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** Before the episode was broadcast, Roddenberry publicly badmouthed Ellison's work on the episode, which infuriated the writer and caused him to demand that he be credited under his pseudonym, "Cordwainer Bird". Since it was already widely known even in 1967 that he used this to flag works which had been wrecked by ExecutiveMeddling, and that this would [[TaintedByThePreview cause viewers to expect the episode to suck even before watching it]], Roddenberry used every means he could to drag out the Writer's Guild arbitration process until the episode was ready to air, and it was too late to do anything more about it. (Rodenberry also wanted to avoid the "Bird" credit because he feared it would discourage good sci-fi writers from contributing to the show.) However, this also meant that Fontana, who should have been credited as co-writer, ended up having to go without credit. In fact, Fontana's identity as the person who wrote the final teleplay wasn't revealed to Ellison (and, by extension, the general public) until many years later, when he wrote his tell-all book about his experiences writing the episode. (Until then, the assumption had been that Roddenberry, Coon, or all the staff writers by committee had rewritten it.)

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** Before the episode was broadcast, Roddenberry publicly badmouthed Ellison's work on the episode, which infuriated the writer and caused him to demand that he be credited under his pseudonym, "Cordwainer Bird". Since it was already widely known even in 1967 that [[AlanSmithee he used this to flag works which had been wrecked wrecked]] by ExecutiveMeddling, and that this would [[TaintedByThePreview cause viewers to expect the episode to suck even before watching it]], Roddenberry used every means he could to drag out the Writer's Guild arbitration process until the episode was ready to air, and it was too late to do anything more about it. (Rodenberry also wanted to avoid the "Bird" credit because he feared it would discourage good sci-fi writers from contributing to the show.) However, this also meant that Fontana, who should have been credited as co-writer, ended up having to go without credit. In fact, Fontana's identity as the person who wrote the final teleplay wasn't revealed to Ellison (and, by extension, the general public) until many years later, when he wrote his tell-all book about his experiences writing the episode. (Until then, the assumption had been that Roddenberry, Coon, or all the staff writers by committee had rewritten it.)


* IDidWhatIHadToDo: James Blish wrote the short-story adaptations for many of the episodes. When he wrote this one, it's subtly hinted that Spock was going to kill Edith himself, it that was what it took to restore the timeline. If the actual episode, Spock does -very gently- chide Kirk for catching Edith when she was falling down a flight of stairs, reminding him that he will have to ''think'', not ''act'', when the moment comes.



* PlayingAgainstType: Creator/JoanCollins, both at the time (she made her name playing ingenue bombshells in TheFifties) and in retrospect (her most famous role is as the amoral, conniving diva Alexis from ''Series/{{Dynasty}}'', just about the polar opposite of Edith Keeler in every way). Collins herself likes to comment on her {{Typecasting}} as a villainess by reminding everyone that she played Edith, who to be fair remains one of her most famous roles. Ironically, in a 1983 interview in ''Magazine/{{Playboy}}'', Collins had difficulty remembering the details of her role, even when the interviewer reminded her of her character's romance with Kirk.

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* PlayingAgainstType: Creator/JoanCollins, both at the time (she made her name playing ingenue bombshells in TheFifties) and in retrospect (her most famous role is as the amoral, conniving diva Alexis from ''Series/{{Dynasty}}'', ''Series/Dynasty1981'', just about the polar opposite of Edith Keeler in every way). Collins herself likes to comment on her {{Typecasting}} as a villainess by reminding everyone that she played Edith, who to be fair remains one of her most famous roles. Ironically, in a 1983 interview in ''Magazine/{{Playboy}}'', Collins had difficulty remembering the details of her role, even when the interviewer reminded her of her character's romance with Kirk.


* PlayingAgainstType: Creator/JoanCollins, both at the time (she made her name playing ingenue bombshells in TheFifties) and in retrospect (her most famous role is as the amoral, conniving diva Alexis from ''Series/{{Dynasty}}'', just about the polar opposite of Edith Keeler in every way). Collins herself likes to comment on her TypeCasting as a villainess by reminding everyone that she played Edith, who to be fair remains one of her most famous roles. Ironically, in a 1983 interview in ''{{Playboy}}'', Collins had difficulty remembering the details of her role, even when the interviewer reminded her of her character's romance with Kirk.

to:

* PlayingAgainstType: Creator/JoanCollins, both at the time (she made her name playing ingenue bombshells in TheFifties) and in retrospect (her most famous role is as the amoral, conniving diva Alexis from ''Series/{{Dynasty}}'', just about the polar opposite of Edith Keeler in every way). Collins herself likes to comment on her TypeCasting {{Typecasting}} as a villainess by reminding everyone that she played Edith, who to be fair remains one of her most famous roles. Ironically, in a 1983 interview in ''{{Playboy}}'', ''Magazine/{{Playboy}}'', Collins had difficulty remembering the details of her role, even when the interviewer reminded her of her character's romance with Kirk.

