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* BeatThemAtTheirOwnGame: In ''Insurrection'' [[CorruptPolitician Francois Fouchet]] orders the murder of his political rival Fionna [=MacTaggart=], confident that his immunity from prosecution as a member of the Legislative Assembly will protect him. One of Fionna's political allies [[ConspicuouslyPublicAssassination breaks Fouchet's neck in the middle of the next session]], taking advantage of his own immunity as a member of the Assembly.

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* DoNotGoGentle: All sides tend to fight bitterly when facing inevitable defeat.
-> ''Their role had suddenly narrowed to inflicting as many enemy casualties as possible before their own unavoidable cessation of existence.''


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* NightmareSequence: ''In Death Ground'' has a scene where Admiral Villers is woken from his sleep by klaxon alarms signifying the arrival of the Bugs. Villers prepare for battle, reflecting how even this nightmarish situation is better than the actual nightmare he just woke up from: watching the people of the planet he's protecting be slaughtered, with all of them having the faces of his wife and daughter.


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* YouAreInCommandNow:
** After the first battle in ''In Death Ground,'' the highest-ranking survivor aboard one ship (which is scuttled soon afterward) is the assistant navigator, who was ''ninth'' in the chain of command.
** Later in "In Death Ground," Admiral Teller is told that he is in command of the task force when Admiral Villers decides to HoldTheLine.
** When the first major exclusion into bug territory goes wrong, Admiral Prescott takes command of the fleet after [[spoiler: Admiral Antonov's ship is crippled, and he orders them to leave him.]]

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* SayingTooMuch: In the novel ''Crusade,'' Fleet Chaplain Manuk assures Admiral Lantua that the absence of any reference to "the true faith" in their prisoners' history records can be explained by data manipulation deceiving their ancestors. The knowledge Manuk displays about ''how'' history can be falsified causes Lantua to realize that the Theban church has been falsifying history and lying to the people, which leads to Lantua's HeelFaceTurn.


* EnergyWeapon: Lasers are the first type of beam weapon available to a low-tech civilization. At higher tech levels, an empire may have access to X-ray lasers or high-powered heterodyne lasers. All types of lasers will pass right through a target's shields, but not through a target's physical armor.



* FrickinLaserBeams: Lasers are the first type of beam weapon available to a low-tech civilization. At higher tech levels, an empire may have access to X-ray lasers or high-powered heterodyne lasers. All types of lasers will pass right through a target's shields, but not through a target's physical armor.


* SpiritualSuccessor: The ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series, also by Weber, reuses concepts, technology, personality, even a few names. For example, "Alois Saint-Just" is central to Crusade, and "Oscar Saint-Just" becomes a major character in HH.

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* SpiritualSuccessor: The ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series, also by Weber, reuses concepts, technology, personality, even a few names. For example, "Alois Saint-Just" is central to Crusade, and "Oscar Saint-Just" becomes a major character in HH.


Of particular interest is the fact that Creator/DavidWeber, author of the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series of SF novels, became a contributor to the game starting with the ''Starfire III: Empires'' supplement of the 1st Edition. Some of Weber's online comments about the game, and his involvement with it, can be found [[http://infodump.thefifthimperium.com/series/Starfire/ here]] (the black text on that page is an expandable link container). Weber later teamed up with Steve White to write '''novels''' set in the ''Starfire'' universe, of which 6 have been published so far:

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Of particular interest is the fact that Creator/DavidWeber, author of the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series of SF novels, became a contributor to the game starting with the ''Starfire III: Empires'' supplement of the 1st Edition. Some of Weber's online comments about the game, and his involvement with it, can be found [[http://infodump.thefifthimperium.com/series/Starfire/ here]] (the black text on that page is an expandable link container). Weber later teamed up with Steve White to write '''novels''' set in the ''Starfire'' universe, of which 6 7 have been published so far:




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* ''Imperative'' (by Steve White and Charles E. Gannon)


* ProudWarriorRace: The Khanate of Orion, a thinly-veiled copy of the [[KnownSpace Kzinti]]. The Rigellians, by contrast, are simply out to exterminate the competition.

