-Journal-Tribune'' was not just a paper with an unwieldy name, but also a short-lived attempt to keep the city's remaining middle-class newspapers alive, the ''World-Telegram'', the ''Journal-American'' [[note]]Both descendants of the original "yellow papers"[[/note]] and the ''Herald-Tribune''[[note]]the most respectable of the three and the owner of the ''International Herald Tribune''--currently the international edition of the ''NYT''[[/note]]. It only lasted eight months, between September 1966 and May 1967.
* The ''Evening Graphic'' only ran for eight years (1924-1932), but it became a symbol of life in the Big Apple during TheRoaringTwenties. Owned by a physical culture advocate, it published [[LuridTalesOfDoom every salacious story possible]], even pasting the faces of public figures over actors enacting "events" they were involved in, its pictures of the Browning divorce case in 1927 becoming its most famous. It also ran the "news" of recently deceased actor Rudolph Valentino being greeted by Enrico Caruso and St. Peter ''at the pearly gates''. It also became the basis for the 1930 play ''Five Star Final, whose 1931 film adaptation being one of Edward G. Robinson's break-out roles.

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* ''The New York World-Journal-Tribune'' was not just a paper with an a rather unwieldy name, but also a short-lived attempt to keep the city's remaining middle-class newspapers alive, the ''World-Telegram'', ''World-Telegram and Sun'', the ''Journal-American'' [[note]]Both ''Journal-American''[[note]]Both descendants of the original "yellow papers"[[/note]] papers" of the 1890s, Jospeh Pulitzer's ''World'' and William Randolph Hearst's ''Journal''[[/note]] and the ''Herald-Tribune''[[note]]the most respectable of the three and the owner originator of the Paris-based ''International Herald Tribune''--currently the international edition of the ''NYT''[[/note]]. It only lasted eight months, between September 1966 and May 1967.
1967, with the ''Daily News'' becoming an SpiritualSuccessor of sorts.
* The ''Evening Graphic'' only ran for eight years (1924-1932), but it became a symbol of life in the Big Apple during TheRoaringTwenties. Owned by Bernarr Macfadden, a physical culture advocate, it published [[LuridTalesOfDoom every salacious story possible]], even pasting the faces of public figures over actors people enacting "events" they were involved in, its pictures of the Browning divorce case in 1927 becoming its most famous. It also ran the "news" of recently deceased actor Rudolph Valentino being greeted by Enrico Caruso and St. Peter ''at the pearly gates''. gates'' (maybe this was something to expect, since Macfadden also published a number of popular, though shamelessly sensationalist pulp magazines, including ''True Story''). It also became the basis for the 1930 play ''Five Star Final, whose Final'' (written by a former employee of the paper), [[Film/FiveStarFinal its 1931 film adaptation adaptation]] being one of Edward G. Robinson's Creator/EdwardGRobinson's [[StarMakingRole break-out roles.roles]].
** The paper's largest claim to fame might be the creation of the gossip column, with Walter Winchell and Ed Sullivan working for the paper.



* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last decade or two due to the decline of the industry and bad management. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000. In 2018 was sold to local businessman Patrick Soon-Shiong[[note]]who was born in ''South Africa''[[/note]].

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* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last decade or two due to the decline of the industry and bad management. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000. In 2018 was sold to local businessman Patrick Soon-Shiong[[note]]who was actually born in ''South Africa''[[/note]].



* The ''Times-Picayune'' is the newspaper for New Orleans. Most notable in the past few decades for its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2006, but also for the period between 2012 and 2014 when it moved from daily publication to thrice weekly; That resulted in New Orleans becoming the largest city in the United States without a daily newspaper, a very unpopular decision that was reversed two years later.[[note]]If you're wondering what city is now the largest without a daily, that would be Birmingham, Alabama, whose ''Birmingham News'' is a sister paper of the ''Times-Picayune'' that underwent the thrice-weekly publication change at the same time, but never reverted back.[[/note]]
* ''Website/TheOnion'' -- One of the most famous satirical newspapers in existence. Founded in Madison, Wisconsin, it is now located in Chicago. It also has a non-satirical, but often snarky, entertainment section called ''The AV Club'' which maintains a separate existence despite still being housed in the same paper. Was a national, free, weekly print newspaper - in broadsheet, no less - from 1988 to 2013. At the end of its print run it was only being carried in three cities, up from a peak of 20. It is currently one the flagship sites for Univision's Gizmodo Media Group.