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* IDidWhatIHadToDo: James Blish wrote the short-story adaptations for many of the episodes. When he wrote this one, it's subtly hinted that Spock was going to kill Edith himself, it that was what it took to restore the timeline. If the actual episode, Spock does -very gently- chide Kirk for catching Edith when she was falling down a flight of stairs, reminding him that he will have to ''think'', not ''act'', when the moment comes.


* PlayingAgainstType: Creator/JoanCollins, both at the time (she made her name playing ingenue bombshells in TheFifties) and in retrospect (her most famous role is as the amoral, conniving diva Alexis from ''Series/{{Dynasty}}'', just about the polar opposite of Edith Keeler in every way). Collins herself likes to comment on her TypeCasting as a villainess by reminding everyone that she played Edith, who to be fair remains one of her most famous roles.

to:

* PlayingAgainstType: Creator/JoanCollins, both at the time (she made her name playing ingenue bombshells in TheFifties) and in retrospect (her most famous role is as the amoral, conniving diva Alexis from ''Series/{{Dynasty}}'', just about the polar opposite of Edith Keeler in every way). Collins herself likes to comment on her TypeCasting as a villainess by reminding everyone that she played Edith, who to be fair remains one of her most famous roles. Ironically, in a 1983 interview in ''{{Playboy}}'', Collins had difficulty remembering the details of her role, even when the interviewer reminded her of her character's romance with Kirk.


** Before the episode was broadcast, Roddenberry publicly badmouthed Ellison's work on the episode, which infuriated the writer and caused him to demand that he be credited under his pseudonym, "Cordwainer Bird". Since it was already widely known even in 1967 that he used this to flag works which had been wrecked by ExecutiveMeddling, and that this would [[TaintedByThePreview cause viewers to expect the episode to suck even before watching it]], Roddenberry used every means he could to drag out the Writer's Guild arbitration process until the episode was ready to air, and it was too late to do anything more about it. However, this also meant that Fontana, who should have been credited as co-writer, ended up having to go without credit. In fact, Fontana's identity as the person who wrote the final teleplay wasn't revealed to Ellison (and, by extension, the general public) until many years later, when he wrote his tell-all book about his experiences writing the episode. (Until then, the assumption had been that Roddenberry, Coon, or all the staff writers by committee had rewritten it.)

to:

** Before the episode was broadcast, Roddenberry publicly badmouthed Ellison's work on the episode, which infuriated the writer and caused him to demand that he be credited under his pseudonym, "Cordwainer Bird". Since it was already widely known even in 1967 that he used this to flag works which had been wrecked by ExecutiveMeddling, and that this would [[TaintedByThePreview cause viewers to expect the episode to suck even before watching it]], Roddenberry used every means he could to drag out the Writer's Guild arbitration process until the episode was ready to air, and it was too late to do anything more about it. (Rodenberry also wanted to avoid the "Bird" credit because he feared it would discourage good sci-fi writers from contributing to the show.) However, this also meant that Fontana, who should have been credited as co-writer, ended up having to go without credit. In fact, Fontana's identity as the person who wrote the final teleplay wasn't revealed to Ellison (and, by extension, the general public) until many years later, when he wrote his tell-all book about his experiences writing the episode. (Until then, the assumption had been that Roddenberry, Coon, or all the staff writers by committee had rewritten it.)


** Creator/HarlanEllison's first draft was agreed by just about everyone to be a masterpiece in its own right, but didn't really feel like a ''Star Trek'' episode, with Creator/GeneRoddenberry's chief complaint being the inclusion of a drug-dealing character who helps get the plot of the episode underway, along with Kirk having him executed via firing squad in the episode's climax. On top of that, Ellison added in an element of barely-suppressed racial undertension between Kirk and Spock, even though Kirk making such remarks had served as an instant OutOfCharacterAlert in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" earlier in that season. It should be noted that in 1966 it is ''highly'' unlikely that NBC's censors would have allowed the drug-dealing aspect to have been televised, anyway.

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** Creator/HarlanEllison's first draft was agreed by just about everyone to be a masterpiece in its own right, but didn't really feel like a ''Star Trek'' episode, with Creator/GeneRoddenberry's chief complaint being the inclusion of a drug-dealing character who helps get the plot of the episode underway, along with Kirk having him executed via firing squad in the episode's climax. Ellison figured that even in the future a military outfit like Starfleet would have some unsavory characters. On top of that, Ellison added in an element of barely-suppressed racial undertension between Kirk and Spock, even though Kirk making such remarks had served as an instant OutOfCharacterAlert in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" earlier in that season. It should be noted that in 1966 it is ''highly'' unlikely that NBC's censors would have allowed the drug-dealing aspect to have been televised, anyway.anyway, even though it was emphatically DrugsAreBad.

