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Added DiffLines:

** As mentioned elsewhere, Richard II's death very explicitly mirrors Catholic iconography of St. Sebastian--who, in addition to being a Christian saint and martyr, has long been considered a symbol of gay desire. Richard, too, is depicted as gay, and as a sort of religious martyr in his own way (he still espouses the divine right of kings, as contrasted with Bolingbroke's more pragmatic, and modern, political outlook).


* CharacterizationMarchesOn: Probably InUniverse, even. As we saw domestic life in the House of York, Duchess Cecily and her son Richard are nothing if a normal mother-and-son, Cecily even warmly handing Richard his cloak as he rides a horse. The brutality of war and loss (as well as Richard's complicity in most of them) probably embittered both of them against each other, such that when they finally confront each other at the tail-end of ''Theatre/RichardIII'', they can do nothing but snark and throw curses at each other.

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* CharacterizationMarchesOn: Probably InUniverse, even. As we saw domestic life in the House of York, Duchess Cecily and her son Richard are nothing if not a normal mother-and-son, mother and son, Cecily even warmly handing Richard his cloak as he rides a horse. The brutality of war and loss (as well as Richard's complicity in most of them) probably embittered both of them against each other, such that when they finally confront each other at the tail-end of ''Theatre/RichardIII'', they can do nothing but snark and throw curses at each other.other.
** Bolingbroke/Henry IV undergoes a pretty substantial character shift between ''Richard II'' and the ''Henry IV'' plays, which can’t be entirely accounted for by the change of actors from Rory Kinnear to (the very dissimilar looking) Jeremy Irons. Whereas Kinnear’s Bolingbroke is depicted as a [[TheQuietOne quiet soldier type]] whose unwillingness to mince words contrasts sharply with Richard II’s [[LargeHam constant speechmaking]], Irons’ Henry IV is much more outspoken and emotive and prone to long soliloquies about the cares of kingship. Some of this could be chalked up to the changes brought about by the crown (which is an ongoing theme of the series), but between the visible aging and the personality shift it’s easy to forget that this is supposed to be the same man just ''10 years'' after the events of the first installment.


''The Hollow Crown'', created by Creator/TheBBC as a part of the "Cultural Olympics" in 2012, is a mini-series based on the ''Henriad'' or ''Major Tetralogy'', the quartet of Shakespeare's plays ''Theatre/RichardII'', ''Theatre/HenryIV [[Theatre/HenryIVPart1 Part 1]] and [[Theatre/HenryIVPart2 Part 2]]'', and ''Theatre/HenryV''. It features fairly lavish production values, and an all-star cast, headlined by Creator/BenWhishaw (Richard II), Creator/RoryKinnear (Henry Bolingbroke/Young Henry IV), Creator/PatrickStewart (John of Gaunt), Creator/JeremyIrons (Henry IV), Creator/TomHiddleston (Henry V), Simon Russell Beale (Falstaff), and Creator/JohnHurt (Chorus in ''Theatre/HenryV'').

A second season, covering the ''Minor Tetralogy'' (the ''Theatre/HenryVI'' plays and ''Theatre/RichardIII'') subtitled ''The Wars of the Roses'' aired in 2016. The episodes were primarily headlined by Hugh Bonneville (Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester), Creator/SophieOkonedo (Margaret of Anjou), Tom Sturridge (King Henry VI), Creator/BenedictCumberbatch (Richard of Gloucester/

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''The Hollow Crown'', created by Creator/TheBBC as a part of the "Cultural Olympics" in 2012, is a mini-series based on the ''Henriad'' or ''Major Tetralogy'', the quartet of Shakespeare's plays ''Theatre/RichardII'', ''Theatre/HenryIV [[Theatre/HenryIVPart1 Part 1]] and [[Theatre/HenryIVPart2 Part 2]]'', and ''Theatre/HenryV''. It features fairly lavish production values, and an all-star cast, headlined by Creator/BenWhishaw (Richard II), Creator/RoryKinnear (Henry Bolingbroke/Young Henry IV), Creator/PatrickStewart (John of Gaunt), Creator/DavidSuchet (Edmund, Duke of York), Creator/JeremyIrons (Henry IV), Creator/TomHiddleston (Henry V), Simon Russell Beale (Falstaff), and Creator/JohnHurt (Chorus in ''Theatre/HenryV'').

