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* TechnologyMarchesOn: Goofy uses a road map to navigate, which becomes a major plot point when [[spoiler:Max changes it]]. Today, the writers would either have to explain why he doesn't use a GPS or come up with some other way to have [[spoiler:his son trick him]].

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* ScrewedByTheNetwork: The film was seen as a contractual obligation work following the tempestuous departure of Jeffrey Katzenberg, who had greenlit the film, and so Disney didn't do much to promote the film leading up to its release, resulting in it doing poorly at the box office.


* MilestoneCelebration: D23 hosted 20th and 25th anniversary panels, featuring much of the cast and crew. The latter was done in a conference call during the coronavirus pandemic, and included a virtual watch party for the film, live tweeted by Lima and Farmer.

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* MilestoneCelebration: D23 hosted 20th and 25th anniversary panels, featuring much of the cast and crew. The latter was done in a conference call during the coronavirus pandemic, and included a virtual watch party for the film, live tweeted live-tweeted by Lima and Farmer.



** In an unusual same person scenario, Creator/BillFarmer recorded his lines as Goofy using his normal speaking voice due to Jeffrey Katzenberg's prodding. After a few sessions, everyone agreed that Goofy's voice should stay the same, and Farmer rerecorded his lines with the character's trademark voice.

to:

** In an unusual same person same-person scenario, Creator/BillFarmer recorded his lines as Goofy using his normal speaking voice due to Jeffrey Katzenberg's prodding. After a few sessions, everyone agreed that Goofy's voice should stay the same, and Farmer rerecorded his lines with the character's trademark voice.



** Jeffrey Katzenberg felt that audiences wouldn't tolerate listening to Goofy's trademark cartoonie voice for ninety minutes and, at one point, considered replacing Bill Farmer with Creator/SteveMartin. When it was decided that Farmer would stay, Katzenberg instead had Farmer record Goofy's lines in his normal speaking voice instead of his "cartoony" one. However, after a few sessions, Farmer, along with director Kevin Lima and studio head Roy E. Disney, agreed that nobody wanted to hear Goofy having any voice than the one they all knew and loved, and Farmer re-recorded his lines accordingly.

to:

** Jeffrey Katzenberg felt that audiences wouldn't tolerate listening to Goofy's trademark cartoonie cartoony voice for ninety minutes and, at one point, considered replacing Bill Farmer with Creator/SteveMartin. When it was decided that Farmer would stay, Katzenberg instead had Farmer record Goofy's lines in his normal speaking voice instead of his "cartoony" one. However, after a few sessions, Farmer, along with director Kevin Lima and studio head Roy E. Disney, agreed that nobody wanted to hear Goofy having any voice than the one they all knew and loved, and Farmer re-recorded his lines accordingly.


** In the Latin American Spanish dub, while Francisco Colmenero reprised his role as Pete, Creator/CarlosSegundo replaced Colmenero as the official voice of Goofy beginning with this movie. Segundo himself would eventually be replaced by Mario Filio.

to:

** In the Latin American Spanish dub, while Francisco Colmenero reprised his role as Pete, Creator/CarlosSegundo replaced Colmenero as the official voice of Goofy beginning with this movie. Segundo himself would eventually be replaced by Mario Filio.


* CreatorCameo: Director Kevin Lima has a handful of minor roles as Lester the Possum, Roxanne's dad and the security guard at the concert. Caricatures of him and writer Brian Pimental appear in the “After Today” opening number.



** A strange case. For his one line in "After Today" ("And up with the comics"), the Trekkie with braces is voiced by Eddie Deezen, but when cat-calling Stacey he's voiced by Creator/DanteBasco.

to:

** A strange case. For his one line in "After Today" ("And up with the comics"), the Trekkie with braces is voiced by Eddie Deezen, Creator/EddieDeezen, but when cat-calling Stacey he's voiced by Creator/DanteBasco.



