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* Music/{{Hooverphonic}} (Belgium, 2020)


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* Music/{{Hooverphonic}} (Belgium, 2020)

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* Music/{{Hooverphonic}} (Belgium, 2020)


* Montenegro in 2012 with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHnqF5PLP2w Euro Neuro]], sung by Rambo Amadeus, a self-confessed 'media manipulator'. It didn't make it to the final. The performance features [[EvilLaugh evil villain laughter]], a barrage of {{Painful Rhyme}}s pulled straight out of a dictionary and lyrics [[TakeThat making fun of the poor economical situation within the EU.]]

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* Montenegro in 2012 with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHnqF5PLP2w Euro Neuro]], sung by Rambo Amadeus, a self-confessed 'media manipulator'. It didn't make it to the final. The performance features [[EvilLaugh evil villain laughter]], a barrage of {{Painful Rhyme}}s forced rhymes pulled straight out of a dictionary and lyrics [[TakeThat making fun of the poor economical situation within the EU.]]


* IncestSubtext: Either this, or a case of self-inflicted IncestuousCasting, when Salvador Sobral and his sister (and songwriter) Luísa decided to perform the TriumphantReprise of the ultra-romantic song[[https://youtu.be/z5VUti3kVIo Amar Pelos Dois]]as a duet. Not helped by rumours that the song was Luísa's message to Salvador given his heart condition. They've had a penchant for [[https://youtu.be/19y9QjojEB8 singing]] [[https://youtu.be/Fm9g8GvtWSs romantic duets]]since.


There have been a handful of Eurovision spinoffs over the years, including Junior Eurovision, which runs every autumn, the short-lived Eurovision Dance Contest, and an Asian version of the contest that was set to debut in 2018, [[ScheduleSlip but didn't end up happening quite then]], and currently appears to be stuck in DevelopmentHell. During the 2019 edition in Tel Aviv, the EBU announced they had begun developing an American version —tentatively titled the American Song Contest— for a planned 2021 debut.

In March 2019, it was announced that Creator/WillFerrell's proposed ''Eurovision'' film, which he will co-write and star in, was officially moving forward at Creator/{{Netflix}}, with David Dobkin (''Film/WeddingCrashers'') tapped to direct. The plot of the film will involve two Icelandic siblings (Ferrell and Creator/RachelMcAdams) with aspirations to compete in the competition, with Creator/PierceBrosnan and Creator/DanStevens are also set to appear. Ferrell himself has been quite a fan of Eurovision for a while, claiming to have to watched every edition since 1999 when his (Swedish) wife introduced him to it, and he even attended the 2018 competition in Lisbon.

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There have been a handful of Eurovision spinoffs over the years, including Junior Eurovision, which runs every autumn, the short-lived Eurovision Dance Contest, and an Asian version of the contest that was set to debut in 2018, [[ScheduleSlip but didn't end up happening quite then]], and currently appears to be stuck in DevelopmentHell. During the 2019 edition in Tel Aviv, the EBU announced they had begun developing an American version —tentatively titled the American Song Contest— for a planned 2021 debut. \n\n Eurovision was first broadcast in the United States from 2016 to 2018 on the [[LGBTFanbase LGBT-focused]] cable network Creator/{{LOGO}}, before Creator/{{Netflix}} acquired the US streaming rights for the 2019 and 2020 editions, with an extended arrangement possible beyond that. [[note]]This doesn't include live streaming of the contest; both semi-finals and the final are added to the service after it has already aired in Europe[[/note]]

In March 2019, it was announced that Creator/WillFerrell's proposed ''Eurovision'' film, which he will co-write and star in, was officially moving forward at Creator/{{Netflix}}, Netflix [[note]]likely in conjunction with the aforementioned US streaming rights so that American audiences could watch the real thing after seeing the film[[/note]], with David Dobkin (''Film/WeddingCrashers'') tapped to direct. The plot of the film will involve two Icelandic siblings (Ferrell and Creator/RachelMcAdams) with aspirations who aspire to compete in the competition, with Creator/PierceBrosnan and Creator/DanStevens are also set to appear. Ferrell himself has been quite a fan of Eurovision for a while, claiming to have to watched every edition since 1999 when his (Swedish) wife introduced him to it, and he even attended the 2018 competition in Lisbon.


