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The show, whilst at all times remaining funny, also had more serious plots and pathos, like the way the platoon react when they find out that Private Godfrey was a conscientious objector in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Although they were duly contrite upon discovering that Godfrey in fact served valorously as a volunteer stretcher-bearer, their behaviour was reprehensible, irrespective of Godfrey's wartime activities.

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The show, whilst at all times remaining funny, also had more serious plots and pathos, like the way the platoon react when they find out that Private Godfrey was a conscientious objector in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Although they were duly contrite upon discovering that Godfrey in fact served valorously on the Western Front as a volunteer stretcher-bearer, their behaviour was reprehensible, they realised that, irrespective of Godfrey's wartime activities.
activities, their behaviour had been reprehensible.



* AcidRefluxNightmare: In "A Soldier's Farewell", Captain Mainwaring has a dream that he is Napoleon after Waterloo and Sergeant Wilson is the Duke of Wellington, among others.

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* AcidRefluxNightmare: In "A Soldier's Farewell", Captain Mainwaring has a cheese-induced dream that he is Napoleon after Waterloo and Sergeant Wilson is the Duke of Wellington, among others.



* TheGhost: Mainwaring's wife. The closest we get to seeing her is the large dent she makes in the top half of a pair of bunk beds. She is finally seen in the 2016 movie.

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* TheGhost: Mainwaring's wife. The closest we get to seeing her is the large dent she makes in the top half of a pair of bunk beds. She is finally seen in the 2016 movie.movie, when she's running a women's auxiliary platoon (of which most of the members are relatives or love interests of the main characters).



* HumbleHero: Godfrey, who was awarded the Military Medal for bravery as a stretcher-bearer during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, but doesn't wear the ribbon on his uniform as he finds it "too garish".
** He's not the only one who doesn't wear medal ribbons he's entitled to wear - Wilson and Fraser are, respectively, a former Army officer and a former Royal Navy cook, both of whom saw active service in WWI. Whether their lack of medal ribbons was intentional or an oversight on behalf of the costume department is unclear, but they and Godfrey all have the correct medal ribbons on their uniforms in the 2015 movie.



** And none braver than Mainwaring himself, who would be the last man out of a bombed building and once faced down a desperate German prisoner with an unloaded gun. (It turned out that the German's gun was unloaded too.)

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** And none braver than Mainwaring himself, who would be the last man out of a bombed building and once faced down a desperate German prisoner with an unloaded gun. (It turned out that the German's gun was unloaded too.)too, but he didn't know that at the time).



** Curiously inverted with the likes of Fraser, Godfrey and Wilson - all of whom served in WWI but none of whom have their medal ribbons on their uniforms, in contrast to Jones.
** Invoked in the 2016 movie when Jones reveals that he actually has ''no'' combat experience, having served in the Army's catering section.

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** Curiously inverted with the likes of Fraser, Godfrey and Wilson - all of whom served in WWI UsefulNotes/WorldWarI but none of whom have their medal ribbons on their uniforms, in contrast to Jones.
** Invoked in the 2016 movie when Jones reveals that he doesn't actually has ''no'' have any combat experience, having served in the Army's catering ''catering'' section.


* PhonyVeteran: Captain Mainwaring had a habit of exaggerating his military service in the Great War.

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* PhonyVeteran: Captain Mainwaring had a habit of exaggerating his military service in the Great War.service.


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** Curiously inverted with the likes of Fraser, Godfrey and Wilson - all of whom served in WWI but none of whom have their medal ribbons on their uniforms, in contrast to Jones.
** Invoked in the 2016 movie when Jones reveals that he actually has ''no'' combat experience, having served in the Army's catering section.

Added DiffLines:

* AttractiveBentSpecies: In "Operation Kilt", the platoon attempts to use a pantomime cow to sneak up on a highland regiment during a training exercise. Things do not go according to plan when [[BlackComedyRape a bull takes an interest]].


* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Barely even trying. In the episode "The Two and a Half Feathers", Jones describes his patrol in the Sudan encountering an elderly fakir (a sort of monk, pronounced "fa-keer"). Jones constantly refers to him as the "Old Fakir" (pronouncing it as "fark-er"). Say it out loud and wonder how that made it past the censors...
** Jones also adopts an arch, hand-on-hip pose when recounting anecdotes referring to Lord Kitchener, which wasn’t widely understood at the time of transmission.
** Various one-liners make it obvious that Wilson is sleeping with Mrs Pike; Walker is implied to be something of a philanderer, often involving married women, and the Vicar is implied to be gay at a time when this had only very recently been legalised in the UK (none of the other characters appear to regard any of this as particularly important).
** And at least one episode title. "Round And Round Went The Great Big Wheel" is a quote from a ''really'' filthy song.

