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* ''WesternAnimation/GlitchTechs'': On January 9, 2019, the crew for the show walked into work only to discover that [[https://www.cartoonbrew.com/business/nickelodeon-froze-production-laid-off-significant-crew-on-its-upcoming-series-glitch-techs-169049.html production had been "frozen" on the series]] in the middle of producing a ten-episode second season, and that anyone not required for post-production on the original 20-episode season one order was being immediately laid off.

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* ''WesternAnimation/GlitchTechs'': On A videogame-themed action-comedy announced in 2018 for Nickelodeon and set to premierer in mid-to-late 2019. However, on January 9, 2019, the crew for the show walked into work only to discover that [[https://www.cartoonbrew.com/business/nickelodeon-froze-production-laid-off-significant-crew-on-its-upcoming-series-glitch-techs-169049.html production had been "frozen" on the series]] in the middle of producing a ten-episode second season, and that anyone not required for post-production on the original 20-episode season one order was being immediately laid off. The series eventually premiered on Netflix in February 2020 as part of a deal between Viacom and Netflix.


* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' has had this happen a few times, as a consequence of its famously fast production process:
** Much of Season 2, plus the first few episodes of Season 3, suffered from creators Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone being busy firstly working on ''Film/{{Baseketball}}'', and then ''WesternAnimation/SouthParkBiggerLongerAndUncut''. This is evident in that Season 2 in particular is reliant on {{Whole Plot Reference}}s and {{Random Events Plot}}s to an even greater extent than Season 1, despite Parker and Stone having disliked how often they had to fall back on said plots in that season.
** "A Million Little Fibers" stands out in that the episode ended up being almost totally scrapped and rewritten midway through production. Initially the plot revolved around the townspeople helping Towelie get over his drug habit, but Parker decided it wasn't working and scrapped everything (the opening scene with Towelie losing his job working at P.F. Chang's is the only footage to survive from the original version), and instead went with a storyline satirizing the then-recent controversy over ''Literature/AMillionLittlePieces'' turning out to be mostly fictional despite being promoted as autobiographical. Production of the final version was so rushed that much of the finished product noticeably consists of just static artwork while characters talk in voiceover.
** Whereas UsefulNotes/BarackObama's two elections were considered safe enough that the show was able to reference the results in the next episode without any trouble,[[note]](For Obama's first election in 2008 it was obvious to most people by the week of election that rival candidate John [=McCain=] didn't have a prayer of winning, and while 2012 rival Mitt Romney's chances were considered better enough that they did at least storyboard an alternate ending in case he won, by election week they were confident enough in an Obama victory that they never bothered animating it)[[/note]] Season 20's intended story arc was derailed by UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump unexpectedly defeating UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton. Ironically, the episode scheduled for the following day was the one ''least'' affected, since Parker and Stone had at least taken the possibility of a Trump victory seriously enough that the episode was written in such a way that it could be quickly retooled in just such an event. However, since the remaining episodes of the season were written under the assumption of a Clinton victory, they had to be largely scrapped and rewritten from scratch.



* ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' had several episodes (specifically, Season 1 episodes "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E38StrangeTalesOfWeirdScience Strange Tales of Weird Science]]", "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E42LooniversityDaze Lonniversity Daze]]", and "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E44HeroHamton Hero Hamton]]") outsourced to a domestic animation studio based in Nevada called Creator/EncoreCartoons. However, Encore turned in results that were ''far'' below the standards the crew was looking for. When the crew sent for retakes, they ended up with results that were just as bad if not worse. The crew eventually ran out of time to get better animation (by which point the episodes, meant to be the third, sixth, and tenth episodes of the season respectively, had ended up being pushed back to the middle of the season) and had no choice but to either use the best Encore takes in the final episodes or have other studios such as Creator/KennedyCartoons or [[Creator/JonMcClenahan Startoons]] replace some of the worst animation. Even with the best takes, these three episodes still ended up with some of the worst animation and OffModel moments of the entire series. The episodes' troubled production was lampshaded numerously in "Strange Tales" (via self-deprecating dialogue that was added in during its production and the obligatory CreditsGag: "Number of Retakes: Don't Ask"), which also notably had AlanSmithee credits for two of the included shorts. Needless to say, the crew never worked with Encore again after the disastrous production of these three episodes. The aforementioned Kennedy Cartoons itself had very inconsistent animation quality (going from fluid and energetic animation to horrendously sloppy OffModel animation and character designs at the drop of a hat) that resulted in a few episodes being held up in production as well[[labelnote:notably...]]"[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E18HareTodayGoneTomorrow Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow]], which was the first episode in production order (but became the 18th episode) and also threw shade at itself in its CreditsGag ("Moral of the Story: We Need More Animators") and "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E65HighToon High Toon]]", which ended up being held up until more than a month after the intended season finale "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E64KACMETV K-ACME TV]]"[[/labelnote]]. Like Encore, Kennedy Cartoons was shown the door after the season's end.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' The first season of ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'', while still acclaimed overall, had several episodes (specifically, Season 1 episodes a hectic production schedule that was hampered by animation studios turning in less than stellar results:
** Several early-run episodes, specifically
"[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E38StrangeTalesOfWeirdScience Strange Tales of Weird Science]]", "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E42LooniversityDaze Lonniversity Daze]]", and "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E44HeroHamton Hero Hamton]]") Hamton]]", were outsourced to a domestic animation studio based in Nevada called Creator/EncoreCartoons. However, Encore turned in results that were ''far'' below the standards the crew was looking for. for, with sloppy character designs, continuity errors (one of the most infamous ones was one in "Looniversity Daze" wherein Plucky was inserted into a classroom scene when he was supposed to be sitting just outside the classroom, resulting in the duplicate Plucky being colored purple with a blue tank top instead of green with a white tank top in the final product to hide this as the production crew was out of time), and extremely LimitedAnimation out the wazoo ("Strange Tales" features points where the characters' mouths barely even move as they speak). When the crew sent for retakes, they ended up with results that were just as bad if not even worse. The crew eventually ran out of time to get better animation (by which point the episodes, meant to be the third, sixth, and tenth episodes of the season respectively, had ended up being pushed back to the middle of the season) and had no choice but to either use the best Encore takes in the final episodes or have other studios such as Creator/KennedyCartoons or [[Creator/JonMcClenahan Startoons]] replace some of the worst animation. Even with the best takes, these three episodes still ended up with some of the worst animation and OffModel moments of the entire series. The episodes' troubled production was lampshaded numerously in "Strange Tales" (via self-deprecating dialogue that was added in during its production and the obligatory CreditsGag: "Number of Retakes: Don't Ask"), which also notably had AlanSmithee credits for two of the included shorts. Needless to say, the crew never worked with Encore again after the disastrous production of these three episodes.
**
The aforementioned Kennedy Cartoons itself had very inconsistent animation quality (going from fluid and energetic animation to horrendously sloppy OffModel animation and character designs at the drop of a hat) and the company didn't always concern themselves with emulating the classic ''Looney Tunes'' style that Steven Spielberg (whom company founder Glen Kennedy reportedly argued with over the vision for the series' animation) and the show's crew were aiming for, instead emulating the type of animation they used in shows such as ''WesternAnimation/APupNamedScoobyDoo''. The inconsistent animation and squabbles between Steven and Glen resulted in a few episodes being held up in production as well[[labelnote:notably...production[[labelnote:notably...]]"[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E18HareTodayGoneTomorrow Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow]], which was the first episode in production order (but became the 18th episode) and also threw shade at itself in its CreditsGag ("Moral of the Story: We Need More Animators") and "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E65HighToon High Toon]]", which ended up being held up until more than a month after the intended season finale "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E64KACMETV K-ACME TV]]"[[/labelnote]]. Like TV]]"[[/labelnote]] and/or having the worse animation being filled in by Jon [=McClenahan=][='s=] crew, much like with Encore, and, also like Encore, Kennedy Cartoons was shown the door after at the season's end.