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* The ''Times-Picayune'' is the newspaper for New Orleans. Most notable in the past few decades for its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2006, but also for the period between 2012 and 2014 when it moved from daily publication to thrice weekly; That resulted in New Orleans becoming the largest city in the United States (and the first major metro area) without a daily newspaper, a very unpopular decision that was reversed two years later.[[note]]If newspaper[[note]]If you're wondering what city is now the largest without a daily, that would be Birmingham, Alabama, whose ''Birmingham News'' is a sister paper of the ''Times-Picayune'' that underwent the thrice-weekly publication change at the same time, but never hasn't reverted back.[[/note]]
as of 2018.[[/note]], a very unpopular decision that was reversed soon thereafter: an "early Sunday" edition appeared on Saturday evenings while the other days of the week were covered by a tabloid edition. Also, Baton Rouge's ''The Advocate'' extended to NOLA in the meantime, making the "Big Easy" a two-paper town for the first time since 1980.
* ''Website/TheOnion'' -- One of the most famous satirical newspapers in existence. Founded in Madison, Wisconsin, it is now located in Chicago. It also has a non-satirical, but often snarky, entertainment section called ''The AV Club'' which maintains a separate existence despite still being housed in the same paper. Was a national, free, weekly print newspaper - in broadsheet, no less - from 1988 to 2013. At the end of its print run it was only being carried in three cities, up down from a peak of 20.20 a few years earlier. It is currently one the flagship sites for Univision's Gizmodo Media Group.



* ''The Examiner'' -- A newspaper which licensed the name of the defunct ''San Francisco Examiner'', which is distributed for free in cities such as San Francisco, Denver, Washington, and Baltimore which is generally about as a 'wire service regurgitation' title as you can get. Mostly known on the Internet though for their website which publishes paid stories for many metro areas in the United States. The keyword sadly, being '''paid''', as the stories are often poorly written, barely sourced, sometimes plagiarized and in a few cases, even are pushed on forum sites for writers desperate for clicks; on quite a few sites like Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the Examiner site is blacklisted from being used as a reliable source.

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* ''The Examiner'' -- A newspaper which licensed Formerly known as the name of the defunct ''San Francisco Examiner'', it gained fame in the late 19th century by being an early example of sensationalism and muckracking that eventually launched the Hearst empire. After becoming an evening paper in 1965 after an agreement with the rival ''Chronicle'', Hearst Corp. sold the paper in 2000 (buying the ''Chron''). The paper was acquired by the Fang family, which is distributed for turned it into the modern-day freesheet in 2003. It was then sold to the Anschutz family's Clarity Media in 2004, the new owners establishing free dailies in cities such as San Francisco, Denver, Washington, Washington and Baltimore which under the ''Examiner'' banner, although the former became a conservative magazine in 2013 and the latter shut down in 2009. The free ''Examiner'' (which was spun off from Clarity Media in 2011) is generally about thought as a 'wire service regurgitation' title as you can get. Mostly known on the Internet though for their website which publishes paid stories for many metro areas in the United States. The keyword sadly, being '''paid''', as the stories "stories" are often poorly written, barely sourced, sometimes plagiarized and in a few cases, even are pushed on forum sites for writers desperate for clicks; on quite a few sites like Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the Examiner site is blacklisted from being used as a reliable source.


* The ''Providence Journal'', the largest paper in Rhode Island (and one of just three dailies in the whole state), is a similarly venerable New England paper that lays claim to being the "oldest ''continuously-published '''daily''''' newspaper" in those ExactWords (the ''Courant'' is older, but wasn't a weekly when it was founded. The ''New York Post'' has been a daily since 1801, but it was forced to stop publishing during two mid-20th century newspaper strikes). The ''[=ProJo=]'' as it is called in the area, is well regarded in Rhode Island despite a series of lay-offs that has greatly reduced the size of its newsroom.