A second season, covering the ''Minor Tetralogy'' (the ''Theatre/HenryVI'' plays and ''Theatre/RichardIII'') subtitled ''The Wars of the Roses'' aired in 2016. The episodes were primarily headlined by Hugh Bonneville (Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester), Creator/SophieOkonedo (Margaret of Anjou), Tom Sturridge (King Henry VI), Creator/KeeleyHawes (Queen Elizabeth Woodville), Creator/BenedictCumberbatch (Richard of Gloucester/


* ArtifactOfDoom: The series's name comes from a speech where Richard II laments how the crown is an ArtifactOfDoom, bringing despair and sorrow to all those who wear it. Ergo, the choice of name and the fact the series keeps the same crown for Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V and Henry VI (coupled with the greater part of Shakespeare's monologues on the illusory nature of power are delivered whilst holding said crown) gives a non-supernatural sense of this trope to the Crown: all those who wear it, die.

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* AllForNothing: The final fate of Richard III is a harsh DownerEnding to the once good-intentioned ideals of the Yorkist regal claim--all facilitated by Richard's cunning and murders (and also likely products of his damaged and conniving psyche). Had Richard not been as suspicious and self-centred by the end, he might have been able to keep his crown and strengthen the Yorkist claim to the throne. Instead he destroys his bloodline and [[DyingAlone dies alone in the battlefield]].
* ArtifactOfDoom: The series's name comes from a speech where Richard II laments how the crown is an ArtifactOfDoom, a particularly-inescapable one, bringing despair and sorrow to all those who wear it. Ergo, the choice of name and the fact the series keeps the same crown for Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V and Henry VI (coupled with the greater part of Shakespeare's monologues on the illusory nature of power are delivered whilst holding said crown) gives a non-supernatural sense of this trope to the Crown: all those who wear it, die.



* BittersweetEnding: While in most cases the death of Richard III at Bosworth is presented as a glorious happy ending on stage, ''The Hollow Crown'' takes it as another sad, tiring event akin to the victories in ''Henry V''--[[WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife with the loss of life overwhelming any potential victory that have been achieved]]. The coronation of Henry VII becomes more poignant and somber after it was immediately followed by the mass graves at Bosworth,The final fate of Richard of Gloucester,who became Richard III though cunning and murder,despite how obviously damaged and conniving he was, it is sad end because had he not given in to darkness,he might have been able to keep his crown and restore his family's claim to the throne,instead he destroys his bloodline and dies alone in the battlefield.

to:

* BittersweetEnding: While in most cases the death of Richard III at Bosworth is presented as a glorious happy ending on stage, ''The Hollow Crown'' takes it as another sad, tiring event akin to the victories in ''Henry V''--[[WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife with the loss of life overwhelming any potential victory that have been achieved]]. The coronation of Henry VII becomes more poignant and somber after it was immediately followed by the mass graves at Bosworth,The final fate of Richard of Gloucester,who became Richard III though cunning and murder,despite how obviously damaged and conniving he was, it is sad end because had he not given in to darkness,he might have been able to keep his crown and restore his family's claim to the throne,instead he destroys his bloodline and dies alone in the battlefield.Bosworth.


Added DiffLines:

** And then there's Richard III's iconic one: ''"A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!"'' Made more notable in that [[VillainousBreakdown he goes down screaming, slipping in the rain- and blood-soaked mud]], yet [[DefiantToTheEnd still raring for a fight]].


* HypercompetentSidekick: Richard of York to his brother Edward. It's part of what sours Richard on his York brothers. He has to pull all the family's weight after their father's death whilst his brothers bicker.