** Eventually, Phil Roman and Don Oriolo found the "Cartoonist Driven" approach of the first season to be too taxing on them, and not even worth the trouble since, despite being one of the most expensive shows that Phil Roman's studio had made, the first season turned out to be a flop in ratings, due in part to a terrible time slot--it was sandwiched right between sports shows and then-ratings giant WesternAnimation/XMen, making it very hard to establish an audience for the show. On top of that, Don was just unhappy with the weird direction of season 1 having almost nothing in common with Joe Oriolo's Felix, so the second season went through an extensive {{retool}}--while the first season was storyboarded while working from a basic outline, and was absurdly surreal in its premises and animation, the second season decided to take the series into a direction more in vogue with the Joe Oriolo Felix cartoons and shift production to make the show a more standard TV cartoon, with scripts replacing the all-storyboard approach (usually provided by the writer of ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'', Creator/MarkEvanier, [[OldShame who has remained silent on the series ever since]]), resulting in much more linear plotting and less surreal humor and more emphasis on wordplay and one liners, as well as bringing back some of the Oriolo era characters like Poindexter, Master Cylinder and The Professor while forcing most of the new side characters to be scrapped in turn. This move was met with outright hostile reception from the shows staff, particularly the producer of the first season, who knew Don's meddling would only make things worse and [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the show]] just ''two weeks'' into the second seasons production. They even tried to have the writers voice direct the actors instead of the directors, but after a couple weeks of trying that, the results were so disastrous that the studio was forced to drop that and hand over voice direction back to the cartoon directors. The staff retaliated by [[WriterRevolt writing whole episodes that took jabs at the second seasons toned down retool]], such as "Attack of the Robot Rat" (which infuriated Don Oriolo for being a [[TakeThat ruthless parody]] of his dads made for TV Felix the Cat cartoons), "Phoney Felix" and "The Fuzzy Bunny Show". The first few scripts they received were followed closely, but the shows new producer finally fought for the artists to have more storytelling and creative control on the show, and they were able to completely scrap the scripts and write their own shows, ironically giving the crew ''more'' freedom than they had in the first season. Some episodes were tightly scripted and some were not. Unfortunately for them, the VP of Children's Programming, Judy Price, who wanted the show picked up in the first place, got fired, and Felix the Cat Inc. was so unhappy with the show in general that they refused to renew the license for Phil Roman to continue using Felix, guaranteeing a third season wouldn't happen. To make matters worse, the second season turned to be an [[GoneHorriblyWrong even]] ''[[GoneHorriblyWrong bigger]]'' [[GoneHorriblyWrong flop in the ratings]], and it ultimately got the show canned, with season 2 [[CutShort ending after just 8 episodes.]] The second season was considered a disaster in the eyes of everyone involved in it (especially Don Oriolo, who is barely willing to acknowledge the existence of ''Twisted Tales'' these days) and the show's failure ultimately put the Felix the Cat cartoons on ice yet ''again'' (having already gone through it with [[WesternAnimation/FelixTheCatTheMovie the 1991 movie]], which was a box office bomb), with only low key revivals coming of the series after the fact.

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** Eventually, Phil Roman and Don Oriolo found the "Cartoonist Driven" approach of the first season to be too taxing on them, and not even worth the trouble since, despite being one of the most expensive shows that Phil Roman's studio had made, the first season turned out to be a flop in ratings, due in part to a terrible time slot--it was sandwiched right between sports shows and then-ratings giant WesternAnimation/XMen, making it very hard to establish an audience for the show. On top of that, Don was just unhappy with the weird direction of season 1 having almost nothing in common with Joe Oriolo's Felix, so the second season went through an extensive {{retool}}--while the first season was storyboarded while working from a basic outline, and was absurdly surreal in its premises and animation, the second season decided to take the series into a direction more in vogue with the Joe Oriolo Felix cartoons and shift production to make the show a more standard TV cartoon, with scripts replacing the all-storyboard approach (usually provided by the writer of ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'', Creator/MarkEvanier, [[OldShame who has remained silent on the series ever since]]), resulting in much more linear plotting and less surreal humor and more emphasis on wordplay and one liners, as well as bringing back some of the Oriolo era characters like Poindexter, Master Cylinder and The Professor while forcing most of the new side characters to be scrapped in turn. This move was met with outright hostile reception from the shows staff, particularly the producer of the first season, who knew Don's meddling would only make things worse and [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the show]] just ''two weeks'' into the second seasons production. They even tried to have the writers voice direct the actors instead of the directors, but after a couple weeks of trying that, the results were so disastrous that the studio was forced to drop that and hand over voice direction back to the cartoon directors. The staff retaliated by [[WriterRevolt writing whole episodes that took jabs at the second seasons toned down retool]], such as "Attack of the Robot Rat" (which infuriated Don Oriolo for being a [[TakeThat ruthless parody]] of his dads made for TV Felix the Cat cartoons), "Phoney Felix" and "The Fuzzy Bunny Show". The first few scripts they received were followed closely, but the shows new producer finally fought for the artists to have more storytelling and creative control on the show, and they were able to completely scrap the scripts and write their own shows, ironically giving the crew ''more'' freedom than they had in the first season. Some episodes were tightly scripted and some were not. Unfortunately for them, the VP of Children's Programming, Judy Price, who wanted the show picked up in the first place, got fired, and Felix the Cat Inc. was so unhappy with the show in general that they refused to renew the license for Phil Roman to continue using Felix, guaranteeing a third season wouldn't happen. To make matters worse, the second season turned to be an [[GoneHorriblyWrong even]] ''[[GoneHorriblyWrong bigger]]'' [[GoneHorriblyWrong flop in the ratings]], and it ultimately got the show canned, with season 2 [[CutShort ending after just 8 episodes.]] The second season was considered a disaster in the eyes of everyone involved in it (especially Don Oriolo, who is barely willing to acknowledge the existence of ''Twisted Tales'' these days) and the show's failure ultimately put the Felix the Cat cartoons on ice yet ''again'' (having already gone through it with [[WesternAnimation/FelixTheCatTheMovie the 1991 movie]], which was a box office bomb), with only low key revivals coming of the series after the fact.fact and the character's 100th birthday in 2019 passing by with little to no fanfare.