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* ProudWarriorRace: The Khanate of Orion, a thinly-veiled copy of the [[KnownSpace [[Literature/KnownSpace Kzinti]]. The Rigellians, by contrast, are simply out to exterminate the competition.


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!! The wargame provides examples of:

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!! The This wargame provides examples of:


-->-- Howard Anderson, ''In Death Ground''

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-->-- Howard Anderson, ''In Death Ground''
''Crusade''


Building ships and fighting between individual ships was originally designed to be almost painfully simple, so that the players could focus on fleet tactics. As the game evolved, however, the rules grew more complex, until players needed to keep track of almost as much information per ship as in ''StarFleetBattles''. (Which, coincidentally, was originally written by the same author).

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Building ships and fighting between individual ships was originally designed to be almost painfully simple, so that the players could focus on fleet tactics. As the game evolved, however, the rules grew more complex, until players needed to keep track of almost as much information per ship as in ''StarFleetBattles''.''TabletopGame/StarFleetBattles''. (Which, coincidentally, was originally written by the same author).


Not to be confused with the DCComics character. (For that, see the ''ComicBook/TeenTitans''.) Also bears no relation to the 1980 coin-op UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame ''[[http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=9758 Star Fire]]'', or to the rocket-armed [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-94_Starfire F-94C]], or to the nuclear fusion process that powers actual stars.

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Not to be confused with the DCComics Creator/DCComics character. (For that, see the ''ComicBook/TeenTitans''.) Also bears no relation to the 1980 coin-op UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame ''[[http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=9758 Star Fire]]'', or to the rocket-armed [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-94_Starfire F-94C]], or to the nuclear fusion process that powers actual stars.


Of particular interest is the fact that DavidWeber, author of the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series of SF novels, became a contributor to the game starting with the ''Starfire III: Empires'' supplement of the 1st Edition. Some of Weber's online comments about the game, and his involvement with it, can be found [[http://infodump.thefifthimperium.com/series/Starfire/ here]] (the black text on that page is an expandable link container). Weber later teamed up with Steve White to write '''novels''' set in the ''Starfire'' universe, of which 6 have been published so far:

to:

Of particular interest is the fact that DavidWeber, Creator/DavidWeber, author of the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series of SF novels, became a contributor to the game starting with the ''Starfire III: Empires'' supplement of the 1st Edition. Some of Weber's online comments about the game, and his involvement with it, can be found [[http://infodump.thefifthimperium.com/series/Starfire/ here]] (the black text on that page is an expandable link container). Weber later teamed up with Steve White to write '''novels''' set in the ''Starfire'' universe, of which 6 have been published so far:


* StrategyVersusTactics: There are two types of drives: military drives, which are very powerful and take up a small hull volume but must be periodically shut down for maintenance, and commercial drives, which are bulkier and slower but are actually faster over long distances due to their greater endurance. Most warships accept no substitutes for military drives; however, the [[BugWar Bugs]] use commercial drives for their fleets, making their ships less capable and survivable but allowing them to more easily gather and deploy the crushingly huge attritional fleets they favor.



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Not to be confused with the DCComics character. (For that, see the ''ComicBook/TeenTitans''.) Also bears no relation to the 1980 coin-op ArcadeGame ''[[http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=9758 Star Fire]]'', or to the rocket-armed [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-94_Starfire F-94C]], or to the nuclear fusion process that powers actual stars.

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Not to be confused with the DCComics character. (For that, see the ''ComicBook/TeenTitans''.) Also bears no relation to the 1980 coin-op ArcadeGame UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame ''[[http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=9758 Star Fire]]'', or to the rocket-armed [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-94_Starfire F-94C]], or to the nuclear fusion process that powers actual stars.


** The introduction of the SpaceFighter and fighter carrier in ''Starfire II'' was inspired by the original 1970s ''[[Series/BattlestarGalacticaClassic Battlestar Galactica]]''. The 1st Edition rules example for a squadron control sheet even used the name "Blue Squadron."

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** The introduction of the SpaceFighter and fighter carrier in ''Starfire II'' was inspired by the original 1970s ''[[Series/BattlestarGalacticaClassic Battlestar Galactica]]''.''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|1978}}''. The 1st Edition rules example for a squadron control sheet even used the name "Blue Squadron."

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