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* The ''Providence Journal'', the largest paper in Rhode Island (and one of just three dailies in the whole state), is a similarly venerable New England paper that lays claim to being the "oldest ''continuously-published '''daily''''' newspaper" in those ExactWords (the ''Courant'' is older, but wasn't a weekly when it was founded. The ''New York Post'' has been a daily since 1801, but it was forced to stop publishing during two mid-20th century newspaper strikes). The ''[=ProJo=]'' as it is called in the area, is well regarded in Rhode Island despite a series of lay-offs that has greatly reduced the size of its newsroom. It's owned by Gatehouse Media, which also owns the second largest daily in the state (''The Newport Daily News'' down south in Newport) and several smaller weeklies and magazines.

Added DiffLines:

* The ''Times-Picayune'' is the newspaper for New Orleans. Most notable in the past few decades for its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2006, but also for the period between 2012 and 2014 when it moved from daily publication to thrice weekly; That resulted in New Orleans becoming the largest city in the United States without a daily newspaper, a very unpopular decision that was reversed two years later.[[note]]If you're wondering what city is now the largest without a daily, that would be Birmingham, Alabama, whose ''Birmingham News'' is a sister paper of the ''Times-Picayune'' that underwent the thrice-weekly publication change at the same time, but never reverted back.[[/note]]


* The ''Tampa Bay Times'' is a long-lived paper once called the ''St. Petersberg Times'' and owned by the Poynter Institute journalism school. Since 2012, it's gained national prominence, wide admiration and truckload of Pulitzer Prizes for a series of longform, investigative pieces about the education system, politics and housing in Florida.

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* The ''Tampa Bay Times'' is a long-lived paper once called the ''St. Petersberg Times'' and owned by the Poynter Institute journalism school. Since 2012, it's gained national prominence, wide admiration and a truckload of Pulitzer Prizes for a series of longform, investigative pieces about the education system, politics and housing in Florida.



* The ''Providence Journal'', the largest paper in Rhode Island (and one of just three dailies in the whole state), is a similarly venerable New England paper that lays claim to being "oldest ''continuously-published '''daily''''' newspaper" in those ExactWords (the ''Courant'' is older, but wasn't a weekly when it was founded. The ''New York Post'' has been a daily since 1801, but it was forced to stop publishing during two mid-20th century newspaper strikes). The ''[=ProJo=]'' as it is called in the area, is well regarded in Rhode Island despite a series of lay-offs that has greatly reduced the size of its newsroom.
* ''Website/TheOnion'' -- One of the most famous satirical newspapers in existence. It also has a non-satirical, but often snarky, entertainment section called ''The AV Club'' which maintains a separate existence despite still being housed in the same paper.

to:

* The ''Providence Journal'', the largest paper in Rhode Island (and one of just three dailies in the whole state), is a similarly venerable New England paper that lays claim to being the "oldest ''continuously-published '''daily''''' newspaper" in those ExactWords (the ''Courant'' is older, but wasn't a weekly when it was founded. The ''New York Post'' has been a daily since 1801, but it was forced to stop publishing during two mid-20th century newspaper strikes). The ''[=ProJo=]'' as it is called in the area, is well regarded in Rhode Island despite a series of lay-offs that has greatly reduced the size of its newsroom.
* ''Website/TheOnion'' -- One of the most famous satirical newspapers in existence. Founded in Madison, Wisconsin, it is now located in Chicago. It also has a non-satirical, but often snarky, entertainment section called ''The AV Club'' which maintains a separate existence despite still being housed in the same paper. Was a national, free, weekly print newspaper - in broadsheet, no less - from 1988 to 2013. At the end of its print run it was only being carried in three cities, up from a peak of 20. It is currently one the flagship sites for Univision's Gizmodo Media Group.


* ''Newsweek'' has traditionally played second fiddle to ''Time'' in terms of both readership and respectability. From 1961 until 2010, it was owned by the Washington Post Company. After losing money for two years, in 2010 it was sold to Sidney Herman, the 90-year-old founder of a speaker company, and then was merged with ''The Daily Beast'', a poor man's ''Huffington Post'' and current pet project of Tina Brown.[[note]]The ''Beast'' is its own unique can of worms, as while the main site is kind of airy, the various particular blogs have drawn some of the best minds in the nation, including two notable disgruntled-with-the-GOP conservatives Andrew Sullivan (who has gotten more moderate since he used to edit ''The New Republic''--see below--whose "Dish" combs through highbrow political and cultural news and analysis; he has since left the Beast) and David Frum.[[/note]] This has led to an increasing amount of pop culture stories (including cover stories) and opinion pieces in its pages. Most recently, it aroused controversy for publishing a {{fanservice}}-y cover photo of SarahPalin in form-fitting workout gear. Like ''Time'', it is a weekly magazine. ''Newsweek'' published its final print edition on December 31, 2012, but continued to be published online until it returned to print under new ownership in 2014.