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* HypercompetentSidekick: Richard of York Gloucester to his brother Edward. Edward IV. It's part of what sours Richard on his York older brothers. He has to pull all the family's weight of the family after their father's death whilst his brothers bicker. death, while Edward IV and the middle brother George Duke of Clarence waste their time bickering with each other.



** Richard III's angsting about how deformed and undesirable he is ([[http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/05/15/00/342B67C800000578-3590907-image-m-81_1463268293492.jpg despite being true on-screen]]) might ring hollow considering he's still freaking Creator/BenedictCumberbatch.

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** Richard III's angsting about how deformed and undesirable he is ([[http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/05/15/00/342B67C800000578-3590907-image-m-81_1463268293492.jpg despite being true on-screen]]) might ring still rings hollow considering he's still freaking Creator/BenedictCumberbatch.


* BittersweetEnding: While in most cases the death of Richard III at Bosworth is presented as a glorious happy ending on stage, ''The Hollow Crown'' takes it as another sad, tiring event akin to the victories in ''Henry V''--[[WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife with the loss of life overwhelming any potential victory that have been achieved]]. The coronation of Henry VII becomes more poignant and somber after it was immediately followed by the mass graves at Bosworth,The final fate of Richard of Gloucester,who became Richard III though cunning and murder,despite how he was obviously damaged and conniving he was, it is sad end because had he not given in to darkness,he might have been able to keep his crown and restore his family's claim to the throne,instead he destroys his bloodline and dies alone in the battlefield.

to:

* BittersweetEnding: While in most cases the death of Richard III at Bosworth is presented as a glorious happy ending on stage, ''The Hollow Crown'' takes it as another sad, tiring event akin to the victories in ''Henry V''--[[WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife with the loss of life overwhelming any potential victory that have been achieved]]. The coronation of Henry VII becomes more poignant and somber after it was immediately followed by the mass graves at Bosworth,The final fate of Richard of Gloucester,who became Richard III though cunning and murder,despite how he was obviously obviously damaged and conniving he was, it is sad end because had he not given in to darkness,he might have been able to keep his crown and restore his family's claim to the throne,instead he destroys his bloodline and dies alone in the battlefield.


* BittersweetEnding: While in most cases the death of Richard III at Bosworth is presented as a glorious happy ending on stage, ''The Hollow Crown'' takes it as another sad, tiring event akin to the victories in ''Henry V''--[[WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife with the loss of life overwhelming any potential victory that have been achieved]]. The coronation of Henry VII becomes more poignant and somber after it was immediately followed by the mass graves at Bosworth.

to:

* BittersweetEnding: While in most cases the death of Richard III at Bosworth is presented as a glorious happy ending on stage, ''The Hollow Crown'' takes it as another sad, tiring event akin to the victories in ''Henry V''--[[WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife with the loss of life overwhelming any potential victory that have been achieved]]. The coronation of Henry VII becomes more poignant and somber after it was immediately followed by the mass graves at Bosworth.Bosworth,The final fate of Richard of Gloucester,who became Richard III though cunning and murder,despite how he was obviously damaged and conniving he was, it is sad end because had he not given in to darkness,he might have been able to keep his crown and restore his family's claim to the throne,instead he destroys his bloodline and dies alone in the battlefield.

Added DiffLines:

* CastingGag: Andrew Scott plays French King Louis in the second season, meaning he is the counterpart to Benedict Cumberbatch's eventual King Richard III. Both, of course, played Moriarty and Sherlock Holmes in [[{{Series/Sherlock}} the BBC series]].


* ShirtlessScene: Richard II ends up wearing nothing but a loincloth for the final act. In ''Henry IV,'' there's one for Hal and Poins and two towels. Finally, Henry VI becomes the medieval version of a hobo wearing nothing but a loincloth too.

