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* GarnishingTheStory: Seriously, what ''do'' dragons have to do with tic-tac-toe?



* InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons: Seriously, what ''do'' dragons have to do with tic-tac-toe?


* Auction: The "Auction" category had questions with many correct answers to them. When this category was played, the players then bid against each other to see who thought they could get more correct answers. This went on until a player challenged the opponent to complete the bid, or a bid to get ALL the correct answers was given. The winning player then had to give those correct answers bid to win the box, but a wrong answer at any time meant the opponent needed only one of the remaining correct answers to win the box (if the opponent also gave a wrong answer, the box went unclaimed).

to:

* Auction: {{Auction}}: The "Auction" category had questions with many correct answers to them. When this category was played, the players then bid against each other to see who thought they could get more correct answers. This went on until a player challenged the opponent to complete the bid, or a bid to get ALL the correct answers was given. The winning player then had to give those correct answers bid to win the box, but a wrong answer at any time meant the opponent needed only one of the remaining correct answers to win the box (if the opponent also gave a wrong answer, the box went unclaimed).


* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Once while interviewing an elderly plant expert, Wink asked her, if he were a flower, how she would know he was a good specimen. She replied that she would need to examine his stem.

to:

%% * GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Once while interviewing an elderly plant expert, Wink asked her, if he were a flower, how she would know he was a good specimen. She replied that she would need GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to examine his stem.overwhelming and persistent misuse, GCPTR is on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are reading this in the future, please check the trope page to make sure your example fits the current definition.


*** Up to around midway through the syndicated version's first season, the categories would shuffle after both players have had one turn ("X" plays, "O" plays, shuffle). The episode after then-grand champion Brian Donovan was defeated, the rules changed to having the categories shuffle after each turn ("X" plays, shuffle, "O" plays, shuffle).

to:

*** Up to around midway through the syndicated version's first season, the categories would shuffle after both players have had one turn ("X" plays, "O" plays, shuffle).shuffle), as well as at the start of the game. The episode after then-grand champion Brian Donovan was defeated, the rules changed to having the categories shuffle after each turn ("X" plays, shuffle, "O" plays, shuffle).

Added DiffLines:

* Auction: The "Auction" category had questions with many correct answers to them. When this category was played, the players then bid against each other to see who thought they could get more correct answers. This went on until a player challenged the opponent to complete the bid, or a bid to get ALL the correct answers was given. The winning player then had to give those correct answers bid to win the box, but a wrong answer at any time meant the opponent needed only one of the remaining correct answers to win the box (if the opponent also gave a wrong answer, the box went unclaimed).

Added DiffLines:

** On the 1990 version: "In a moment, the game that intrigued a nation! In a moment, the game of strategy, knowledge, and fun! In a moment... ''Tic-Tac-Dough''!!! And now, our host who will guide us through the next 30 minutes of ''Tic-Tac-Dough'', Patrick Wayne!"


*** On the syndicated version, the category and bonus game dollar value fonts were smaller; also, very early on $50 was an amount. Also during the first season, there were no red bonus/jump-in type categories.

to:

*** On the syndicated version, the category and bonus game dollar value fonts were smaller; also, very early on $50 was an amount. Also during the first season, there were no red bonus/jump-in type categories.categories (despite the presence of buzzers on the contestant podiums, an artifact from the then-recent CBS run).


September 10, 1990, saw the debut of another syndicated revival, this time hosted by Patrick Wayne (Creator/JohnWayne's son) and with ITC Entertainment replacing Colbert Television Sales as distributor. This iteration, featuring several changes that were roundly disliked, was canned on December 7 after just 13 weeks (although repeats aired through March 8, 1991).

to:

September 10, 1990, saw the debut of another syndicated revival, this time hosted by Patrick Wayne (Creator/JohnWayne's son) and with ITC Entertainment Creator/ITCEntertainment replacing Colbert Television Sales as distributor. This iteration, featuring several changes that were roundly disliked, was canned on December 7 after just 13 weeks (although repeats aired through March 8, 1991).