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* ''Newsweek'' has traditionally played second fiddle to ''Time'' in terms of both readership and respectability. From 1961 until 2010, it was owned by the Washington Post Company. After losing money for two years, in 2010 it was sold to Sidney Herman, the 90-year-old founder of a speaker company, and then was merged with ''The Daily Beast'', a poor man's ''Huffington Post'' and current pet project of Tina Brown.[[note]]The ''Beast'' is its own unique can of worms, as while the main site is kind of airy, the various particular blogs have drawn some of the best minds in the nation, including two notable disgruntled-with-the-GOP conservatives Andrew Sullivan (who has gotten more moderate since he used to edit ''The New Republic''--see below--whose "Dish" combs through highbrow political and cultural news and analysis; he has since left the Beast) and David Frum.[[/note]] This has led to an increasing amount of pop culture stories (including cover stories) and opinion pieces in its pages. Most recently, it aroused controversy for publishing a {{fanservice}}-y cover photo of SarahPalin UsefulNotes/SarahPalin in form-fitting workout gear. Like ''Time'', it is a weekly magazine. ''Newsweek'' published its final print edition on December 31, 2012, but continued to be published online until it returned to print under new ownership in 2014.


* ''USA Today'' -- Famed for its colorful charts and graphs and their sports section's heavy emphasis on college and high school sports polling in association with Creator/{{ESPN}}, otherwise just a bland collection of wire reports, although it's also the only public outlet where the full weekly Nielsen UsefulNotes/{{Ratings}} chart is disseminated in any form. Has the highest circulation of any American newspaper, due to its publisher Gannett owning many local papers around the country (which print digested news sections of ''USA Today'' because of budget cuts which allow Gannett to have their local staffs focus on local news) and adding to its aggressive availability; one technique is to convince hotel chains to deliver one free to each room every day. That adds up to a ''lot'' of newspapers. It is also worth noting that, while it is frequently derided as lightweight journalism (it's sometimes called the "[=McPaper=]"), it has broken a few important stories in recent years.

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* ''USA Today'' -- Famed for its colorful charts and graphs and their sports section's heavy emphasis on college and high school sports polling in association with Creator/{{ESPN}}, otherwise just a bland collection of wire reports, although it's also the only public outlet where the full weekly Nielsen UsefulNotes/{{Ratings}} chart is disseminated in any form. Has the highest circulation of any American newspaper, due to its publisher Gannett owning many local papers around the country (which print digested news sections of ''USA Today'' because of budget cuts which allow Gannett to have their local staffs focus on local news) and adding to its aggressive availability; one technique is to convince hotel chains to deliver one free to each room every day. That adds up to a ''lot'' of newspapers. It is also worth noting that, while it is frequently derided as lightweight journalism (it's sometimes called the "[=McPaper=]"), it has broken a few important stories in recent years. For its first 30 years it rarely editorialized about political issues (which added to its reputation as a "banal" outlet), although beginning in the 2010s it began taking a rather soft liberal slant (nonetheless, its editorials began carrying rebuttals, which have gotten positive attention), condemning the GOP for the 2013 federal shut-down and the 2015 immigration revolt in Congress. In 2016, it "un-endorsed" presidential candidate Donald Trump, a first for the newspaper.



