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* WholePlotReference: "This Bunny for Hire" is Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace," only with a (supposedly) crystal vase instead of (supposedly) diamond jewelry.

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* WholePlotReference: WholePlotReference:
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"This Bunny for Hire" is Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace," only with a (supposedly) crystal vase instead of (supposedly) diamond jewelry.


** Sometimes, the lessons weren't that much of an Aesop as they were learning about something like spelling homonyms, what adverbs are, or what the compass rose symbols need.

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** Sometimes, the lessons weren't that much of an Aesop as they were learning about something like spelling homonyms, what adverbs are, or what the compass rose symbols need.are.


** ''The Sound and the Furry'' centers around the whole cast learning sign language and the Queen and the White Rabbit don't even know what it is until about halfway into the episode. In ''Take My Tonsils... Please!'', during the musical number going over ways to communicate without speaking to the Hatter, the two mention sign language, with the Rabbit even signing the Queen's singing part. No matter what order you watch the episodes in, it makes no sense continuity-wise (if the Hatter knew that he was going to lose his voice after getting his tonsils removed, why didn't they think of sign language right away?).

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** ''The Sound and the Furry'' centers around the whole cast learning sign language and the Queen and the White Rabbit don't even know what it is until about halfway into the episode. In ''Take My Tonsils... Please!'', during the musical number going over ways to communicate without speaking to the Hatter, the two mention sign language, with the Rabbit even signing the Queen's singing part. No matter what order you watch the episodes in, it makes no sense continuity-wise (if the Hatter knew that he was going to lose his voice after getting his tonsils removed, why didn't they think of sign language right away?). This is softened a little by the fact that he had to appear on TV.



* StrictlyFormula: The plots were all built around AnAesop (the basic formula is in the article description), but the characters themselves arguably kept the show entertaining.
* StylisticSuck: One episode has the Queen of Hearts try to make a low-budget film about a dinner party, and has the White Rabbit film it. Unfortunately she takes his glasses away... and he's still on roller skates. Sure enough, [[RealityEnsues the camera ends up on the floor]] because the rabbit accidentally rolled a tray right into the camera.
** The caterpillar's storybooks intentionally have very rudimentary animation to make it look like illustrations in a storybook.

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* StrictlyFormula: The plots were all built around AnAesop (the basic formula is in the article description), but the characters themselves arguably kept the show entertaining.
entertaining. It helped that, aside from the Caterpillar, Dormouse, and the Cheshire Cat, every character took turns learning the episode's aesop.
* StylisticSuck: One episode has the Queen of Hearts try to make a low-budget film about a dinner party, and has the White Rabbit film it. Unfortunately she takes his glasses away... and he's still on roller skates. Sure enough, [[RealityEnsues the camera ends up on the floor]] because the rabbit accidentally rolled a tray right into the camera.
**
The caterpillar's storybooks intentionally have very rudimentary animation to make it look like illustrations in a storybook.


* {{Catchphrase}}: The Mad Hatter's "How true that is" and the Queen's "Oh harrumph!"

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* {{Catchphrase}}: The Mad Hatter's "How true that is" and is", the Queen's "Oh harrumph!"harrumph!", and the Caterpillar relating to the story he is going to read the characters.



* CompressedVice: This appears a ''lot'' on this show. Several episodes have one or more characters abruptly developing a bad character trait--the Hatter can't resist reading the Hare's mail, Tweedledum has been eating junk food non-stop, the Hare develops a superiority complex, the Queen suddenly loses all patience for people talking during her speeches, all of the male characters start doing nothing but watch television...the list goes on. But after twenty-two minutes, the problem would be solved, and never brought up again.

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* CompressedVice: This appears a ''lot'' on this show. Several episodes have one or more characters abruptly developing a bad character trait--the Hatter can't resist reading the Hare's mail, Tweedledum has been eating junk food non-stop, the Hare develops a superiority complex, the Queen suddenly loses all patience for people talking during her speeches, all of the male characters sans the Rabbit&Dormouse start doing nothing but watch television...the list goes on. But after twenty-two minutes, the problem would be solved, and never brought up again.