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' has had this happen a few times, as a consequence of its famously fast production process:
** Much of Season 2, plus the first few episodes of Season 3, suffered from creators Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone being busy firstly working on ''Film/{{Baseketball}}'', and then ''WesternAnimation/SouthParkBiggerLongerAndUncut''. This is evident in that Season 2 in particular is reliant on {{Whole Plot Reference}}s and {{Random Events Plot}}s to an even greater extent than Season 1, despite Parker and Stone having disliked how often they had to fall back on said plots in that season.
** "A Million Little Fibers" stands out in that the episode ended up being almost totally scrapped and rewritten midway through production. Initially the plot revolved around the townspeople helping Towelie get over his drug habit, but Parker decided it wasn't working and scrapped everything (the opening scene with Towelie losing his job working at P.F. Chang's is the only footage to survive from the original version), and instead went with a storyline satirizing the then-recent controversy over ''Literature/AMillionLittlePieces'' turning out to be mostly fictional despite being promoted as autobiographical. Production of the final version was so rushed that much of the finished product noticeably consists of just static artwork while characters talk in voiceover.
** Whereas UsefulNotes/BarackObama's two elections were considered safe enough that the show was able to reference the results in the next episode without any trouble,[[note]](For Obama's first election in 2008 it was obvious to most people by the week of election that rival candidate John [=McCain=] didn't have a prayer of winning, and while 2012 rival Mitt Romney's chances were considered better enough that they did at least storyboard an alternate ending in case he won, by election week they were confident enough in an Obama victory that they never bothered animating it)[[/note]] Season 20's intended story arc was derailed by UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump unexpectedly defeating UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton. Ironically, the episode scheduled for the following day was the one ''least'' affected, since Parker and Stone had at least taken the possibility of a Trump victory seriously enough that the episode was written in such a way that it could be quickly retooled in just such an event. However, since the remaining episodes of the season were written under the assumption of a Clinton victory, they had to be largely scrapped and rewritten from scratch.

Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' has had this happen a few times, as a consequence of its famously fast production process:
** Much of Season 2, plus the first few episodes of Season 3, suffered from creators Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone being busy firstly working on ''Film/{{Baseketball}}'', and then ''WesternAnimation/SouthParkBiggerLongerAndUncut''. This is evident in that Season 2 in particular is reliant on {{Whole Plot Reference}}s and {{Random Events Plot}}s to an even greater extent than Season 1, despite Parker and Stone having disliked how often they had to fall back on said plots in that season.
** "A Million Little Fibers" stands out in that the episode ended up being almost totally scrapped and rewritten midway through production. Initially the plot revolved around the townspeople helping Towelie get over his drug habit, but Parker decided it wasn't working and scrapped everything (the opening scene with Towelie losing his job working at P.F. Chang's is the only footage to survive from the original version), and instead went with a storyline satirizing the then-recent controversy over ''Literature/AMillionLittlePieces'' turning out to be mostly fictional despite being promoted as autobiographical. Production of the final version was so rushed that much of the finished product noticeably consists of just static artwork while characters talk in voiceover.
** Whereas UsefulNotes/BarackObama's two elections were considered safe enough that the show was able to reference the results in the next episode without any trouble,[[note]](For Obama's first election in 2008 it was obvious to most people by the week of election that rival candidate John [=McCain=] didn't have a prayer of winning, and while 2012 rival Mitt Romney's chances were considered better enough that they did at least storyboard an alternate ending in case he won, by election week they were confident enough in an Obama victory that they never bothered animating it)[[/note]] Season 20's intended story arc was derailed by UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump unexpectedly defeating UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton. Ironically, the episode scheduled for the following day was the one ''least'' affected, since Parker and Stone had at least taken the possibility of a Trump victory seriously enough that the episode was written in such a way that it could be quickly retooled in just such an event. However, since the remaining episodes of the season were written under the assumption of a Clinton victory, they had to be largely scrapped and rewritten from scratch.


* ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' had several episodes (specifically, Season 1 episodes "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E38StrangeTalesOfWeirdScience Strange Tales of Weird Science]]", "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E42LooniversityDaze Lonniversity Daze]]", and "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E44HeroHamton Hero Hamton]]") outsourced to a domestic animation studio based in Nevada called Creator/EncoreCartoons. However, Encore turned in results that were ''far'' below the standards the crew was looking for. When the crew sent for retakes, they ended up with results that were just as bad if not worse. The crew eventually ran out of time to get better animation (by which point the episodes, meant to be the third, sixth, and tenth episodes of the season respectively, had ended up being pushed back to the middle of the season) and had no choice but to either use the best takes in the final episodes or have other studio Creator/KennedyCartoons replace some of the worst animation, and they still have some of the worst animation and OffModel moments of the series. The episodes' troubled production was lampshaded numerously in "Strange Tales" (via LeaningOnTheFourthWall and the obligatory CreditsGag: "Number of Retakes: Don't Ask"), which also notably had AlanSmithee credits for two of the included shorts.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' had several episodes (specifically, Season 1 episodes "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E38StrangeTalesOfWeirdScience Strange Tales of Weird Science]]", "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E42LooniversityDaze Lonniversity Daze]]", and "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E44HeroHamton Hero Hamton]]") outsourced to a domestic animation studio based in Nevada called Creator/EncoreCartoons. However, Encore turned in results that were ''far'' below the standards the crew was looking for. When the crew sent for retakes, they ended up with results that were just as bad if not worse. The crew eventually ran out of time to get better animation (by which point the episodes, meant to be the third, sixth, and tenth episodes of the season respectively, had ended up being pushed back to the middle of the season) and had no choice but to either use the best Encore takes in the final episodes or have other studio studios such as Creator/KennedyCartoons or [[Creator/JonMcClenahan Startoons]] replace some of the worst animation, and they animation. Even with the best takes, these three episodes still have ended up with some of the worst animation and OffModel moments of the entire series. The episodes' troubled production was lampshaded numerously in "Strange Tales" (via LeaningOnTheFourthWall self-deprecating dialogue that was added in during its production and the obligatory CreditsGag: "Number of Retakes: Don't Ask"), which also notably had AlanSmithee credits for two of the included shorts.shorts. Needless to say, the crew never worked with Encore again after the disastrous production of these three episodes. The aforementioned Kennedy Cartoons itself had very inconsistent animation quality (going from fluid and energetic animation to horrendously sloppy OffModel animation and character designs at the drop of a hat) that resulted in a few episodes being held up in production as well[[labelnote:notably...]]"[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E18HareTodayGoneTomorrow Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow]], which was the first episode in production order (but became the 18th episode) and also threw shade at itself in its CreditsGag ("Moral of the Story: We Need More Animators") and "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E65HighToon High Toon]]", which ended up being held up until more than a month after the intended season finale "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E64KACMETV K-ACME TV]]"[[/labelnote]]. Like Encore, Kennedy Cartoons was shown the door after the season's end.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' had several episodes (specifically, Season 1 episodes "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E38StrangeTalesOfWeirdScience Strange Tales of Weird Science]]", "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E42LooniversityDaze Lonniversity Daze]]", and "[[Recap/TinyToonAdventuresS1E44HeroHamton Hero Hamton]]") outsourced to a domestic animation studio based in Nevada called Creator/EncoreCartoons. However, Encore turned in results that were ''far'' below the standards the crew was looking for. When the crew sent for retakes, they ended up with results that were just as bad if not worse. The crew eventually ran out of time to get better animation (by which point the episodes, meant to be the third, sixth, and tenth episodes of the season respectively, had ended up being pushed back to the middle of the season) and had no choice but to either use the best takes in the final episodes or have other studio Creator/KennedyCartoons replace some of the worst animation, and they still have some of the worst animation and OffModel moments of the series. The episodes' troubled production was lampshaded numerously in "Strange Tales" (via LeaningOnTheFourthWall and the obligatory CreditsGag: "Number of Retakes: Don't Ask"), which also notably had AlanSmithee credits for two of the included shorts.


* Downplayed with ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. While the production had no more significant struggles than the average television animation production, the "troubled" aspect comes from creator Alex Hirsch's lack of experience in being a showrunner. By the time the first season wrapped, Hirsch was so burnt out from the experience that he wanted to end the series right there, regardless of popularity, leaving it forever on a {{Cliffhanger}}. He credited the existence of the show's second season to Creator/JonStewart, a BigNameFan who was horrified at the idea and convinced him to press on. Even then, Hirsch would cut the planned three-season MythArc down to two and try (and fail) to argue for a shorter season order. The show's erratic scheduling during its final season was partly the result of Disney executives wanting to stretch the show out longer, in hopes that Hirsch would eventually change his mind about ending their most popular animated series.