!!GameShowTropes in use:

to:

!!GameShowTropes !!This show provides examples of:
* TheAnnouncer: The 1950's run had Bill Wendell, followed by Bill [=McCord=] when Wendell became host, with occasional substitutions from Johnny Olson on the nighttime version. The 1978-86 era had Jay Stewart, followed by Charlie O'Donnell when Stewart left
in use:1981 following the death of his daughter, Jamie; substitutes included Johnny Gilbert, Mike Darrow, Bob Hilton and Art James. Larry Van Nuys announced the 1990's version.



* BlandNameProduct: The second-edition Transogram HomeGame was re-released in 1960 as ''3-in-a-Row Home Quiz'', with no references to the show whatsoever.



* CatchPhrase:
** Patrick Wayne's "YOU WINNNNNNNNNN!"
** Also from Wayne's version: "Tic Tac is back!"
** "You find the Tic and the Tac, and you get the Dough."
* ComplexityAddiction: The influx of red categories, to the point where three were on the board per game by the end of the sixth season. This likely had an impact on Caldwell's hosting style after Wink left at the end of Season 7.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
** '''1950s version''':
*** The winner of each game on the 1950s version had to decide whether to leave the show with all winnings intact or face a new opponent. If the champion was defeated, the opponent's winnings were deducted from their total.
** '''1970s version''':
*** Up to around midway through the syndicated version's first season, the categories would shuffle after both players have had one turn ("X" plays, "O" plays, shuffle). The episode after then-grand champion Brian Donovan was defeated, the rules changed to having the categories shuffle after each turn ("X" plays, shuffle, "O" plays, shuffle).
*** The entire CBS run could be counted as such, given the bonus game's rules (simply find the hidden tic-tac-toe before finding the dragon) and the prevalence of black-boxed categories where either contestant could "jump in" and claim the box with a correct answer. As such, two full games and two bonus rounds were played per episode.
*** On the syndicated version, the category and bonus game dollar value fonts were smaller; also, very early on $50 was an amount. Also during the first season, there were no red bonus/jump-in type categories.



* GameShowHost: Creator/JackBarry, Gene Rayburn and Bill Wendell hosted the 1950's daytime version, with Jay Jackson and Win Elliott hosting the concurrent nighttime version with, again, Johnny Olson as occasional substitute. Wink Martindale hosted from 1978-85, being replaced by Jim Caldwell for the final season. Patrick Wayne hosted the 1990's version.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Once while interviewing an elderly plant expert, Wink asked her, if he were a flower, how she would know he was a good specimen. She replied that she would need to examine his stem.
* TheHilarityOfHats:
** It became a bit of a RunningGag that Wink would don different goofy-looking hats for the sign-off at the end of the show. Also, every Friday was known as "Hat Day".
** Audience members could win a baseball cap decorated with the dragon's face in a follow-up game after the BonusRound.



* Personnel:
** TheAnnouncer: The 1950's run had Bill Wendell, followed by Bill [=McCord=] when Wendell became host, with occasional substitutions from Johnny Olson on the nighttime version. The 1978-86 era had Jay Stewart, followed by Charlie O'Donnell when Stewart left in 1981 following the death of his daughter, Jamie; substitutes included Johnny Gilbert, Mike Darrow, Bob Hilton and Art James. Larry Van Nuys announced the 1990's version.
** GameShowHost: Creator/JackBarry, Gene Rayburn and Bill Wendell hosted the 1950's daytime version, with Jay Jackson and Win Elliott hosting the concurrent nighttime version with, again, Johnny Olson as occasional substitute. Wink Martindale hosted from 1978-85, being replaced by Jim Caldwell for the final season. Patrick Wayne hosted the 1990's version.
** StudioAudience: A few people would come down to play "Dragon Finder" around 1983.

to:

* Personnel:
** TheAnnouncer: The 1950's run had Bill Wendell, followed by Bill [=McCord=] when Wendell became host,
InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons: Seriously, what ''do'' dragons have to do with occasional substitutions from Johnny Olson tic-tac-toe?
* LuckBasedMission: Barry-Enright loved to do this in the bonus round.
** In the CBS version, this was "Find three-in-a-row to win while avoiding the Dragon".
** In the 1978-86 syndicated run, it changed to picking squares to reach or exceed $1,000 or finding the words "Tic" and "Tac", but avoiding the Dragon.
** The 1990 one was similar to the CBS version, but the contestant picked X ''or'' O as their "designated symbol". One string of three-in-a-row symbols was placed
on the board, and it wasn't always possible with the chosen symbol to win the prize package. If the Dragonslayer was found, the contestant won the prizes and double the pot.
* MightyRoar: The 1978-86 Dragon had one.
* NegatedMomentOfAwesome: April 3, 1958 (nighttime), the circulating Jay Jackson episode. Both contestants keep getting questions right to cause tie games and build the pot to about $25,000...or it ''would'' be, had about 75% of
the nighttime version. series not been rigged. (Only one question is not answered correctly in the entire half-hour, but only because the contestant [[BlatantLies claimed someone in the audience had shouted out an answer]] a claim that Jackson quickly backs up, [[SureLetsGoWithThat saying he heard it as well]].[[note]] Specifically, the question sought the identity of the "Iron Man of Baseball" whose death in 1941 "shocked the nation". The 1978-86 era had correct answer: Lou Gehrig.[[/note]])
* NoIndoorVoice: Patrick Wayne. "YOU WIIIIIIIIIIN!!!"
* OpeningNarration: See above; on the CBS episodes,
Jay Stewart, followed by Charlie O'Donnell when Stewart left in 1981 following added the death of his daughter, Jamie; substitutes included Johnny Gilbert, Mike Darrow, Bob Hilton "From Television City in Hollywood" spiel.
* {{Pilot}}: Taped in February 1978, it had different podiums (X's
and Art James. Larry Van Nuys announced O's all over the 1990's version.
** GameShowHost: Creator/JackBarry, Gene Rayburn and Bill Wendell hosted the 1950's daytime version, with Jay Jackson and Win Elliott hosting the concurrent nighttime version with, again, Johnny Olson as occasional substitute. Wink Martindale hosted from 1978-85, being replaced by Jim Caldwell
front for the final season. Patrick Wayne hosted contestants and colors, instead of nameplates, plus eggcrate displays for the 1990's version.
** StudioAudience: A few people
contestant's winnings), different microphones, a rectangular pot readout atop the gameboard (likely changed to its more familiar arch shape to be more easily visible), printed X's and O's as the background behind the contestants, and a printed TTD logo behind Wink; in the series both were popped out. Pictures of the pilot set were used in early publicity shots and ''TV Guide'' ads for the show, and on the box of the 1978 home game.
* PungeonMaster: Wink loved his puns, and memorably subjected contestant Dan Klock to a HurricaneOfPuns (saying his job was very "timely", joking that Dan might get "ticked off" by all the puns, so Wink should "watch" what he
would come down say, etc.) The hurricane ended with "It's time to play "Dragon Finder" around 1983.''Tick-Tock-Dough''."
* SuddenlyShouting: Wayne tended to read the rules and questions in a monotone before jumping in with his "YOU BLOCK/WIN!"



* TopTenList: One of the special categories was called "Top Ten" which dealt with these. The contestant who gave the higher answer won the symbol on the board. It was renamed "Top This" when Jim Caldwell took over.
* TotallyRadical: About six weeks into the 1990 run, the BonusRound began having the Dragon and Dragonslayer ''rap their purpose'' instead of Wayne describing them himself. A couple of egregious examples:
-->'''Dragon:''' "Tic or Tac... Tac or Dough... pick the dragon square and you'll be po'."
-->'''Dragonslayer:''' "Think hard, think smart, think wise! Pick the dragonslayer and win your prize!"
* TransatlanticEquivalent: Several, although none in the same decades as the Martindale/Caldwell era (i.e., the show's peak).
** The United Kingdom got ''[[http://ukgameshows.com/ukgs/Criss_Cross_Quiz Criss-Cross-Quiz]]'', which ran from 1957 to 1967 on Creator/{{ITV}}. Jeremy Hawk helmed until 1962, when he was replaced by Barbara Kelly. A children's version without cash, called ''Junior Criss Cross Quiz'', aired alongside the parent show from 13 November 1957 to 29 June 1967. Hawk was the original host, followed by a string of what appear to be guest presenters (including [[Series/{{Blockbusters}} Bob Holness]]) until Kelly took over.
** Germany got ''Tick-Tack-Quiz'' on ARD, hosted by Fritz Benscher and running weekly from 1958 to 1967. It returned on RTL Plus in 1992 as ''Tic-Tac-Toe'', now a Reg Grundy-produced daily version with host Michael "Goofy" Förster, which was based on the 1990 format.
** Australia had a Reg Grundy adaptation, simply called ''Tic-Tac-Dough'', on the Creator/NineNetwork from 1960 to 1964 with Chuck Faulkner hosting.