** In an unusual same person scenario, Bill Farmer recorded his lines as Goofy using his normal speaking voice due to Jeffrey Katzenberg's prodding. After a few sessions, everyone agreed that Goofy's voice should stay the same, and Farmer rerecorded his lines with the character's trademark voice.

to:

** In an unusual same person scenario, Bill Farmer Creator/BillFarmer recorded his lines as Goofy using his normal speaking voice due to Jeffrey Katzenberg's prodding. After a few sessions, everyone agreed that Goofy's voice should stay the same, and Farmer rerecorded his lines with the character's trademark voice.voice.
** Music/BobbyBrown was originally cast as Powerline, but was cut from the production due to his drug problems. A couple of the songs he recorded for the part were later reworked as tracks for his album ''Forever''.



* UncreditedRole: Pauly Shore is not credited as Bobby.

to:

* UncreditedRole: Pauly Shore Creator/PaulyShore is not credited as Bobby.



* VoicesInOneRoom: Bill Farmer mentioned how he [[https://mobile.twitter.com/GoofyBill/status/1248768016394776576 and]] Jason Marsden recorded many of their lines together.

to:

* VoicesInOneRoom: Bill Farmer Creator/BillFarmer mentioned how he [[https://mobile.twitter.com/GoofyBill/status/1248768016394776576 and]] Jason Marsden Creator/JasonMarsden recorded many of their lines together.



** Music/BobbyBrown was originally cast as Powerline, but was cut from the production due to his drug problems. A couple of the songs he recorded for the part were later reworked as tracks for his album ''Forever''.



** Originally, a bear was going to invade the campground instead of Bigfoot.

to:

** Originally, a bear was going to invade the campground instead of Bigfoot.Bigfoot.
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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: One of the best exampled of pure undistilled [[TheNineties nineties]] culture committed to animated film: everyone's dressed in flannel and baggy clothes, Pauly Shore plays yet another variation of his "Weasel" character, the soundtrack is full of NewJackSwing-style pop and Pete passively refers to his and Goofy's sons as "the MTV generation." It also captures the time in the mid-90s when live pay-per-view specials were big events, mainly because they were still AppointmentTelevision; today, not only can even the biggest livestreamed events be watched on one's mobile device rather than requiring them to sit in front of the TV, but the entire broadcast can be viewed immediately after it's initial airing. Like many [[AnimationLeadTime animated]] examples, much of this has been dated for a couple of years by the time the movie came out, though unlike most, it's less the result of trying to capitalize on trends (save Pauly Shore, who's peek popularity at the time would come crashing down a year later thanks to ''Film/BioDome'') and more a circumstance of a plot that's largely grounded in reality.

to:

* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: One of the best exampled of pure undistilled [[TheNineties nineties]] culture committed to animated film: everyone's dressed in flannel and baggy clothes, Pauly Shore plays yet another variation of his "Weasel" character, the soundtrack is full of NewJackSwing-style pop and Pete passively refers to his and Goofy's sons as "the MTV generation." It also captures the time in the mid-90s when live pay-per-view specials were big events, mainly because they were still AppointmentTelevision; today, not only can even the biggest livestreamed live events be watched on one's mobile device rather than requiring them to sit in front of the TV, device, but the entire broadcast can be viewed immediately after it's its initial airing. Like many [[AnimationLeadTime animated]] examples, much of this has been dated for a couple of years by the time the movie came out, though unlike most, it's less the result of trying to capitalize on trends (save Pauly Shore, who's peek whose peak popularity at the time would come crashing down a year later thanks to ''Film/BioDome'') and more a circumstance of a plot that's largely grounded in reality.



** Jeffrey Katzenberg felt that audiences wouldn't tolerate listening to Goofy's trademark cartoonie voice for ninety minutes and, at one point, considered replacing Bill Farmer with Creator/SteveMartin. When it was decided that Farmer would stay, Katzenberg instead had Farmer record Goofy's lines in his normal speaking voice instead of his "cartoonie" one. However, after a few sessions, Farmer, along with director Kevin Lima and studio head Roy E. Disney, agreed that nobody wanted to hear Goofy having any voice than the one they all knew and loved, and Farmer re-recorded his lines accordingly.

to:

** Jeffrey Katzenberg felt that audiences wouldn't tolerate listening to Goofy's trademark cartoonie voice for ninety minutes and, at one point, considered replacing Bill Farmer with Creator/SteveMartin. When it was decided that Farmer would stay, Katzenberg instead had Farmer record Goofy's lines in his normal speaking voice instead of his "cartoonie" "cartoony" one. However, after a few sessions, Farmer, along with director Kevin Lima and studio head Roy E. Disney, agreed that nobody wanted to hear Goofy having any voice than the one they all knew and loved, and Farmer re-recorded his lines accordingly.