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* ShirtlessScene: ShirtlessScene:
**
Richard II ends up wearing nothing but a loincloth for the final act. act.
**
In ''Henry IV,'' there's one for Hal and Poins and two towels. Finally, towels.
**
Henry VI becomes the medieval version of a hobo wearing nothing but a loincloth too.too.
** Finally, Richard III (with his [[SarcasmMode glorious]], [[BodyHorror exaggerated humpback and scoliosis]] [[FanDisservice in full view]]) begins his "Winter of Discontent" soliloquy this way.


* InformedDeformity / HistoricalBeautyUpdate: Henry V goes out of his way to apologize to Catherine for his looks, and in real life he had facial scars from an earlier battle. In this production, Creator/TomHiddleston [[http://www.britishmuseum.org/images/event_hiddleston_henry_V_304x384.jpg looks like this]].

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* InformedDeformity / HistoricalBeautyUpdate: HistoricalBeautyUpdate:
**
Henry V goes out of his way to apologize to Catherine for his looks, and in real life he had facial scars from an earlier battle. In this production, Creator/TomHiddleston [[http://www.britishmuseum.org/images/event_hiddleston_henry_V_304x384.jpg looks like this]].


-->''Let’s talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs,''
-->''Make dust our paper, and with rainy eyes''
-->''Write sorrow on the bosom of the earth. ...''
-->''[L]et us sit upon the ground''
-->''And tell sad stories of the death of kings—''
-->''How some have been deposed, some slain in war,''
-->''Some haunted by the ghosts they have deposed,''
-->''Some poisoned by their wives, some sleeping killed,''
-->''All murdered.''

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-->''Let’s ->''"Let’s talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs,''
-->''Make
epitaphs,\\
Make
dust our paper, and with rainy eyes''
-->''Write
eyes\\
Write
sorrow on the bosom of the earth. ...''
-->''[L]et
\\
[L]et
us sit upon the ground''
-->''And
ground\\
And
tell sad stories of the death of kings—''
-->''How
kings—\\
How
some have been deposed, some slain in war,''
-->''Some
war,\\
Some
haunted by the ghosts they have deposed,''
-->''Some
deposed,\\
Some
poisoned by their wives, some sleeping killed,''
-->''All
killed,\\
All
murdered.''"''



-->''The heavens themselves, the planets, and this Earth''
-->''Observe degree, priority, and place...''
-->''Office, and custom, in all line of order. ...''
-->''Take but degree away, untune that string,''
-->''And hark what discord follows.''
-->— ''Theatre/TroilusAndCressida'' I.3.89-90, 92, 113-114 (the OpeningNarration of the 2016 series by Creator/JudiDench)

to:

-->''The ->''"The heavens themselves, the planets, and this Earth''
-->''Observe
Earth\\
Observe
degree, priority, and place...''
-->''Office,
\\
Office,
and custom, in all line of order. ...''
-->''Take
\\
Take
but degree away, untune that string,''
-->''And
string,\\
And
hark what discord follows.''
-->—
"''
-->--
''Theatre/TroilusAndCressida'' I.3.89-90, 92, 113-114 (the OpeningNarration of the 2016 series by Creator/JudiDench)



--> Thus yields the cedar to the axe’s edge...
--> Lo, now my glory smeared in dust and blood!...
--> Why, what is pomp, rule, reign, but earth and dust?
--> And live we how we can, yet die we must.
--> -- ''Henry VI Part 3'', V.2.11, 24, 28, 29.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: Near the beginning of ''RichardII'', Richard watches a model posing for a painting of St. Sebastian. [[HumanPincushion Guess what happens to him at the end?]] The very opening scene of ''RichardII'' also foreshadows the layout of how the entire affair will end (see the [[TearJerker/RichardII Tear Jerker]] section for details).

to:

--> Thus --->Thus yields the cedar to the axe’s edge...
-->
edge...\\
Lo, now my glory smeared in dust and blood!...
-->
blood!...\\
Why, what is pomp, rule, reign, but earth and dust?
-->
dust?\\
And live we how we can, yet die we must.
--> -- ---->-- ''Henry VI Part 3'', V.2.11, 24, 28, 29.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: Near the beginning of ''RichardII'', ''Theatre/RichardII'', Richard watches a model posing for a painting of St. Sebastian. [[HumanPincushion Guess what happens to him at the end?]] The very opening scene of ''RichardII'' ''Richard II'' also foreshadows the layout of how the entire affair will end (see the [[TearJerker/RichardII Tear Jerker]] section for details).