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* Downplayed ''WesternAnimation/GlitchTechs'': On January 9, 2019, the crew for the show walked into work only to discover that [[https://www.cartoonbrew.com/business/nickelodeon-froze-production-laid-off-significant-crew-on-its-upcoming-series-glitch-techs-169049.html production had been "frozen" on the series]] in the middle of producing a ten-episode second season, and that anyone not required for post-production on the original 20-episode season one order was being immediately laid off.
* {{Downplayed|Trope}}
with ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. While the production had no more significant struggles than the average television animation production, the "troubled" aspect comes from creator Alex Hirsch's lack of experience in being a showrunner. By the time the first season wrapped, Hirsch was so burnt out from the experience that he wanted to end the series right there, regardless of popularity, leaving it forever on a {{Cliffhanger}}. He credited the existence of the show's second season to Creator/JonStewart, a BigNameFan who was horrified at the idea and convinced him to press on. Even then, Hirsch would cut the planned three-season MythArc down to two and try (and fail) to argue for a shorter season order. The show's erratic scheduling during its final season was partly the result of Disney executives wanting to stretch the show out longer, in hopes that Hirsch would eventually change his mind about ending their most popular animated series.


* According to WordOfGod from ''WesternAnimation/{{Foofur}}'' creator and ''WesternAnimation/StarStreetTheAdventuresOfTheStarKids'' producer Phil Mendez, his most notable work ''WesternAnimation/{{Kissyfur}}'' was plagued with ExecutiveMeddling for it's Saturday morning show. [=NBC=] wanted to call the show ''Paddlecab County'' but Mendez refused, wanting to name the show after it's titular character since his son accidentally came up with due to "Kissyfur" being how his son Christopher said his name when he had a tooth missing.

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* According to WordOfGod from ''WesternAnimation/{{Foofur}}'' creator and ''WesternAnimation/StarStreetTheAdventuresOfTheStarKids'' producer Phil Mendez, his most notable work ''WesternAnimation/{{Kissyfur}}'' was plagued with ExecutiveMeddling for it's its Saturday morning show. [=NBC=] wanted to call the show ''Paddlecab County'' but Mendez refused, wanting to name the show after it's its titular character since his son accidentally came up with due to "Kissyfur" being how his son Christopher said his name when he had a tooth missing.

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* According to WordOfGod from ''WesternAnimation/{{Foofur}}'' creator and ''WesternAnimation/StarStreetTheAdventuresOfTheStarKids'' producer Phil Mendez, his most notable work ''WesternAnimation/{{Kissyfur}}'' was plagued with ExecutiveMeddling for it's Saturday morning show. [=NBC=] wanted to call the show ''Paddlecab County'' but Mendez refused, wanting to name the show after it's titular character since his son accidentally came up with due to "Kissyfur" being how his son Christopher said his name when he had a tooth missing.


* The 1973 [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises [=DePatie=]-Freleng]] show ''Bailey's Comets'' was a production nightmare due to LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters. The show was a ''WesternAnimation/WackyRaces'' ripoff featuring 15 rollerskating teams, each with six members. As everybody was rollerskating, this meant that literally dozens of characters had to be constantly moving, something that's hard to achieve with the tight TV animation schedule.[[note]]By contrast, ''Wacky Races'' was able to keep the animation costs down by having everybody inside a car, thus only having to animate the wheels.[[/note]] Even creating the stock animation of each team rollerskating was a headache on its own. In order to ensure they could finish the show in time, they had to hire a night crew (mostly people moonlighting from Hanna-Barbera and Filmation) to paint the cels. In the end, the show not only went overbudget, it got poor ratings, prompting CBS to move the show to Sunday mornings after a few months. One animator claimed the series nearly broke the studio.

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* The 1973 [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises [=DePatie=]-Freleng]] show ''Bailey's Comets'' was a production nightmare due to LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters. The show was a ''WesternAnimation/WackyRaces'' ripoff featuring 15 rollerskating teams, each with six members. As everybody was rollerskating, this meant that literally dozens of characters had to be constantly moving, something that's hard to achieve with the tight TV animation schedule.[[note]]By contrast, ''Wacky Races'' was able to keep the animation costs down by having everybody inside a car, thus only having to animate the wheels.wheels, though it still animated the characters when the script called for it.[[/note]] Even creating the stock animation of each team rollerskating was a headache on its own. In order to ensure they could finish the show in time, they had to hire a night crew (mostly people moonlighting from Hanna-Barbera and Filmation) to paint the cels. In the end, the show not only went overbudget, it got poor ratings, prompting CBS to move the show to Sunday mornings after a few months. One animator claimed the series nearly broke the studio.