In March 2019, it was announced that Creator/WillFerrell's proposed ''Eurovision'' film, which he will co-write and star in, was officially moving forward at Creator/{{Netflix}}. Ferrell himself has been quite a fan of the contest for a while, claiming to have to watched every edition since 1999 when his (Swedish) wife introduced him to it, and he even attended the 2018 competition in Lisbon. David Dobkin (''Film/WeddingCrashers'') has been tapped to direct.

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In March 2019, it was announced that Creator/WillFerrell's proposed ''Eurovision'' film, which he will co-write and star in, was officially moving forward at Creator/{{Netflix}}. Creator/{{Netflix}}, with David Dobkin (''Film/WeddingCrashers'') tapped to direct. The plot of the film will involve two Icelandic siblings (Ferrell and Creator/RachelMcAdams) with aspirations to compete in the competition, with Creator/PierceBrosnan and Creator/DanStevens are also set to appear. Ferrell himself has been quite a fan of the contest Eurovision for a while, claiming to have to watched every edition since 1999 when his (Swedish) wife introduced him to it, and he even attended the 2018 competition in Lisbon. David Dobkin (''Film/WeddingCrashers'') has been tapped to direct.
Lisbon.


* Norway's 2019 entry was "Spirit in the Sky" by [=KEiiNO=], an upbeat, pro-equality song that is notable for being the first Eurovision entry to incorporate the Sami (Native Scandinavian) language in their song. They ended up winning the televote, but a poor showing in the jury vote meant they only finished sixth.

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* Norway's 2019 entry was "Spirit in the Sky" by [=KEiiNO=], an upbeat, pro-equality song that is notable for being the first second Eurovision entry ever[[labelnote:*]]first time was in 1980[[/labelnote]] to incorporate the Sami (Native Scandinavian) language in their song. They ended up winning the televote, but a poor showing in the jury vote meant they only finished sixth.


* HandicappedBadass: 2015 gave us both Pertti Kurikan Nimipäivät, a Finnish punk rock band made up of men with intellectual disabilities[[note]]Sadly, they ended up last place in their semi-final[[/note]] and Monika Kuszyńska from Poland, who performed a wonderfully moving and heartwarming song, in a wheelchair.

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* HandicappedBadass: HandicappedBadass:
** Blind singer and pianist Serafín Zubiri represented Spain twice (1992 and 2000).
**
2015 gave us both Pertti Kurikan Nimipäivät, a Finnish punk rock band made up of men with intellectual disabilities[[note]]Sadly, they ended up last place in their semi-final[[/note]] and Monika Kuszyńska from Poland, who performed a wonderfully moving and heartwarming song, in a wheelchair.


There have been a handful of Eurovision spinoffs over the years, including Junior Eurovision, which runs every autumn, the short-lived Eurovision Dance Contest, and an Asian version of the contest that was set to debut in 2018, [[ScheduleSlip but didn't end up happening quite then]]. During the 2019 edition in Tel Aviv, the EBU announced they had begun developing an American version —tentatively titled the American Song Contest— for a planned 2021 debut.

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There have been a handful of Eurovision spinoffs over the years, including Junior Eurovision, which runs every autumn, the short-lived Eurovision Dance Contest, and an Asian version of the contest that was set to debut in 2018, [[ScheduleSlip but didn't end up happening quite then]].then]], and currently appears to be stuck in DevelopmentHell. During the 2019 edition in Tel Aviv, the EBU announced they had begun developing an American version —tentatively titled the American Song Contest— for a planned 2021 debut.


* Iceland's 2019 entry....well...they sent Creator/{{Hatari}}, a "anti-capitalist BDSM techno performance art group" (their words, not ours) who sang "Hatrið mun sigra", which literally translates to "Hatred will prevail".

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* Iceland's 2019 entry....well...they sent Creator/{{Hatari}}, Music/{{Hatari|Band}}, a "anti-capitalist BDSM techno performance art group" (their words, not ours) who sang "Hatrið mun sigra", which literally translates to "Hatred will prevail".