* FuroScene: ''A five and a half minute'' FuroScene with Tom Hiddleston and Creator/DavidDawson. Nothing sexual happens, be assured, but it'll be hard to ignore for viewers of both genders.

to:

* FuroScene: ''A five and a half minute'' FuroScene Furo Scene with Tom Hiddleston Creator/TomHiddleston and Creator/DavidDawson. Nothing sexual happens, be assured, but it'll be hard to ignore for viewers of both genders.



I prophesied France will be lost ere long!''\\
-- ''Henry VI Part 2'' I.1.152-153.

to:

I prophesied France will be lost ere long!''\\
--
long!''
---->--
''Henry VI Part 2'' I.1.152-153.



'''Richard:''' ''[wipes the spit and then licks his fingers]'' Never came poison from so sweet a place.\\
-- ''Theatre/RichardIII'', I.2.148-160.

to:

'''Richard:''' ''[wipes the spit and then licks his fingers]'' Never came poison from so sweet a place.\\
--
place.
--->--
''Theatre/RichardIII'', I.2.148-160.



* OutOfFocus: Very little screentime is accorded to John Talbot, despite being supposedly one of the bigger tragic characters of ''HenryVIPart1''--which translates to more focus on this production's central character, Humphrey of Gloucester.

to:

* OutOfFocus: Very little screentime is accorded to John Talbot, despite being supposedly one of the bigger tragic characters of ''HenryVIPart1''--which ''Theatre/HenryVIPart1'' -- which translates to more focus on this production's central character, Humphrey of Gloucester.



* RememberTheNewGuy: You'd think you would have seen Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester in ''Theatre/HenryV'', being Henry V's brother and subsequent regent for his son, yet he only debuts in ''HenryVIPart1.'' In fact, Shakespeare's original play has him, but he was cut out in the 2012 series.

to:

* RememberTheNewGuy: You'd think you would have seen Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester in ''Theatre/HenryV'', being Henry V's brother and subsequent regent for his son, yet he only debuts in ''HenryVIPart1.''Theatre/HenryVIPart1.'' In fact, Shakespeare's original play has him, but he was cut out in the 2012 series.



--> ''For within '''the hollow crown'''''
--> ''That rounds the mortal temples of a king''
--> ''Keeps Death his court...''
* TokenMinority: In Richard II, the Bishop of Carlisle is black; though nobody seems to notice. It's kind of difficult to ignore it once he says the line "O forfend it God/ That in a Christian climate, souls refined/ Should show so heinous, '''''black''''', obscene a deed!"
** Also, in ''Henry V'', the Duke of York is black, despite being the same individual as the Aumerle of ''RichardII'', who's played by a white actor. (Few productions make the connection between the two characters, however.)

to:

--> ''For -->''For within '''the hollow crown'''''
-->
crown'''''\\
''That rounds the mortal temples of a king''
-->
king''\\
''Keeps Death his court...''
* TokenMinority: TokenMinority:
**
In Richard II, the Bishop of Carlisle is black; though nobody seems to notice. It's kind of difficult to ignore it once he says the line "O forfend it God/ That in a Christian climate, souls refined/ Should show so heinous, '''''black''''', obscene a deed!"
** Also, in ''Henry V'', the Duke of York is black, despite being the same individual as the Aumerle of ''RichardII'', ''Theatre/RichardII'', who's played by a white actor. (Few productions make the connection between the two characters, however.)