* ''WesternAnimation/IronMan'' was also a mess behind the scenes, with Marvel viewing it [[MerchandiseDriven as an afterthought whose sole purpose was to sell toys]]. The second season had no producer until three months into production, which resulted in 2-hour work days with no weekends off. The staff also had little say in things about plots and character designs, which were largely dictated by Marvel and Toy Biz.

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* ''WesternAnimation/IronMan'' was also a mess behind the scenes, with Marvel viewing it [[MerchandiseDriven as an afterthought whose sole purpose was to sell toys]]. The second season had no producer until three months into production, which resulted in 2-hour 24-hour work days with no weekends off. The staff also had little say in things about plots and character designs, which were largely dictated by Marvel and Toy Biz.


* This happened to the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' episode "Serious Business". [[https://www.cbr.com/teen-titans-go-producers-horvath-jelenic-on-the-importance-of-bathroom-humor/ According to this article]], the creative executive for the show said that the original opening of the episode would not get past the censors, so a new song was written for it. It's quite possible that there was a few more things they objected to before it hit the airwaves, as said song's instrumental appears in "Waffles", which aired eight months before "Serious Business".

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* This happened to the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' episode "Serious Business". [[https://www.cbr.com/teen-titans-go-producers-horvath-jelenic-on-the-importance-of-bathroom-humor/ According to this article]], the creative executive for the show said that the original opening of the episode would not get past the censors, so a new song was written for it. It's quite possible that there was were a few more things they objected to before it hit the airwaves, as said song's instrumental appears in "Waffles", which aired eight months before "Serious Business".


* Downplayed with ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. While the production had no more significant struggles than the average television animation production, the "troubled" aspect comes from creator Alex Hirsch's lack of experience in being a showrunner. By the time the first season wrapped, Hirsch was so burnt out from the experience that he seriously considered ending the series right there, regardless of popularity, leaving it forever on a {{Cliffhanger}}. It wasn't until he shared his plans with Creator/JonStewart, who was horrified at the idea, that he decided to press on, albeit cutting the three-season MythArc down to two and trying (and failing) to argue for a shorter season order. The show's erratic scheduling during its final season was partly the result of Disney executives wanting to stretch the show out longer, in hopes that Hirsch would eventually change his mind about ending their most popular animated series.

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* Downplayed with ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. While the production had no more significant struggles than the average television animation production, the "troubled" aspect comes from creator Alex Hirsch's lack of experience in being a showrunner. By the time the first season wrapped, Hirsch was so burnt out from the experience that he seriously considered ending wanted to end the series right there, regardless of popularity, leaving it forever on a {{Cliffhanger}}. It wasn't until he shared his plans with He credited the existence of the show's second season to Creator/JonStewart, a BigNameFan who was horrified at the idea, that he decided idea and convinced him to press on, albeit cutting on. Even then, Hirsch would cut the planned three-season MythArc down to two and trying try (and failing) fail) to argue for a shorter season order. The show's erratic scheduling during its final season was partly the result of Disney executives wanting to stretch the show out longer, in hopes that Hirsch would eventually change his mind about ending their most popular animated series.


** Later on, in 2003, John K. relaunched the show as ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpyAdultPartyCartoon'', part of an adult animation block on Spike TV. The show once more suffered from ScheduleSlip, though the censorship fights at Nickelodeon were inverted at Spike TV; John K. maintains that Spike TV pressured him to turn ''up'' the adult content farther than he was willing to go. Just like the former series, episodes were submitted past the deadline, which caused the series to go on hiatus. By August 2004, when Spike TV cancelled all of it's animated projects, only six episodes were fully completed, effectively ending the series.

to:

** Later on, in 2003, John K. relaunched the show as ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpyAdultPartyCartoon'', part of an adult animation block on Spike TV. The show once more suffered from ScheduleSlip, though the censorship fights at Nickelodeon were inverted at Spike TV; John K. maintains that Spike TV pressured him to turn ''up'' the adult content farther than he was willing to go. Just like the former series, episodes were submitted past the deadline, which caused the series to go on hiatus. By August 2004, when Spike TV cancelled all of it's its animated projects, only six episodes were fully completed, effectively ending the series.


