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** Not A Day Goes By is probably the biggest example of this. Chronologically, it is first sung as Beth and Frank are getting married about how they don't want to ever be apart. The next time it is chronologically sung is by Beth after the divorce about how she can't truly move on from Frank no matter how much she wants to.


* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with a HopeSpot where adult Frank returns to stand next to his young, hopeful self, and the two of them smile at each other. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and only a few productions since then have restored it.

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* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with a HopeSpot where adult Frank returns to stand next to smiles at and reconnects with his young, hopeful self, and the two of them smile at each other.younger self. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and only a few productions since then have restored it.


* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with a HopeSpot where adult Frank returns to stand wordlessly next to his young, hopeful self at his own graduation. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and only a few productions since then have restored it.

to:

* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with a HopeSpot where adult Frank returns to stand wordlessly next to his young, hopeful self self, and the two of them smile at his own graduation.each other. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and only a few productions since then have restored it.


* SanitySlippageSong: Downplayed - "Franklin Shepard Inc." doesn't represent a psychotic break, but it ''is'' a meltdown (on national TV, live, no less). Charley is aware enough that he can joke about it -- "Mommy! Mommy! There's a crazy man on my TV!" Played straight in that it's a great place for the singer to show off.

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* SanitySlippageSong: Downplayed - "Franklin Shepard Inc." doesn't represent a psychotic break, but it ''is'' a meltdown (on national TV, live, no less). Charley is aware enough that he can joke about it -- "Mommy! Mommy! "Get the President! There's a crazy man on my TV!" TV screen!" Played straight in that it's a great place for the singer actor to show off.


* LeftItIn: Frank shows off a new song he's working on, and after the line "They're always popping their cork", he mutters, "I'll fix that line". He never gets a chance to, because they get a booking and the show with the song in it goes up too quickly.

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* LeftItIn: Frank shows off a new song he's working on, and after the line "They're While auditioning an earlier version of “Good Thing Going” for Joe Josephson, Charley sings “They’re always popping their cork", cork”, which he mutters, "I'll appends with “I’ll fix that line". He never gets a chance to, because they get a booking line”. Cut to auditions for Frank and Charley’s revue and that line is still there. Eventually averted when the show with the song in it goes up too quickly.final version of “Good Thing Going” is performed.


In 2019, Creator/RichardLinklater announced that he's making a film version, reviving the same method he'd used to make ''Film/{{Boyhood}}'': the 20 years covered in the story will be filmed in real time, with production finishing in 2039. Creator/BlakeJenner plays Franklin, Creator/BenPlatt plays Charley, and Beanie Feldstein plays Mary.

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In 2019, Creator/RichardLinklater announced that he's making a film version, reviving the same method he'd used to make ''Film/{{Boyhood}}'': the 20 years covered in the story will be filmed in real time, with production finishing in 2039. Creator/BlakeJenner plays Franklin, Creator/BenPlatt plays Charley, and Beanie Feldstein Creator/BeanieFeldstein plays Mary.


In 2019, Creator/RichardLinklater announced that he's making a film version, reviving the same method he'd used to make ''Film/{{Boyhood}}'': the 20 years covered in the story will be filmed in real time, with production finishing in 2039. Blake Jenner plays Franklin, Ben Platt plays Charley, and Beanie Feldstein plays Mary.

to:

In 2019, Creator/RichardLinklater announced that he's making a film version, reviving the same method he'd used to make ''Film/{{Boyhood}}'': the 20 years covered in the story will be filmed in real time, with production finishing in 2039. Blake Jenner Creator/BlakeJenner plays Franklin, Ben Platt Creator/BenPlatt plays Charley, and Beanie Feldstein plays Mary.


* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with adult Frank returning to stand wordlessly next to his young, hopeful self at his own graduation. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and only a few productions since then have restored it.

to:

* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with a HopeSpot where adult Frank returning returns to stand wordlessly next to his young, hopeful self at his own graduation. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and only a few productions since then have restored it.


-->'''Julia''': To Richard Niles! Our most fashionable playwright! The man who has everything! And I'd rather be what I am — a drunken whore!

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-->'''Julia''': --->'''Julia''': To Richard Niles! Our most fashionable playwright! The man who has everything! And I'd rather be what I am — a drunken whore!

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** Julia, her counterpart in the original play, even more so.
-->'''Julia''': To Richard Niles! Our most fashionable playwright! The man who has everything! And I'd rather be what I am — a drunken whore!


* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with adult Frank returning to stand wordlessly next to his young, hopeful self at his own graduation. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and ended the show with "Our Time."

to:

* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with adult Frank returning to stand wordlessly next to his young, hopeful self at his own graduation. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and ended the show with "Our Time."only a few productions since then have restored it.

Added DiffLines:

* FramingDevice: The original Broadway production began with an older Frank (played by the only person in the cast over the age of thirty) coming back to his old high school to deliver a speech where he tells the graduating students to give up on their dreams and face life as it is. Rejecting his advice, the students sing the title song and proceed to act out his life in reverse to show how he went wrong. The show ends with adult Frank returning to stand wordlessly next to his young, hopeful self at his own graduation. When the creators rewrote the show after it closed on Broadway, they dropped the framing device and ended the show with "Our Time."


* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: In the original play, the anti-hero's DeadpanSnarker writer friend Julia was based on Creator/Dorothy Parker. This is downplayed with Mary, her counterpart in the musical.

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* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: In the original play, the anti-hero's DeadpanSnarker writer friend Julia was based on Creator/Dorothy Parker.Creator/DorothyParker. This is downplayed with Mary, her counterpart in the musical.


* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: In the original play, the anti-hero's DeadpanSnarker writer friend Julia was based on Dorothy Parker. This is downplayed with Mary, her counterpart in the musical.

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* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: In the original play, the anti-hero's DeadpanSnarker writer friend Julia was based on Dorothy Creator/Dorothy Parker. This is downplayed with Mary, her counterpart in the musical.

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