----
!!This show provides examples of:
* BlandNameProduct: The second-edition Transogram HomeGame was re-released in 1960 as ''3-in-a-Row Home Quiz'', with no references to the show whatsoever.
* CatchPhrase:
** Patrick Wayne's "YOU WINNNNNNNNNN!"
** Also from Wayne's version: "Tic Tac is back!"
** "You find the Tic and the Tac, and you get the Dough."
* ComplexityAddiction: The influx of red categories, to the point where three were on the board per game by the end of the sixth season. This likely had an impact on Caldwell's hosting style after Wink left at the end of Season 7.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
** '''1950s version''':
*** The winner of each game on the 1950s version had to decide whether to leave the show with all winnings intact or face a new opponent. If the champion was defeated, the opponent's winnings were deducted from their total.
** '''1970s version''':
*** Up to around midway through the syndicated version's first season, the categories would shuffle after both players have had one turn ("X" plays, "O" plays, shuffle). The episode after then-grand champion Brian Donovan was defeated, the rules changed to having the categories shuffle after each turn ("X" plays, shuffle, "O" plays, shuffle).
*** The entire CBS run could be counted as such, given the bonus game's rules (simply find the hidden tic-tac-toe before finding the dragon) and the prevalence of black-boxed categories where either contestant could "jump in" and claim the box with a correct answer. As such, two full games and two bonus rounds were played per episode.
*** On the syndicated version, the category and bonus game dollar value fonts were smaller; also, very early on $50 was an amount. Also during the first season, there were no red bonus/jump-in type categories.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Once while interviewing an elderly plant expert, Wink asked her, if he were a flower, how she would know he was a good specimen. She replied that she would need to examine his stem.
* TheHilarityOfHats:
** It became a bit of a RunningGag that Wink would don different goofy-looking hats for the sign-off at the end of the show. Also, every Friday was known as "Hat Day".
** Audience members could win a baseball cap decorated with the dragon's face in a follow-up game after the BonusRound.
* InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons: Seriously, what ''do'' dragons have to do with tic-tac-toe?
* LuckBasedMission: Barry-Enright loved to do this in the bonus round.
** In the CBS version, this was "Find three-in-a-row to win while avoiding the Dragon".
** In the 1978-86 syndicated run, it changed to picking squares to reach or exceed $1,000 or finding the words "Tic" and "Tac", but avoiding the Dragon.
** The 1990 one was similar to the CBS version, but the contestant picked X ''or'' O as their "designated symbol". One string of three-in-a-row symbols was placed on the board, and it wasn't always possible with the chosen symbol to win the prize package. If the Dragonslayer was found, the contestant won the prizes and double the pot.
* MightyRoar: The 1978-86 Dragon had one.
* NegatedMomentOfAwesome: April 3, 1958 (nighttime), the circulating Jay Jackson episode. Both contestants keep getting questions right to cause tie games and build the pot to about $25,000...or it ''would'' be, had about 75% of the nighttime series not been rigged. (Only one question is not answered correctly in the entire half-hour, but only because the contestant [[BlatantLies claimed someone in the audience had shouted out an answer]] a claim that Jackson quickly backs up, [[SureLetsGoWithThat saying he heard it as well]].[[note]] Specifically, the question sought the identity of the "Iron Man of Baseball" whose death in 1941 "shocked the nation". The correct answer: Lou Gehrig.[[/note]])
* NoIndoorVoice: Patrick Wayne. "YOU WIIIIIIIIIIN!!!"
* OpeningNarration: See above; on the CBS episodes, Jay Stewart added the "From Television City in Hollywood" spiel.
* {{Pilot}}: Taped in February 1978, it had different podiums (X's and O's all over the front for the contestants and colors, instead of nameplates, plus eggcrate displays for the contestant's winnings), different microphones, a rectangular pot readout atop the gameboard (likely changed to its more familiar arch shape to be more easily visible), printed X's and O's as the background behind the contestants, and a printed TTD logo behind Wink; in the series both were popped out. Pictures of the pilot set were used in early publicity shots and ''TV Guide'' ads for the show, and on the box of the 1978 home game.
* PungeonMaster: Wink loved his puns, and memorably subjected contestant Dan Klock to a HurricaneOfPuns (saying his job was very "timely", joking that Dan might get "ticked off" by all the puns, so Wink should "watch" what he would say, etc.) The hurricane ended with "It's time to play ''Tick-Tock-Dough''."
* SuddenlyShouting: Wayne tended to read the rules and questions in a monotone before jumping in with his "YOU BLOCK/WIN!"
* TopTenList: One of the special categories was called "Top Ten" which dealt with these. The contestant who gave the higher answer won the symbol on the board. It was renamed "Top This" when Jim Caldwell took over.
* TotallyRadical: About six weeks into the 1990 run, the BonusRound began having the Dragon and Dragonslayer ''rap their purpose'' instead of Wayne describing them himself. A couple of egregious examples:
-->'''Dragon:''' "Tic or Tac... Tac or Dough... pick the dragon square and you'll be po'."
-->'''Dragonslayer:''' "Think hard, think smart, think wise! Pick the dragonslayer and win your prize!"
* TransatlanticEquivalent: Several, although none in the same decades as the Martindale/Caldwell era (i.e., the show's peak).
** The United Kingdom got ''[[http://ukgameshows.com/ukgs/Criss_Cross_Quiz Criss-Cross-Quiz]]'', which ran from 1957 to 1967 on Creator/{{ITV}}. Jeremy Hawk helmed until 1962, when he was replaced by Barbara Kelly. A children's version without cash, called ''Junior Criss Cross Quiz'', aired alongside the parent show from 13 November 1957 to 29 June 1967. Hawk was the original host, followed by a string of what appear to be guest presenters (including [[Series/{{Blockbusters}} Bob Holness]]) until Kelly took over.
** Germany got ''Tick-Tack-Quiz'' on ARD, hosted by Fritz Benscher and running weekly from 1958 to 1967. It returned on RTL Plus in 1992 as ''Tic-Tac-Toe'', now a Reg Grundy-produced daily version with host Michael "Goofy" Förster, which was based on the 1990 format.
** Australia had a Reg Grundy adaptation, simply called ''Tic-Tac-Dough'', on the Creator/NineNetwork from 1960 to 1964 with Chuck Faulkner hosting.