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* ArtShift: Whenever the Caterpillar reads a story, it turns to claymation.

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* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: One episode has a fruit that can make you very strong, but can make you sick if you have too much. Tweedle Dum takes it to increase his performance at a sport. This has some allusions to steroid abuse - fortunately he only "got sick", since steroid abuse can have all sorts of nasty side effects.
** The same situation also has the queen note that the plant ''with'' said fruit on it is indeed beautiful, but it is ''not'' worth having in her garden due to its risk.
** Another episode also has the White Rabbit bring in a plant from a cousin that, when watered, sprouts and covers everything in a manner ''very'' similar to Kudzu.


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** This is especially true in one episode in which the queen learns of a tree whose fruit can make you stronger, but can ''also'' make you very sick. Rather than use it for personal gain or order the Hatter&Hare to move it into her garden, she says having a poisonous plant (no matter how spectacular) is actually very dangerous - and not a good idea. She similarly doesn't ''ban'' anyone from eating the fruit, she just makes a decree that they should use their better judgment with it after Tweedle Dum gets sick.

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** In the episode about sign language and not jumping to conclusions, when she finds out that the Hare's cousin is deaf and she (and the rabbit) simply assumed they were being blown off, experiences a MyGodWhatHaveIDone and comes ''in person'' to apologise at the train station for her.

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** Sometimes, the lessons weren't that much of an Aesop as they were learning about something like spelling homonyms, what adverbs are, or what the compass rose symbols need.


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* ArtisticLicenseAnimalCare: Alice is depicted sometimes having a goldfish in a bowl with only water. This is a ''very'' bad thing to do with goldfish as it does not leave enough space. However, she only has the goldfish in her room a few times, suggesting it might be a temporary place while her family cleans the tank.


** It's somewhat softened by the fact that both the Red Queen and the White Rabbit say that watching television is OK in moderation throughout the episode, unlike other shows that point out how absolutely ''amazing'' a lack of television is ([[WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}} "Arthur's TV-Free Week"]] comes to mind). Plus it seems that Wonderland operates on a different time schedule, considering that the whole episode takes place over three days, but when Alice exits her mirror, she talks to Dinah as if she left two minutes ago.

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** It's somewhat softened by the fact that both the Red Queen and the White Rabbit say that watching television is OK in moderation throughout the episode, unlike other shows that point out how absolutely ''amazing'' a lack of television is ([[WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}} "Arthur's TV-Free Week"]] comes to mind). Plus it seems that Wonderland operates on a different time schedule, considering that the whole episode takes place over three days, but when Alice exits her mirror, she talks to Dinah as if she left two minutes ago. It's also softened by the fact that Alice ''does'' have a normal life, she just goes into Wonderland when she needs to think about a moral problem.


* StylisticSuck: One episode has the Queen of Hearts try to make a low-budget film about a dinner party, and has the White Rabbit film it. Unfortunately she takes his glasses away... and he's still on roller skates. Sure enough, [[RealityEnsues the camera ends up on the floor]] because the rabbit fell down while filming.

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* StylisticSuck: One episode has the Queen of Hearts try to make a low-budget film about a dinner party, and has the White Rabbit film it. Unfortunately she takes his glasses away... and he's still on roller skates. Sure enough, [[RealityEnsues the camera ends up on the floor]] because the rabbit fell down while filming.accidentally rolled a tray right into the camera.
** The caterpillar's storybooks intentionally have very rudimentary animation to make it look like illustrations in a storybook.


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** "Pretzelmania" is basically an adaptation of the kids' book "Too Many Tamales".


* BigFatFuture: In "Bah Hamburger," the Ghost of Nutrition Yet to Come shows Tweedledee that if he doesn't get his junk food habit under control, he'll become so enormous and round that he has to be rolled from place to place, and abandoned when his friends go to play games.