A second season, covering the ''Minor Tetralogy'' (the ''Theatre/HenryVI'' plays and ''Theatre/RichardIII'') subtitled ''The Wars of the Roses'' aired in 2016. The episodes were primarily headlined by Hugh Bonneville (Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester), Creator/SophieOkonedo (Margaret of Anjou), Tom Sturridge (King Henry VI), Creator/BenedictCumberbatch (King Richard III) and Creator/JudiDench (Cecily Neville, Duchess of York).

to:

A second season, covering the ''Minor Tetralogy'' (the ''Theatre/HenryVI'' plays and ''Theatre/RichardIII'') subtitled ''The Wars of the Roses'' aired in 2016. The episodes were primarily headlined by Hugh Bonneville (Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester), Creator/SophieOkonedo (Margaret of Anjou), Tom Sturridge (King Henry VI), Creator/BenedictCumberbatch (King (Richard of Gloucester/
Richard III) and Creator/JudiDench (Cecily Neville, Duchess of York).



** ''Henry VI Part 2'' shows how Richard, son of the Duke of York (the future Richard III), started out as an earnest (if slightly obsessed) young man, and how he gradually turned into the villain we see in his respective play; his home is destroyed, his younger brother and father are gruesomely killed in front of him, he constantly has to watch his older brothers screw up or betray each other while failing to properly avenge their family, and every setback causes him to lose more faith in just about everything. His hunched back and withered arm, and the subsequent taunting he gets because of them, don't help.

to:

** ''Henry VI Part 2'' shows how Richard, son of the Duke of York (the future Richard III), started out as an earnest (if slightly obsessed) young man, and how he gradually turned into the villain we see in his respective play; his home is destroyed, his father and younger brother and father are gruesomely killed in front of him, he constantly has to watch his older brothers screw up or betray each other while failing to properly avenge their family, and every setback causes him to lose more faith in just about everything. His hunched back and withered arm, and the subsequent taunting he gets because of them, don't help.


* LoveRuinsTheRealm: In ''Henry VI Part 2,'' Edward IV chooses to marry Elizabeth Woodville, a relatively low-born widow.[[note]]For those who would want this plot point explored better (even if historically-inaccurately), PhilippaGregory's Literature/TheCousinsWarSeries and its TV adaptation ''The White Queen'' may be useful.[[/note]] This infuriates Warwick, who was arranging Edward's marriage to a French princess, and he promptly switches sides to join forces with Margaret of Anjou. Even worse, it alienates Edward's brothers, who are disillusioned with both him and his decisions. George flat out rebels and joins Warwick (if only for a little while before he comes crawling back) while Richard bides his time and waits...

to:

* LoveRuinsTheRealm: In ''Henry VI Part 2,'' Edward IV chooses to marry Elizabeth Woodville, a relatively low-born widow.[[note]]For those who would want this plot point explored better (even if historically-inaccurately), PhilippaGregory's Literature/TheCousinsWarSeries Creator/PhilippaGregory's ''Literature/TheCousinsWarSeries'' and its TV adaptation ''The White Queen'' ''Series/TheWhiteQueen'' may be useful.[[/note]] This infuriates Warwick, who was arranging Edward's marriage to a French princess, and he promptly switches sides to join forces with Margaret of Anjou. Even worse, it alienates Edward's brothers, who are disillusioned with both him and his decisions. George flat out rebels and joins Warwick (if only for a little while before he comes crawling back) while Richard bides his time and waits...


* KubrickStare: Richard of Gloster, more and more as the parts of Henry VI drags on, and also in his eponymous play - ''by Jove'' is he good at it.

to:

* KubrickStare: Richard of Gloster, Gloucester, more and more as the parts of Henry VI drags on, and also in his eponymous play - ''by Jove'' is he good at it.


* KubrickStare: Richard of Gloster, more and more as the parts of Henry VI drags on, and also in his eponymous plays - ''by Jove'' is he good at it.

to:

* KubrickStare: Richard of Gloster, more and more as the parts of Henry VI drags on, and also in his eponymous plays play - ''by Jove'' is he good at it.

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