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* Norway's 2019 entry was "Spirit in the Sky" by [=KEiiNO=], an upbeat, pro-equality song that is notable for being the first Eurovision entry to incorporate the Sami (Native Scandinavian) language in their song. They ended up winning the televote, but a poor showing in the jury vote meant they only finished sixth.
* Iceland's 2019 entry....well...they sent Creator/{{Hatari}}, a "anti-capitalist BDSM techno performance art group" (their words, not ours) who sang "Hatrið mun sigra", which literally translates to "Hatred will prevail".


In 2015 [[ArtifactTitle/LiveActionTV the definition of "Eurovision" was extended to include Australia]] [[MilestoneCelebration for the sixtieth anniversary of the contest]], having been featured in an intermission for 2014. However, this isn't the first time Aussies had been present in the contest. A completely Australian act -- where all performers are Aussie and not with heritage from the country they were representing -- has happened before, when Olivia Newton-John competed for the UK and three-time winner Johnny Logan (who later immigrated) for Ireland. While Australia was originally going to participate just as a one-off for the milestone, their debut entry was so well-received that they returned for the 2016 contest. The Australian entry that year, Dami Im, ''almost won'' until a last-minute upset by Ukraine thanks to a 132-point gap in televoting offsetting Oz's 109-point lead (had Australia won, they would have paired with a European city to keep the contest in Europe).

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In 2015 [[ArtifactTitle/LiveActionTV the definition of "Eurovision" was extended to include Australia]] [[MilestoneCelebration for the sixtieth anniversary of the contest]], having been featured in an intermission for 2014. However, this isn't the first time Aussies had been present in the contest. A completely Australian act -- where all performers are Aussie and not with heritage from the country they were representing -- has happened before, when Olivia Newton-John competed for the UK and three-time winner Johnny Logan (who later immigrated) for Ireland. While Australia was originally going to participate just as a one-off for the milestone, their debut entry was so well-received that they returned for the 2016 contest. The Australian entry that year, Dami Im, ''almost won'' until a last-minute upset by Ukraine thanks to a 132-point gap in televoting offsetting Oz's 109-point lead (had (if Australia won, does win, they would have paired pair up with a European city to keep the contest in Europe).



** By some definitions of Europe Israel is stretching it, as well.

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** By some definitions of Europe Europe, Azerbaijan and Israel is are stretching it, as well.



** Germany looks like they might be after this status - they finished last with 0 points in 2015[[note]]along with Austria - Germany was placed bottom due to tie-breaking rules preferring the song performed earlier[[/note]], last (but with points) in 2016 and second-last in 2017. They did manage to turn it around in 2018; a new selection process led to a strong pick in Michael Schulte's TearJerker "You Let Me Walk Alone," bringing them to a proud fourth place (and, beyond that, it was the first time Germany got ''douze points'' from anyone - four times, in fact - since their 2010 win). However, 2019 saw them return to previous form: they finished third-bottom and got nil points from the public vote.

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** Germany looks like they might be after this status - they finished last with 0 points in 2015[[note]]along with Austria - Germany was placed bottom due to tie-breaking rules preferring the song performed earlier[[/note]], last (but with points) in 2016 and second-last in 2017. They did manage to turn it around in 2018; a new selection process led to a strong pick in Michael Schulte's TearJerker "You Let Me Walk Alone," bringing them to a proud fourth place (and, beyond that, it was the first time Germany got ''douze points'' from anyone - four times, in fact - since their 2010 win). However, 2019 saw them return to previous form: they finished third-bottom second-bottom and got nil points from the public vote.

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* Music/OliviaNewtonJohn (United Kingdom, 1974)


* UglySlavicWomen: During the 2014 Contest, the Russian entry included a group of older GenreSavvy women dressed up as grandmothers, pushing the stereotype UpToEleven. The same year, Poland defied the trope with a somewhat {{fanservice}}y staging of a song extolling the charming beauty of Slavic girls.

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* UglySlavicWomen: During the 2014 2012 Contest, the Russian entry included a group of older GenreSavvy women dressed up as grandmothers, pushing the stereotype UpToEleven. The same year, In 2014, Poland defied the trope with a somewhat {{fanservice}}y staging of a song extolling the charming beauty of Slavic girls.