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* RecycledSet: The New York streets that Kirk and Edith walk down are the Mayberry set from ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow''.

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* The original finale also included a YouCalledMeXItMustBeSerious moment when Spock calls his captain "Jim" for the first time, then gently invites him to come to Vulcan to rest, saying it is peaceful there, "the nights are very long. In the morning, there is the sound of silver birds against the sky." Most fans encountered this poetic line via James Blish's adaption. FanFic about Vulcan often includes those silver birds; there have even been songs written about them. The epic ''[[http://www.simegen.com/fandom/startrek/kraith/ Kraith]]'' series by Jacqueline Lichtenberg has Kirk at last accepting that invitation, in "[[http://www.simegen.com/fandom/startrek/kraith/kc001/kc01_11.html Spock's Mission]]."

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* InspirationForTheWork: Creator/HarlanEllison was inspired by reading a biography of evangelist Aimee Semple [=McPherson=] and thought that it would be an interesting idea to have Kirk travel back in time and fall in love with a similar woman of good intent, but someone who must die in order to preserve the future. Ellison considered that it would have a heartrending effect on Kirk.


* PlayingAgainstType: Creator/JoanCollins, both at the time (she made her name playing ingenue bombshells in TheFifties) and in retrospect (her most famous role is as the amoral, conniving diva Alexis from ''Series/{{Dynasty}}'', just about the polar opposite of Edith Keeler in every way). Collins herself likes to comment on her TypeCasting as a villainness by reminding everyone that she played Edith, who to be fair remains one of her most famous roles.

to:

* PlayingAgainstType: Creator/JoanCollins, both at the time (she made her name playing ingenue bombshells in TheFifties) and in retrospect (her most famous role is as the amoral, conniving diva Alexis from ''Series/{{Dynasty}}'', just about the polar opposite of Edith Keeler in every way). Collins herself likes to comment on her TypeCasting as a villainness villainess by reminding everyone that she played Edith, who to be fair remains one of her most famous roles.


** In the original story, Kirk and Spock are aided in the 1930s by a vagrant called Rodent who reveals himself to be a veteran of the Battle of the Somme. In the final product, Rodent is the bum who incinerates himself with [=McCoy=]'s phaser.

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** In the original story, Kirk and Spock are aided in the 1930s by a legless vagrant called Rodent Trooper who reveals himself to be a veteran of the Battle of Verdun. Trooper is killed by Beckwith (the drug-dealing crewman) during the Somme. In the final product, Rodent is the bum who incinerates himself episode, but unlike with [=McCoy=]'s phaser.Keeler, the Guardian indicates that Trooper's fate has "negligible" impact on the timeline, to Kirk's distress.


* CreatorsFavoriteEpisode: Creator/GeneRoddenberry named this as one of his ten favourite episodes, Creator/WilliamShatner named it as his second favourite and Creator/LeonardNimoy named it as one his top five. Yeah, this episode's pretty damn good.

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* CreatorsFavoriteEpisode: Creator/GeneRoddenberry named this as one of his ten favourite episodes, Creator/WilliamShatner named it as his second favourite favourite[[note]]his number one was "The Devil in the Dark"[[/note]] and Creator/LeonardNimoy named it as one his top five. Yeah, this episode's pretty damn good.

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* WagTheDirector: According to Creator/HarlanEllison, Creator/WilliamShatner counted how many lines he had in the script and demanded a change when Creator/LeonardNimoy had more lines than him.

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* SoMyKidsCanWatch: Creator/JoanCollins' story at the Star Trek 30th Anniversary of how she got the part of Edith Keeler:
--> In 1967, when my two children finally entered school, I decided I wanted to go back to acting, and soon afterwards, my agent Tom Corman called to say I'd been offered a great part in a ''Franchise/StarTrek'' episode. \\
"Star what?" I said?\\
"It's a huge new cult show," said Tom. "Obviously you haven't been reading the trades."\\
"No, I've been too busy reading ''Mother and Child Care'' by Doctor Spock."\\
"Forget Doctor Spock," he said. "Start thinking ''Mister'' Spock."\\
"Ah, yes!" I said. "Mister Spock, the one the ears? The children love that show!" \\
"Right, then you'd better do it. You'll probably be queen of the universe, possess intergalactic powers, [[{{Stripperiffic}} wear tight, revealing costumes]]. Trust me, I'm your agent."\\
A week later I was cast as Edith Keeler, a saintly Earthling, who works as a social worker in a 1930s mission for down-and-out bums in New York's Bowery. Thanks, Tom.

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