** Many of the season 1 episodes were massacred by bad outsourcing, due in part to work from the cheapskate, sweatshop conditions of Creator/FilCartoons, who handled ink-and-paint work for the entire first season, and more often than not heavily ruined many scenes due to their all-around cheap Xeroxing, ugly colors and even "reworking" drawings or whole scenes of animation; there were even some unintentional (rather than purposeful) off-model moments, such as Stimpy's eyes inexplicably turning black in the "Stimpy's Breakfast Tips" [[note]]It was supposed to be a placeholder for a separate level of animation photographed in front of it, specifically of Stimpy's actual eyes, but that bit of animation was thrown out. They had the option of doing a retake, but John was so amused by the error that he decided to [[ThrowItIn leave it in.]] [[/note]] and Ren accidentally having two elephant trunks on him instead of one in "Black Hole". [[note]]specifically, Ren's trunk is supposed to shift off to the side when he looks at his watch, but a mistake left the animated part of his trunk moving, but with a top drawing of his trunk kept static above it, making it seem like he now has two trunks [[/note]]. Carbunkle director Bob Jacques had to fight tooth and claw to get the studio to turn in acceptable work for episodes like "Stimpy's Invention" (and even then the sporadic error slipped in, such as Stimpy's eyes floating off his face when he's showing Ren his new socks), and described the experience of working with them as "all damage control".

to:

** Many of the season Season 1 episodes were massacred by bad outsourcing, due in part to work from the cheapskate, sweatshop conditions of Creator/FilCartoons, who handled ink-and-paint work for the entire first season, and more often than not heavily ruined many scenes due to their all-around cheap Xeroxing, ugly colors and even "reworking" drawings or whole scenes of animation; there were even some unintentional (rather than purposeful) off-model moments, such as Stimpy's eyes inexplicably turning black in the "Stimpy's Breakfast Tips" [[note]]It was supposed to be a placeholder for a separate level of animation photographed in front of it, specifically of Stimpy's actual eyes, but that bit of animation was thrown out. They had the option of doing a retake, but John was so amused by the error that he decided to [[ThrowItIn leave it in.]] [[/note]] and Ren accidentally having two elephant trunks on him instead of one in "Black Hole". [[note]]specifically, Ren's trunk is supposed to shift off to the side when he looks at his watch, but a mistake left the animated part of his trunk moving, but with a top drawing of his trunk kept static above it, making it seem like he now has two trunks [[/note]]. Carbunkle director Bob Jacques had to fight tooth and claw to get the studio to turn in acceptable work for episodes like "Stimpy's Invention" (and even then the sporadic error slipped in, such as Stimpy's eyes floating off his face when he's showing Ren his new socks), and described the experience of working with them as "all damage control".



** Later on, in 2003, John K. relaunched the show as ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpyAdultPartyCartoon'', part of an adult animation block on Spike TV. The show once more suffered from ScheduleSlip, though the censorship fights at Nickelodeon were inverted at Spike TV; John K. maintains that Spike TV pressured him to turn ''up'' the adult content farther than he was willing to go. Just like the former series, episodes were submitted passed the deadline, which cause the series to go on hiatus, but by August 2004, when Spike TV cancelled all of it's animated projects, only six episodes were fully completed, effectively ending the series.

to:

** Later on, in 2003, John K. relaunched the show as ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpyAdultPartyCartoon'', part of an adult animation block on Spike TV. The show once more suffered from ScheduleSlip, though the censorship fights at Nickelodeon were inverted at Spike TV; John K. maintains that Spike TV pressured him to turn ''up'' the adult content farther than he was willing to go. Just like the former series, episodes were submitted passed past the deadline, which cause caused the series to go on hiatus, but by hiatus. By August 2004, when Spike TV cancelled all of it's animated projects, only six episodes were fully completed, effectively ending the series.


** Later on, in 2003, John K. relaunched the show as ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpyAdultPartyCartoon'', part of an adult animation block on Spike TV. The show once more suffered from ScheduleSlip, though the censorship fights at Nickelodeon were inverted at Spike TV; John K. maintains that Spike TV pressured him to turn ''up'' the adult content farther than he was willing to go. In any case, the show only lasted two months and seven episodes (the pilot being the previously-unaired "Man's Best Friend") before being canceled.

to:

** Later on, in 2003, John K. relaunched the show as ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpyAdultPartyCartoon'', part of an adult animation block on Spike TV. The show once more suffered from ScheduleSlip, though the censorship fights at Nickelodeon were inverted at Spike TV; John K. maintains that Spike TV pressured him to turn ''up'' the adult content farther than he was willing to go. In any case, Just like the show only lasted two months and seven former series, episodes (the pilot being were submitted passed the previously-unaired "Man's Best Friend") before being canceled.deadline, which cause the series to go on hiatus, but by August 2004, when Spike TV cancelled all of it's animated projects, only six episodes were fully completed, effectively ending the series.

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