** Jason Marsden replacing Dana Hill as the ''de facto'' voice of Max, due to the latter growing up.

to:

** Jason Marsden replacing Dana Hill as the ''de facto'' voice of Max, due to the latter growing up. This isn’t a bad thing either, since many people actually prefer him voicing Max.


* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: One of the best exampled of pure undistilled [[TheNineties nineties]] culture committed to animated film: everyone's dressed in flannel and baggy clothes, Pauly Shore plays yet another variation of his "Weasel" character, the soundtrack is full of NewJackSwing-style pop and Pete passively refers to his and Goofy's sons as "the MTV generation." It also captures the time in the mid-90s when live pay-per-view specials were big events, mainly because they were still AppointmentTelevision; today, not only can even the biggest livestreamed events be watched on one's mobile device rather than requiring them to sit in front of the TV, but they're commonly available for viewing on whichever platform they aired on immediately after their broadcast. Like many [[AnimationLeadTime animated]] examples, much of this has been dated for a couple of years by the time the movie came out, though unlike most, it's less the result of trying to capitalize on trends (save Pauly Shore, who's peek popularity at the time would come crashing down a year later thanks to ''Film/BioDome'') and more a circumstance of a plot that's largely grounded in reality.

to:

* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: One of the best exampled of pure undistilled [[TheNineties nineties]] culture committed to animated film: everyone's dressed in flannel and baggy clothes, Pauly Shore plays yet another variation of his "Weasel" character, the soundtrack is full of NewJackSwing-style pop and Pete passively refers to his and Goofy's sons as "the MTV generation." It also captures the time in the mid-90s when live pay-per-view specials were big events, mainly because they were still AppointmentTelevision; today, not only can even the biggest livestreamed events be watched on one's mobile device rather than requiring them to sit in front of the TV, but they're commonly available for viewing on whichever platform they aired on the entire broadcast can be viewed immediately after their broadcast.it's initial airing. Like many [[AnimationLeadTime animated]] examples, much of this has been dated for a couple of years by the time the movie came out, though unlike most, it's less the result of trying to capitalize on trends (save Pauly Shore, who's peek popularity at the time would come crashing down a year later thanks to ''Film/BioDome'') and more a circumstance of a plot that's largely grounded in reality.


* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: One of the best exampled of pure undistilled [[TheNineties nineties]] culture committed to animated film: everyone's dressed in flannel and baggy clothes, Pauly Shore plays yet another variation of his "Weasel" character, the soundtrack is full of NewJackSwing-style pop and Pete passively refers to his and Goofy's sons as "the MTV generation." It also captures the time in the mid-90s when pay-per-view TV specials were big events, mainly because they were still AppointmentTelevision, unlike today, when even the biggest livestreamed events are typically posted online in their entirety after their live broadcast. Like many [[AnimationLeadTime animated]] examples, much of this has been dated for a couple of years by the time the movie came out, though unlike most, it's less the result of trying to capitalize on trends (save Pauly Shore, who's peek popularity at the time would come crashing down a year later thanks to ''Film/BioDome'') and more a circumstance of a plot that's largely grounded in reality.

to:

* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: One of the best exampled of pure undistilled [[TheNineties nineties]] culture committed to animated film: everyone's dressed in flannel and baggy clothes, Pauly Shore plays yet another variation of his "Weasel" character, the soundtrack is full of NewJackSwing-style pop and Pete passively refers to his and Goofy's sons as "the MTV generation." It also captures the time in the mid-90s when live pay-per-view TV specials were big events, mainly because they were still AppointmentTelevision, unlike AppointmentTelevision; today, when not only can even the biggest livestreamed events are typically posted online be watched on one's mobile device rather than requiring them to sit in their entirety front of the TV, but they're commonly available for viewing on whichever platform they aired on immediately after their live broadcast. Like many [[AnimationLeadTime animated]] examples, much of this has been dated for a couple of years by the time the movie came out, though unlike most, it's less the result of trying to capitalize on trends (save Pauly Shore, who's peek popularity at the time would come crashing down a year later thanks to ''Film/BioDome'') and more a circumstance of a plot that's largely grounded in reality.