* BlackBossLady: The Queen of Hearts--African-American, and the only authority figure in Wonderland.



** It even extends beyond the group. In "Copy Catter Hatter," we're told that the title character is the Mad Hatter's "second cousin, twice removed." This has nothing to do with the actual degree of their relation--instead, he's so bad that the rest of his family kicked him out, or "removed," him from the family tree once, then did it again at another point. Hence, a second cousin "twice removed."



* MagicFeather: In "Through the Looking Glasses," the Cheshire Cat gives the White Rabbit a pair of rose-colored glasses, tricking him into thinking they're magic and can make everything look more beautiful. The glasses truly seem to work for everyone, but in the end it turns out they're not magic at all the belief that they were just made everyone look at things in a different way and notice the beauty that was always there,

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* MagicFeather: In "Through the Looking Glasses," the Cheshire Cat gives the White Rabbit a pair of rose-colored glasses, tricking him into thinking they're magic and can make everything look more beautiful. The glasses truly seem to work for everyone, but in the end it turns out they're not magic at all the belief that they were just made everyone look at things in a different way and notice the beauty that was always there,there.
* MeaningfulName: The Walrus's invisible best friend is named Mr. Pinniped. "Pinniped" is the Latin for "fin-footed," a term used to describe mammals with fin-like feet--such as walruses.



* RealAfterAll: An odd example. The Walrus's best friend Mr. Pinniped is invisible. In their debut episode, this is treated by the characters as a lie (because walruses are notorious for making up stories), but Mr. Pinniped is very much real. It's confirmed in an episode where someone is tagging Wonderland with graffiti--the culprit turns out to be Mr. Pinniped, who was trying to get more attention from the group.



* WholePlotReference: "This Bunny for Hire" is Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace," only with a (supposedly) crystal vase instead of (supposedly) diamond jewelry.



* YetAnotherChristmasCarol: This time with a healthy eating theme! Tweedledum, who is apparently the "King of Junk Food," is visited by a Jacob Marley-esque Hare and the Ghosts of Nutrition Past (the Hatter), Present (the Queen), and Future (the White Rabit) to learn about the consequences of his diet.

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* YetAnotherChristmasCarol: This time with a healthy eating theme! Tweedledum, who is apparently the "King of Junk Food," is visited by a Jacob Marley-esque Hare and the Ghosts of Nutrition Past (the Hatter), Present (the Queen), and Future (the White Rabit) Rabbit) to learn about the consequences of his diet.

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* StylisticSuck: One episode has the Queen of Hearts try to make a low-budget film about a dinner party, and has the White Rabbit film it. Unfortunately she takes his glasses away... and he's still on roller skates. Sure enough, [[RealityEnsues the camera ends up on the floor]] because the rabbit fell down while filming.

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* ActorAllusion: Featured one ''within the same series'': the host of ''Lifestyles of the Royal and Famous'', Hugh B. Happy, is played by the same actor as the Caterpillar, who remarks while watching that he seems familiar.

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* ThePerformerKing: The Red Queen has been known to perform for her subjects.


* LovableNerd: The March Hare. He's very {{Adorkable}}, wears NerdGlasses and tacky clothes and is pretty intelligent, though short on common sense, and is also a very likeable guy.

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* LovableNerd: The March Hare. He's very {{Adorkable}}, wears NerdGlasses and tacky clothes and is pretty intelligent, though [[CloudCuckoolander short on common sense, sense]], and is also a very likeable guy.likable guy.
* MagicFeather: In "Through the Looking Glasses," the Cheshire Cat gives the White Rabbit a pair of rose-colored glasses, tricking him into thinking they're magic and can make everything look more beautiful. The glasses truly seem to work for everyone, but in the end it turns out they're not magic at all the belief that they were just made everyone look at things in a different way and notice the beauty that was always there,

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