->''From Television City in Hollywood, it's everybody's game of strategy, knowledge and fun! It's '''Tic-Tac-Dough'''!''

to:

->''From Television City in Hollywood, it's everybody's game of strategy, knowledge and fun! It's '''Tic-Tac-Dough'''!''


* {{Blooper}}:
** At the start of one 1982 episode, Martindale refers to the champion as a "lady", but realizes his mistake after the champion, architect Bill Peters, is introduced.

Added DiffLines:

* {{Blooper}}:
** At the start of one 1982 episode, Martindale refers to the champion as a "lady", but realizes his mistake after the champion, architect Bill Peters, is introduced.

Added DiffLines:

* ComplexityAddiction: The influx of red categories, to the point where three were on the board per game by the end of the sixth season. This likely had an impact on Caldwell's hosting style after Wink left at the end of Season 7.



to:

-->--OpeningNarration


** The Republic of Transmania also had a version produced by CTRS Entertainment based on the 1978 U.S. version, the show was hosted by news anchor Nicholas Segers in which broadcast on ATN Daytime between 1979 until 1980 and Transmanian disc jockey Andrew Cunningham (who worked as a producer and consultant of other Barry & Enright shows as uncredited) took over as host in which the show premiered on ATN Primetime in October 1980 until 1982. It was returned as a new series on TBN premiering on September 19, 1983, until and ended in late 1988.

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