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%% * GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Barely even trying. In the episode "The Two GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to overwhelming and a Half Feathers", Jones describes his patrol persistent misuse, GCPTR is on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are reading this in the Sudan encountering an elderly fakir (a sort of monk, pronounced "fa-keer"). Jones constantly refers to him as future, please check the "Old Fakir" (pronouncing it as "fark-er"). Say it out loud and wonder how that made it past the censors...
** Jones also adopts an arch, hand-on-hip pose when recounting anecdotes referring
trope page to Lord Kitchener, which wasn’t widely understood at the time of transmission.
** Various one-liners
make it obvious that Wilson is sleeping with Mrs Pike; Walker is implied to be something of a philanderer, often involving married women, and sure your example fits the Vicar is implied to be gay at a time when this had only very recently been legalised in the UK (none of the other characters appear to regard any of this as particularly important).
** And at least one episode title. "Round And Round Went The Great Big Wheel" is a quote from a ''really'' filthy song.
current definition.

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* DontExplainTheJoke: In one episode, Jones tells a story about a soldier who reports for training, and when his commanding officer tells him to choose between a Lee-Enfield and a Martini, responds "make it a martini, and go easy with the ice!" He then follows this up with a long-winded explanation of how the soldier was confusing a Martini-Henry rifle with an alcoholic drink.

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* DoubleStandardsAbuseFemaleOnMale: In "War Dance", Mainwaring showing up to the dance with a black eye from his wife is PlayedForLaughs.


* '''The Rev. Timothy Farthing''' (Frank Williams): TheVicar.

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* '''The Rev. Timothy Farthing''' (Frank Williams): TheVicar. A bit more reasonable than Hodges and the Verger, but easily exasperated by the platoon's over-enthusiasm and prone to dithering. The office and hall that Mainwaring and Hodges have claimed (and often bicker over) are technically owned and run by him.

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* NunsAreFunny: Played with; while nuns themselves only very infrequently showed up (for perhaps obvious reasons), a frequent point of conversation was the point of enemy parachutists, saboteurs and Fifth Columnists disguising themselves as nuns[[note]]this is -- sort of -- TruthInTelevision; the idea of enemy agents secretly dressing as nuns to carry out covert operations, due to the supposed impenetrability of the typical nun's habit, was popularly circulated during the early days of the invasion of Western Europe, though it was founded on very questionable evidence and is generally considered to be a myth. Similar rumours dated back to World War One.[[/note]]. In "The Deadly Attachment", this ends up leading to a lengthy tangent regarding the possibility of real nuns defecting by stealing a German plane and parachuting out.


The show, whilst at all times remaining funny, also had more serious plots and pathos, like the way the platoon react when they find out that Private Godfrey was a conscientious objector in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. [[spoiler: Although they were duly contrite upon discovering that Godfrey in fact served valorously as a volunteer stretcher-bearer, their behaviour was reprehensible, irrespective of Godfrey's wartime activities.]]

to:

The show, whilst at all times remaining funny, also had more serious plots and pathos, like the way the platoon react when they find out that Private Godfrey was a conscientious objector in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. [[spoiler: Although they were duly contrite upon discovering that Godfrey in fact served valorously as a volunteer stretcher-bearer, their behaviour was reprehensible, irrespective of Godfrey's wartime activities.]]
activities.

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* AloofLeaderAffableSubordinate: Captain Mainwaring and Sergeant Wilson.


* PantomimeAnimal: In "Operation Kilt", the platoon attempts to use a pantomime cow to sneak up on a highland regiment during a training exercise. Things do not according to plan [[BlackComedyRape when a bull takes an interest]].

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* PantomimeAnimal: In "Operation Kilt", the platoon attempts to use a pantomime cow to sneak up on a highland regiment during a training exercise. Things do not go according to plan [[BlackComedyRape when a bull takes an interest]].


Aside from their individual catchphrases, a character tended to say, "There is a war on, you know" in almost every episode.

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** Aside from their individual character catchphrases, a character tended to say, at least one person would (rather officiously) declare "There is ''is'' a war on, you know" know..." in almost every episode.


** Catchphrases: "Stupid boy" (directed at Pike), "Good thinking, Wilson. [[GladIThoughtOfIt I was wondering who'd be the first to spot that]]" (whenever Wilson points out what he's doing wrong), and "I think you're getting into the realms of fantasy Jones" (at the end of one of Jones' rambling monologues).



** Catchphrase: "Are you sure that's ''wise''?" (usually in response to the ZanyScheme of the week) as well as "How absolutely lovely!" when responding to something that Mainwaring would prefer to treat as SeriousBusiness.