** Music/{{Madonna}} has been confirmed for 2019, in spite of the controversies that have abounded since she was first rumored for the gig (aside from the flak acts can receive from performing in Israel in general, also controversies about the content of her songs, and that the broadcaster was not paying for it, as well as the size of her entourage, and the claims it would be unfair on the competing acts, though the most famous of them, Finland's Darude, defended her expected performance, saying it boosts the brand). Also, it will have a magician, a TV spot with Gal Gadot, and Conchita, Foureira, Mans, and, despite the Ukraine's controversial withdrawal, Verka Serduchka, swapping each other's songs.

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** Music/{{Madonna}} has been confirmed for 2019, in spite of the controversies that have abounded since she was first rumored for the gig (aside from the flak acts can receive from performing in Israel in general, also controversies about the content of her songs, and that the broadcaster was not paying for it, as well as the size of her entourage, and the claims it would be unfair on the competing acts, though the most famous of them, Finland's Darude, Darude (who ended up placing last in his heat), defended her expected performance, saying it boosts the brand). Also, it will have had a magician, a TV spot with Gal Gadot, and Conchita, Foureira, Mans, and, despite the Ukraine's controversial withdrawal, Verka Serduchka, swapping each other's songs.



*** The next U.K. Song was called "Bigger than Us" and selected ahead of one called "Sweet Lies". "Bigger than Us" made history as the first ever entry whose writer represented another country as a singer in the same year, Swedish entry John Lundvik (UK born). Furthermore, 2015 winner Mans Zelmerlow has made several jokes mocking the political crisis when presenting UK's selections in 2018 and 2019.

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*** The next U.K. Song was called "Bigger than Us" and selected ahead of one called "Sweet Lies". "Bigger than Us" made history as the first ever entry whose writer represented another country as a singer in the same year, Swedish entry John Lundvik (UK born). Furthermore, 2015 winner Mans Zelmerlow has made several jokes mocking the political crisis when presenting UK's selections in 2018 and 2019. However, only Ireland gave the song any televotes in the final despite the fact that, whilst no one (or very few) was expecting him to prevent the UK from ending the decade without a top 10 entry, he was popular amongst his fellow contestants including champion elect Duncan Lawrence from neighbouring Netherlands (though Ireland had almost the exact same fortunes in their heat, with no televoting points outside UK, and, in the final, Germany got none at all, when surely those who mock the political debacle sympathise with Ireland and Germany)



*** The two time entrant for the Magyars either side, Joci Papai, went barefoot in the second occasion, in 2019, but didn't qualify.



** The Melodifestivalen-inspired voting system in place from 2016 – each jury announces in turn, then total televote points are added in ascending order – is deliberately designed to prevent runaway winners and heighten the drama of the results portion of the show (working incredibly well both times).

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** The Melodifestivalen-inspired voting system in place from 2016 – each jury announces in turn, then total televote points are added in ascending order – is deliberately designed to prevent runaway winners and heighten the drama of the results portion of the show (working incredibly well both times).all 3 times). In 2019, it was adjusted to be done in ascending jury vote order, ie, Spain and the Israeli hosts, the jury's bottom 2, would get televotes first, and Netherlands, North Macedonia (a nation who had never before made the top 10) and Sweden, would be the last to be read out. It was even more effective.



* DueToTheDead: In January 2016, BBC's previous ESC commentator Radio/TerryWogan passed away. Graham Norton toasted to him that year at the start of the 9th song, saying that Sir Terry (who was famous for getting progressively more drunk during his commentary) "would never start drinking before song no. 9." He did the same in 2017 (for seeming favourites Italy) and 2018 (for the UK's entry - before it was ruined).

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* DueToTheDead: In January 2016, BBC's previous ESC commentator Radio/TerryWogan passed away. Graham Norton toasted to him that year at the start of the 9th song, saying that Sir Terry (who was famous for getting progressively more drunk during his commentary) "would never start drinking before song no. 9." ", which a draw in March that year revealed would be hosts Sweden. He did the same in 2017 (for seeming favourites Italy) and 2018 (for the UK's entry - before it was ruined).ruined), and 2019 (Sweden again) .