* ''New York Post'' -- Founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1801, the ''Post'' has gone through a dizzying series of ownership and format changes, and holds the record for the oldest continually-published daily newspaper. While it had previously been known for having a liberal slant, since 1976 it's been owned by right-wing UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch, and is as sleazy and sensationalist as you can get while still technically remaining a newspaper. Brits, think a Noo Yawk-accented version of the ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers Daily Mail]]'', or ''The Sun'' without the {{Page Three stunna}}s (though if the headline is saucy enough, they'll put the tits right into the story). The gossip section that Murdoch created after he took over, known simply as "Page Six" (though it [[ArtifactTitle hasn't been confined to that page]] for a long time), pretty much [[TropeMakers pioneered]] the modern style of celebrity reporting. Arch-rival to the ''Daily News'', a slightly less obscene NYC tabloid. (''Slightly.'') A great deal of overlap in readership with the ''Times'' (especially for their sports coverage), but most ''Times'' readers will not admit this. Mainly read as a sports paper, and for its infamously obnoxious headlines ("Headless Body Found in Topless Bar", which actually inspired the title of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headless_Body_in_Topless_Bar a film]]; "Masturbating Mugger Pulls Another One Off"), to the point where it has even published a book full of their most famous ones, though it's also known for less humorous front page images, such as when they ran a large photo of Music/JohnLennon at the morgue on its December 11, 1980 front page. Known to detractors as the "New York [=comPost=]". The paper is also somewhat nostalgic for the days of Rudolph Giuliani, [[TheBigRottenApple and even the days]] ''[[TheBigRottenApple before]]'' (now there's so little crime and so many hipsters that business is quite hard for them). An UrbanLegend claims that Rupert Murdoch once asked the CEO of an upscale department store (usually Bloomingdale's) why his company didn't advertise in the ''Post''. The CEO responded, [[http://articles.latimes.com/2003/jan/12/entertainment/ca-shaw12A "but Rupert, your readers are our shoplifters."]]

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* ''New York Post'' -- Founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1801, the ''Post'' has gone through a dizzying series of ownership and format changes, and holds the record for the oldest continually-published daily newspaper. While it had previously been known for having a liberal slant, since 1976 it's been owned by right-wing UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch, and is as sleazy and sensationalist as you can get while still technically remaining a newspaper. Brits, think a Noo Yawk-accented version of the ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers Daily Mail]]'', or ''The Sun'' without the {{Page Three stunna}}s (though if the headline is saucy enough, they'll put the tits right into the story). The gossip section that Murdoch created after he took over, known simply as "Page Six" (though it [[ArtifactTitle hasn't been confined to that page]] for a long time), pretty much [[TropeMakers pioneered]] the modern style of celebrity reporting. Arch-rival to the ''Daily News'', a slightly less obscene NYC tabloid. (''Slightly.'') A great deal of overlap in readership with the ''Times'' (especially for their sports coverage), but most ''Times'' readers will not admit this. Mainly read as a sports paper, and for its infamously obnoxious headlines ("Headless Body Found in Topless Bar", which actually inspired the title of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headless_Body_in_Topless_Bar a film]]; "Masturbating Mugger Pulls Another One Off"), to the point where it has even published a book full of their most famous ones, though it's also known for less humorous front page images, such as when they ran a large photo of Music/JohnLennon at the morgue on its December 11, 1980 front page. Known to detractors as the "New York [=comPost=]". The paper is also [[NostalgiaAintLikeItUsedToBe somewhat nostalgic for the days of Rudolph Giuliani, of]] UsefulNotes/RudolphGiuliani, [[TheBigRottenApple and even the days]] ''[[TheBigRottenApple before]]'' (now there's so little crime and so many hipsters that business is quite hard for them). An UrbanLegend claims that Rupert Murdoch once asked the CEO of an upscale department store (usually Bloomingdale's) why his company didn't advertise in the ''Post''. The CEO responded, [[http://articles.latimes.com/2003/jan/12/entertainment/ca-shaw12A "but Rupert, your readers are our shoplifters."]]



* ''The New York World-Journal-Tribune'' was not just a paper with an unwieldy name, but also a short-lived attempt to keep the city's remaining middle-class newspapers alive, the ''World-Telegram'', the ''Journal-American'' [[note]]Both descendants of the original "yellow papers"[[/note]] and the ''Herald-Tribune''[[note]]the most respectable of the three[[/note]]. It only lasted eight months, between September 1966 and May 1967.

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* ''The New York World-Journal-Tribune'' was not just a paper with an unwieldy name, but also a short-lived attempt to keep the city's remaining middle-class newspapers alive, the ''World-Telegram'', the ''Journal-American'' [[note]]Both descendants of the original "yellow papers"[[/note]] and the ''Herald-Tribune''[[note]]the most respectable of the three[[/note]].three and the owner of the ''International Herald Tribune''--currently the international edition of the ''NYT''[[/note]]. It only lasted eight months, between September 1966 and May 1967.



* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last decade or two due to the decline of the industry and bad management. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000.

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* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last decade or two due to the decline of the industry and bad management. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000. In 2018 was sold to local businessman Patrick Soon-Shiong[[note]]who was born in ''South Africa''[[/note]].


* ''National Review'': A conservative biweekly magazine founded by William F. Buckley. It played a major role in shaping much of the policy of the "New Right" coalition that would eventually bring UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan into power, while simultaneously helping to purge American conservatism of its more odious elements (the anti-Semites, the Birchers and, starting in the '70s, the segregationists). It remains one of the most influential conservative news outlets around.

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* ''National Review'': A conservative biweekly magazine founded by William F. Buckley. It played a major role in shaping much of the policy of the "New Right" coalition that would eventually bring UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan into power, while simultaneously helping to purge American conservatism of its more odious elements (the anti-Semites, the Birchers and, starting in the '70s, the segregationists). It remains one of the most influential conservative news outlets around.around, though some of its editorial stances notably against police brutality and in favor of Black Lives Matter sets it apart from its kin.


* ''New York Daily News'' -- The arch-rival to the ''Post'', founded in 1919. Notorious as the paper of people who ride the New York City Subway (who found the tabloid format easier to handle in the 1920s). Perhaps slightly less tabloid than the ''Post'', as well as a more liberal counterpart (pretty much an American version of the ''Daily Mirror'', though not as left-wing [[note]]They were briefly under common ownership in the early '90s, and until this day some ''Mirror'' and ''NYDN'' staffers swap papers. Also, there was a completely different New York paper that was actually called the ''Daily Mirror'', published from 1924-63.[[/note]]), known for being as slavishly pro-Bloomberg as the ''Post'' is known for its pro-Giuliani stance ([[EnemyMine they both hate Mayor De Blasio]]). It is also noted for its opposition to pro-gun laws and for advocating migrant reform more than any other paper in the country. The paper is also famous for its gigantic, almost full-page headlines, which are usually humorous due to terseness or a pun, and its provocative and scathing front-page reports on tragedies, atrocities and controversial figures and statements. Despite being a regional paper, the ''Daily News'' has a surprisingly wide publishing range since New Yorkers can be found all over the country (they even had a daily national edition in the 1990s).

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* ''New York Daily News'' -- The arch-rival to the ''Post'', founded in 1919. Notorious as the paper of people who ride the New York City Subway (who found the tabloid format easier to handle in the 1920s). Perhaps slightly less tabloid than the ''Post'', as well as a more liberal counterpart (pretty much an American version of the ''Daily Mirror'', though not as left-wing [[note]]They were briefly under common ownership in the early '90s, and until this day some ''Mirror'' and ''NYDN'' staffers swap papers. Also, there was a completely different New York paper that was actually called the ''Daily Mirror'', published from 1924-63.[[/note]]), known for being as slavishly pro-Bloomberg as the ''Post'' is known for its pro-Giuliani stance ([[EnemyMine they both hate Mayor De Blasio]]). It is also noted for its opposition to pro-gun laws and for advocating migrant reform more than any other paper in the country. The paper is also famous for its gigantic, almost full-page headlines, which are usually humorous due to terseness or a pun, and more recently for its provocative and scathing front-page reports on tragedies, atrocities and controversial figures and statements. Despite being a regional paper, the ''Daily News'' has a surprisingly wide publishing range since New Yorkers can be found all over the country (they even had a daily national edition in the 1990s).
1990s). It was owned by the Tribune company until 1993 (except for a brief period in 1991 when it was owned by Robert Maxwell) when it was sold to property mogul... Mortimer Zuckerman, who in 2017 sold it back to Tribune Publishing for ''one dollar'', although he has continued as publisher.