** Four catchphrases: "Don't panic" (while panicking), "Permission to speak, sir?", "They don't like it up 'em" (talking about the African tribesmen ("fuzzy-wuzzies") he fought in his youth and while flourishing a [[BayonetYa bayonet]]), and "Sir, I should like to volunteer to be the one to... " (whenever Mainwaring looks for a volunteer for something).



** Catchphrase: "Uncle Arthur?"



** Catchphrase: [[DoomyDoomsOfDoom "We're doomed!"]] (words can't quite describe his delivery, but it would not look out of place on the set of a Film/{{Hammer Horror}} film, on a villager warning the hero not to go up to the castle.) Also, "Ho'd on, Cap'n Mainwaring," in response to one of the Captain's suggestions.



** Catchphrase: "Might I be excused ..." (Gesturing to the bathroom, or a convenient hedge)



** Catchphrases: "Now look 'ere, Napoleon...", "Ruddy 'ooligans!" and "Put that light out! PUT THAT BLOODY LIGHT OUT!"



* CatchPhrase: Aside from their individual catchphrases, a character tended to say, "There is a war on, you know" in almost every episode.

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* CatchPhrase: Each main character had at least one main catchphrase, and some developed others as the series progressed. While a more complete list can be found on the individual entries at the character page, the more well-known ones for each character were:
** Captain Mainwaring: "(You) stupid boy!" (directed at Pike); "I think you're getting into the realms of fantasy, Jones..."
** Sgt. Wilson: "Are you sure / Do you think that's ''wise'', sir?"
** Corporal Jones: "Don't panic!" (while panicking); "Permission to speak, sir?"; "They don't like it up 'em!" ; and "Sir, I should like to volunteer to be the one to... "
** Private Pike: "If you don't let me [do X] I'll tell Mum!"
** Private Frazer: "We're ''doomed''... ''doomed''..." [Accompanied by a mad, wild-eyed stare that would not be out of place in a Hammer Horror film]
** Private Godfrey: "Do you think I might be [[PottyEmergency excused]], sir?"
** Warden Hodges: "Put that light out! PUT THAT BLOODY LIGHT OUT!"; "You ruddy 'ooligans!"; "Now look 'ere, Napoleon..." [directed at Mainwaring]
Aside from their individual catchphrases, a character tended to say, "There is a war on, you know" in almost every episode.


** Private Sponge himself is something of an example of this; while as noted in the description he tended to be an extra given some speaking lines whenever the characters needed to talk to someone outside the main cast, he began to get more substantial roles in episodes following the death of Jimmy Beck, as his character was written out and the writers would often need someone to fill his place. It didn't ever get to PromotedToOpeningTitles status, but he's nevertheless a lot more prominent from Series 7 onwards.

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** Private Sponge himself is something of an example of this; while as noted in the description he tended to be an extra given some speaking lines whenever the characters needed to talk to someone outside the main cast, he began to get more substantial roles in episodes following the death of Jimmy Beck, as his character was written out and the writers would often need someone to fill his place. It didn't ever get to PromotedToOpeningTitles status, but he's nevertheless a lot more prominent from about Series 7 onwards.


* AscendedExtra: The previously unnamed Private Desmond, when he joins the main characters on a mission in the episode "Sons of the Sea." This part was originally intended for Private Sponge but his actor was unavailable.

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* AscendedExtra: AscendedExtra:
**
The previously unnamed Private Desmond, when he joins the main characters on a mission in the episode "Sons of the Sea." This part was originally intended for Private Sponge but his actor was unavailable.
** Private Sponge himself is something of an example of this; while as noted in the description he tended to be an extra given some speaking lines whenever the characters needed to talk to someone outside the main cast, he began to get more substantial roles in episodes following the death of Jimmy Beck, as his character was written out and the writers would often need someone to fill his place. It didn't ever get to PromotedToOpeningTitles status, but he's nevertheless a lot more prominent from Series 7 onwards.



* BadassPacifist: In "Branded", it's revealed that Godfrey was a conscientious objector during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, causing many of his friends to regard him as a coward and lose respect for him. He earns it all back by the end of the episode when it's further revealed that he applied for training as a [[TheMedic field medic]], and won medals for bravery by venturing into No Man's Land in search of wounded soldiers and carrying them on his back, under heavy fire, across the barbed wire and minefields of the Battle of the Somme, to safety. [[HumbleHero He thinks that his military medal is "too garish" for someone like him]].

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* BadassPacifist: In "Branded", it's revealed that Godfrey was a conscientious objector during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, causing many of his friends to regard him as a coward and lose respect for him. He earns it all back by the end of the episode and then some when it's further revealed that he applied for training as a [[TheMedic field medic]], and won medals for bravery by venturing into No Man's Land in search of wounded soldiers and carrying them on his back, under heavy fire, across the barbed wire and minefields of the Battle of the Somme, to safety. [[HumbleHero He thinks that his military medal is "too garish" for someone like him]].

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