* EveryYearTheyFizzleOut: The common feeling in Spain, where a ton of hype is built upon the election of that year's entrant, boosted by a large online contingent... only to come back down to earth with a bump when the votes are counted. Neither Edurne in 2015 nor Barei in 2016 got into the top 20 -- and who knows if either of them would have even made it past the semi-finals if Spain wasn't in the "Big Five". In 2017, Manel Navarro came dead last, with only 5 points from the televote (all from Portugal) and none from the juries, despite performing the song in other countries' selection shows, duetting with Lucie, and with a singer from a neighbouring country whose fortunes were rather different to his, as well as covering his fave ESC 2017 songs and covers of chart songs, such as one of Music/EdSheeran endorsed by Ed himself. In 2018, this was even worse, as Operación Triunfo, responsible for their relatively successful 2002-04 entries, was brought back, and Catalan singer Alfred and Navarrese Amaia were the most followed singers on Instagram, each with more followers than any other act at the start of selection, and were dating in real life to boot, but performed 2nd and placed 23rd. It doesn't help that the 2008 entrant, Rodolfo Chikilicuatre, was a "joke" entry that nobody in Spain actually expected to win, yet he still got a better ranking than many of the "serious" entries sent during the last 15 years.

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* EveryYearTheyFizzleOut: The common feeling in Spain, where a ton of hype is built upon the election of that year's entrant, boosted by a large online contingent... only to come back down to earth with a bump when the votes are counted. Neither Edurne in 2015 nor Barei in 2016 got into the top 20 -- and who knows if either of them would have even made it past the semi-finals if Spain wasn't in the "Big Five". In 2017, Manel Navarro came dead last, with only 5 points from the televote (all from Portugal) and none from the juries, despite performing the song in other countries' selection shows, duetting with Lucie, and with a singer from a neighbouring country whose fortunes were rather different to his, as well as covering his fave ESC 2017 songs and covers of chart songs, such as one of Music/EdSheeran endorsed by Ed himself. In 2018, this was even worse, as Operación Triunfo, responsible for their relatively successful 2002-04 entries, was brought back, and Catalan singer Alfred and Navarrese Amaia were the most followed singers on Instagram, each with more followers than any other act at the start of selection, and were dating in real life to boot, but performed 2nd and placed 23rd. In 2019, despite having a popular entry, its poor jury vote led to a 5th placing below 20th in a row. It doesn't help that the 2008 entrant, Rodolfo Chikilicuatre, was a "joke" entry that nobody in Spain actually expected to win, yet he still got a better ranking than many of the "serious" entries sent during the last 15 years.



** SuRie from United Kingdom in the 2018 Contest had a streaker who grabbed her microphone and shouted ”All of the Nazis of the UK media. We demand freedom. War is not peace !” in her performance.

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** SuRie from United Kingdom in the 2018 Contest had a streaker who grabbed her microphone and shouted ”All of the Nazis of the UK media. We demand freedom. War is not peace !” in her performance. There was fears that Israel in all its divisiveness hosting 2019 ESC would lead to more of this happening. It did (briefly) when Netta performed in the French selection, and a couple of boycott activists with banners ran onto the stage but they were removed, and no other incidents like this occurred, even though most selections, and the show itself from within TA, had controlled protests outside from such activists.



* MrFanservice: Much to the joy of many fans, 2016 host Måns Zelmerlöw stripped down to nothing but a stuffed animal to cover himself in the semifinals as a part of a gag. During the final, he ripped his shirt open to show off his very nice torso during a parody song about the perfect Eurovision song.

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* MrFanservice: Much to the joy of many fans, 2016 host Måns Zelmerlöw stripped down to nothing but a stuffed animal to cover himself in the semifinals as a part of a gag. During the final, he ripped his shirt open to show off his very nice torso during a parody song about the perfect Eurovision song. In 2019, he was regularly implored by Scott Mills and Assi Azar to take his shirt off prior to a slowed down cover of "Fuego", which is a very raunchy tune. He kept it on, however.

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