* ''Newsday'' is the newspaper for Long Island and Queens, but can be found in the metropolitan area. Was owned by Times Mirror, then Tribune, and currently owned by local cable company Cablevision (also owner of the Madison Square Garden and most of its tenants), with their website only available to paper and Cablevision subscribers and those who don't mind paying $40 a month to access it online. Has recently developed a self-important streak: articles on ongoing news stories are often accompanied by thumbnail-sized shots of their own covers illustrating "How ''Newsday'' covered the story". Then again, given how many papers on this list have been suffering in the economy, perhaps the public needs reminding that they publish more than a comics section and movie listings. Ray Barone of ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' was a sports columnist.
* ''The New York Sun'', which was founded in 2002 as an intentionally right-wing five-day daily, taking its name from an older paper that went under in 1950 (more known for the ''YesVirginia, There is a SantaClaus'' editorial). Circulation was never high and the paper operated at a loss to try and build for several years. In a letter to readers published on the front page of the September 4, 2008 edition, it was announced that the paper would "cease publication at the end of September unless we succeed in our efforts to find additional financial backing." They didn't. Publication ceased on September 30.

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* ''Newsday'' is the newspaper for Long Island and Queens, but can be found in the metropolitan area. Was owned by Times Mirror, Times-Mirror, then Tribune, and currently owned by local cable company Cablevision (also owner of the Madison Square Garden and most of its tenants), with their website only available to paper and Cablevision subscribers and those who don't mind paying $40 a month to access it online. Has recently developed a self-important streak: articles on ongoing news stories are often accompanied by thumbnail-sized shots of their own covers illustrating "How ''Newsday'' covered the story". Then again, given how many papers on this list have been suffering in the economy, perhaps the public needs reminding that they publish more than a comics section and movie listings. Ray Barone of ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' was a sports columnist.
* ''The New York Sun'', which was founded in 2002 by Canadian media mogul Conrad Black as an intentionally right-wing five-day daily, daily (much like the Canadian ''National Post'', which he founded in 1997), taking its name from an older paper that went under in 1950 (more known for the ''YesVirginia, There is a SantaClaus'' editorial). Circulation was never high high, being unable to compete with the ''Times'' and also being hit by Black's prosecution for embezzlement and tax fraud and the paper operated at a loss to try and build for several years. In a letter to readers published on the front page of the September 4, 2008 edition, it was announced that the paper would "cease publication at the end of September unless we succeed in our efforts to find additional financial backing." They didn't. Publication didn't and publication ceased on September 30.30, but Black still runs a website under that name, largely focusing on political news and conservative commentary.
* ''The New York World-Journal-Tribune'' was not just a paper with an unwieldy name, but also a short-lived attempt to keep the city's remaining middle-class newspapers alive, the ''World-Telegram'', the ''Journal-American'' [[note]]Both descendants of the original "yellow papers"[[/note]] and the ''Herald-Tribune''[[note]]the most respectable of the three[[/note]]. It only lasted eight months, between September 1966 and May 1967.
* The ''Evening Graphic'' only ran for eight years (1924-1932), but it became a symbol of life in the Big Apple during TheRoaringTwenties. Owned by a physical culture advocate, it published [[LuridTalesOfDoom every salacious story possible]], even pasting the faces of public figures over actors enacting "events" they were involved in, its pictures of the Browning divorce case in 1927 becoming its most famous. It also ran the "news" of recently deceased actor Rudolph Valentino being greeted by Enrico Caruso and St. Peter ''at the pearly gates''. It also became the basis for the 1930 play ''Five Star Final, whose 1931 film adaptation being one of Edward G. Robinson's break-out roles.



* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last decade or two due to the decline of the industry and bad management. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times Mirror before Tribune bought it in 2000.

to:

* ''Los Angeles Times'' -- Biggest paper on the West Coast, owned by the Tribune Company (named for the aforementioned ''Chicago Tribune''). Was once something of a nationally-renowned (albeit not necessarily nationally read) paper, but has taken a bad turn over the last decade or two due to the decline of the industry and bad management. Still noted for decent coverage of Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its star reporter Matt Pearce has a massive following on Twitter due to his professional-but-casual style of reporting. Previously owned by Times Mirror Times-Mirror[[note]]The ''Mirror'' was the ''Times''' evening edition which closed down in 1962[[/note]] before Tribune bought it in 2000.



* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Inquirer''--Note it's an "I," not an "E" like the tabloid. The ''Inky'' to its friends, it's the third-oldest surviving newspaper in the US (founded 1829 as ''The Pennsylvania Inquirer''). It's had a roller-coaster history, cycling between national prominence and local rag status. It's currently in a local-rag phase; its last period of major national prominence was the period from about 1975 to 1995, when it won a number of Pulitzers and broke all kinds of significant national stories (one of the last major ones being a scandal about a charity supposedly providing care packages to soldiers in the UsefulNotes/GulfWar being used to scam donors). The ''Inquirer'' also owns the ''Philadelphia Daily News'', a populist tabloid (explicitly calling itself "The People's Paper" and advertising itself as "Philadelphia's pain in the ass since 1925") that nevertheless manages to be halfway respectable, and also runs the local-news website Philly.com, which has a surprisingly high profile online.

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* ''The UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Inquirer''--Note it's an "I," not an "E" like the tabloid. The ''Inky'' to its friends, it's the third-oldest surviving newspaper in the US (founded 1829 as ''The Pennsylvania Inquirer''). It's had a roller-coaster history, cycling between national prominence and local rag status. It's currently in a local-rag phase; its last period of major national prominence was the period from about 1975 to 1995, when it won a number of Pulitzers and broke all kinds of significant national stories (one of the last major ones being a scandal about a charity supposedly providing care packages to soldiers in the UsefulNotes/GulfWar being used to scam donors). The ''Inquirer'' also owns the ''Philadelphia Daily News'', a populist tabloid (explicitly calling itself "The People's Paper" and advertising itself as "Philadelphia's pain in the ass a[[spoiler:ss]] since 1925") that nevertheless manages to be halfway respectable, and also runs the local-news website Philly.com, which has a surprisingly high profile online.



* ''The Boston Globe'' -- The paper of record for the entirety of New England. It is currently owned by John Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox. Well known for its Spotlight investigative journalism team, whose Pultizer Prize-winning work investigating the sex abuse scandal in the city's Catholic churches was turned into an [[Film/{{Spotlight}} Oscar-winning film]]. Has its own online AlternativeRock radio station, [=RadioBDC=], a spiritual successor to the city's defunct but storied rock station WFNX. Boston is also one of the last remaining two newspaper cities; The ''Globe'' shares Beantown with the older but less read ''Boston Herald'' (It used to be considered a ''three'' paper town, with the alt-weekly ''Boston Phoenix'' being equally highly regarded, but it was shuttered in 2013).

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* ''The Boston Globe'' -- The paper of record for the entirety of New England. It is currently owned by John Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox. Well known for its Spotlight investigative journalism team, whose Pultizer Prize-winning work investigating the sex abuse scandal in the city's Catholic churches was turned into an [[Film/{{Spotlight}} Oscar-winning film]]. Has its own online AlternativeRock radio station, [=RadioBDC=], a spiritual successor to the city's defunct but storied rock station WFNX. Boston is also one of the last remaining two newspaper cities; The ''Globe'' shares Beantown with the older but less read less-read tabloid ''Boston Herald'' (It used to be considered a ''three'' paper town, with the alt-weekly ''Boston Phoenix'' being equally highly regarded, but it was shuttered in 2013).



* The ''Providence Journal'', the largest paper in Rhode Island (and one of just three dailies in the whole state), is a similarly venerable New England paper that lays claim to being "oldest continuously-published daily newspaper" in those ExactWords (the ''Courant'' is older, but wasn't a weekly when it was founded. The ''New York Post'' has been a daily since 1801, but it was forced to stop publishing during two mid-20th century newspaper strikes). The ''[=ProJo=]'' as it is called in the area, is well regarded in Rhode Island despite a series of lay-offs that has greatly reduced the size of its newsroom.

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* The ''Providence Journal'', the largest paper in Rhode Island (and one of just three dailies in the whole state), is a similarly venerable New England paper that lays claim to being "oldest continuously-published daily ''continuously-published '''daily''''' newspaper" in those ExactWords (the ''Courant'' is older, but wasn't a weekly when it was founded. The ''New York Post'' has been a daily since 1801, but it was forced to stop publishing during two mid-20th century newspaper strikes). The ''[=ProJo=]'' as it is called in the area, is well regarded in Rhode Island despite a series of lay-offs that has greatly reduced the size of its newsroom.

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