** Jason Marsden replacing Dana Hill as the ''de facto'' voice of Max. Justified in-universe due to Max growing up.

to:

** Jason Marsden replacing Dana Hill as the ''de facto'' voice of Max. Justified in-universe Max, due to Max the latter growing up.


* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: One of the best exampled of pure undistilled [[TheNineties nineties]] culture committed to animated film: everyone's dressed in flannel and baggy clothes, Pauly Shore plays yet another variation of his "Weasel" character, the soundtrack is full of NewJackSwing-style pop and Pete passively refers to his and Goofy's sons as "the MTV generation." It also captures the time in the mid-90s when pay-per-view was seen as the most high-end form of entertainment before livestreaming and VOD made it less so. Like many [[AnimationLeadTime animated]] examples, much of this has been dated for a couple of years by the time the movie came out, though unlike most, it's less the result of trying to capitalize on trends (save Pauly Shore, who's peek popularity at the time would come crashing down a year later thanks to ''Film/BioDome'') and more a circumstance of a plot that's largely grounded in reality.

to:

* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: One of the best exampled of pure undistilled [[TheNineties nineties]] culture committed to animated film: everyone's dressed in flannel and baggy clothes, Pauly Shore plays yet another variation of his "Weasel" character, the soundtrack is full of NewJackSwing-style pop and Pete passively refers to his and Goofy's sons as "the MTV generation." It also captures the time in the mid-90s when pay-per-view was seen as TV specials were big events, mainly because they were still AppointmentTelevision, unlike today, when even the most high-end form of entertainment before livestreaming and VOD made it less so.biggest livestreamed events are typically posted online in their entirety after their live broadcast. Like many [[AnimationLeadTime animated]] examples, much of this has been dated for a couple of years by the time the movie came out, though unlike most, it's less the result of trying to capitalize on trends (save Pauly Shore, who's peek popularity at the time would come crashing down a year later thanks to ''Film/BioDome'') and more a circumstance of a plot that's largely grounded in reality.


** A strange case. For his one line in "After Today" the Trekkie with braces is voiced by Eddie Deezen, but when cat-calling Stacey he's voiced by Creator/DanteBasco.

to:

** A strange case. For his one line in "After Today" ("And up with the comics"), the Trekkie with braces is voiced by Eddie Deezen, but when cat-calling Stacey he's voiced by Creator/DanteBasco.


** Bobby Brown was originally cast as Powerline, but was cut from the production due to his drug problems. A couple of the songs he recorded for the part were later reworked as tracks for his album ''Forever''.

to:

** Bobby Brown Music/BobbyBrown was originally cast as Powerline, but was cut from the production due to his drug problems. A couple of the songs he recorded for the part were later reworked as tracks for his album ''Forever''.


** Jason Marsden replacing Dana Hill as Max. Justified in-universe due to Max growing up.

to:

** Jason Marsden replacing Dana Hill as the ''de facto'' voice of Max. Justified in-universe due to Max growing up.



** Creator/BillFarmer, Creator/JimCummings and Creator/RobPaulsen reprise their respective roles as Goofy, Pete and P.J. from ''Goof Troop''.

to:

** Creator/BillFarmer, Creator/BillFarmer (Goofy), Creator/JimCummings (Pete) and Creator/RobPaulsen reprise their respective roles as Goofy, Pete and P.(P.J. ) reprised their roles from ''Goof Troop''.


** Lester's Possum Park is actually an OrphanedPunchline to a gag in which Max and Goofy would drive towards a water park that was being advertised for hundreds of miles, only for Goofy to pull into the SuckECheeses ''directly across the road'' from it.

to:

** Lester's Possum Park is actually an OrphanedPunchline to a gag in which Max and Goofy would drive towards a water park that was being advertised for hundreds of miles, only for Goofy to pull into the SuckECheeses ''directly across the road'' from it.[[note]]Interestingly, the Creator/{{Netflix}} adaptation of ''WesternAnimation/GreenEggsAndHam2019'' would use this joke in the episode "Box," but there's nothing to say that one had anything to do with the other.[[/note]]

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