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* CouchGag: Grampa is asleep on the couch until he's startled awake when the family comes in.


* AdultsAreUseless: When Bart and Lisa fight over the centerpiece, and then Bart throws said centerpiece into the fire, the adults just sit and watch—with Grampa even getting ''excited'' watching it. It isn't until after Lisa runs crying to her room that Marge and Homer come down hard on Bart, when it's too late to deescalate the situation.

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* AdultsAreUseless: When Bart and Lisa fight over the centerpiece, and then Bart throws said centerpiece into the fire, the adults just sit and watch—with Grampa even getting ''excited'' watching it. It isn't until after Lisa runs crying to her room that Marge and Homer come down hard on Bart, Bart when it's too late to deescalate the situation.



* BreakingTheFourthWall: A very rare non-''Treehouse'' example. When watching the Macy's Parade on TV, Homer tells Bart that you can't just introduce flash-in-the-pan cartoon characters willy nilly or you'll turn that parade into a farce. Immediately afterwards, a Bart Simpson float can be seen on the TV.

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* BreakingTheFourthWall: A very rare non-''Treehouse'' example. When watching the Macy's Parade on TV, Homer tells Bart that you can't just introduce flash-in-the-pan cartoon characters willy nilly or you'll turn that parade into a farce. Immediately afterwards, afterward, a Bart Simpson float can be seen on the TV.



* {{Hypocrite}}: The adults don't step in when Bart tries to move Lisa's centerpiece, nor try to save it when he throws it into the fire, but are quick to come down on him once it's destroyed.

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* HardTruthAesop: The episode emphasizes that even if a kid does a terrible thing, the adults in charge will cause more harm if they refuse to act like adults, causing TheChainOfHarm. If any of the parents or relatives had broken up the fight between Bart and Lisa, it wouldn't have escalated. Lou and Will emphasize this with their WhatTheHellHero to Marge about telling her preteen son that he ruined Thanksgiving, that it was a very messed-up thing to say, and that she was at a RageBreakingPoint was no excuse. Indeed, Bart seems prepared to spend Thanksgiving night on the roof, since he doesn't know if he'll be welcome home or if anyone will accept his apology because of how badly all the adults reacted; it takes Lisa crying for him to drum up the courage to talk to her and give a sincere apology.
* {{Hypocrite}}: The adults don't step in when Bart tries to move Lisa's centerpiece, nor try to save it when he throws it into the fire, but are quick to come down on him once it's destroyed. They pay for this when Bart runs away.


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* LaserGuidedKarma: Bart and his family inflict this on each other. He destroys the centerpiece in a fit of anger or accident and refuses to apologize, but the adults could have split up the siblings and made room on the table for both the centerpiece and the turkey. Bart is sent to his room after Marge tells him "You ruined Thanksgiving!" and ordered to apologize. He runs away from home, causing the motherload of AdultFear when his family realizes he went to a homeless shelter and then vanished. Will and Lou give Marge a WhatTheHellHero for what she said, while Bart eventually suffers a JerkassRealization after he hears Lisa crying and talks to her. It's only when Bart apologizes to Lisa, that his parents let him come inside without any fuss, that they can finally enjoy dinner in peace. All in all, Lisa is the only innocent party who didn't deserve any of the drama


* ThanksgivingEpisode: While "Homer vs. Dignity"[[note]]The climax centers around a parade like the Macy's parade and Homer being expected to shower the audience with fish guts as a prank to end all pranks.[[/note]] and "Homer the Moe"[[note]]Homer hunting for a Thanksgiving turkey as part of his hunting club which was an attempt to get around local liquor laws.[[/note]] also have Thanksgiving in the plot, those episodes aired on Sunday instead of Thursday and had Thanksgiving shoehorned into the final act. This episode actually aired on Thanksgiving (which is on the fourth Thursday of November in America, while ''TheSimpsons'' were competing with ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' on Thursdays. Canadian Thanksgiving is in October) and centered on a Thanksgiving meal gone bad. While many Thanksgiving episodes indeed are about ill-fated dinners, and there's plenty of in-jokes and gags, critics lauded this episode because it had actual sentiment and one of its central characters was enlightened about the meaning of the holiday (after he runs into two homeless men who have very little if anything).

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* ThanksgivingEpisode: While "Homer vs. Dignity"[[note]]The climax centers around a parade like the Macy's parade and Homer being expected to shower the audience with fish guts as a prank to end all pranks.[[/note]] and "Homer the Moe"[[note]]Homer hunting for a Thanksgiving turkey as part of his hunting club which was an attempt to get around local liquor laws.[[/note]] also have Thanksgiving in the plot, those episodes aired on Sunday instead of Thursday and had Thanksgiving shoehorned into the final act. This episode actually aired on Thanksgiving (which is on the fourth Thursday of November in America, while ''TheSimpsons'' were competing with ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' on Thursdays. Canadian Thanksgiving is in October) and centered on a Thanksgiving meal gone bad. While many Thanksgiving episodes indeed are about ill-fated dinners, and there's plenty of in-jokes and gags, critics lauded this episode because it had actual sentiment and one of its central characters was enlightened about the meaning of the holiday (after he runs into two homeless men who have very little little, if anything).


* PlatonicKissing: While in the middle of hugging Bart after he feels bad and apologizes, she gives him a deep kiss on the cheek.

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* PlatonicKissing: While Lisa, while in the middle of hugging Bart after he feels bad and apologizes, she gives him a deep kiss on the cheek.


** Both Patty and Selma expressed concern when Bart isn't coming down the stairs to apologize.

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** Both Patty and Selma expressed express concern when Bart isn't coming doesn't come down the stairs to apologize.


** Later after observing the state of the real homeless during the holiday, he offers the twelve bucks he made from his blood donation to the two that befriended him.

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** Later Later, after observing the state of the real homeless during the holiday, he offers the twelve bucks he made from his blood donation to the two that befriended him.


Bart is told that if he can legitimately apologize, he will be allowed to dinner, but a stubborn Bart is convinced that he has done nothing wrong and that Lisa was to blame. Scoffing at the directive and thinking he doesn't have to take his punishment, Bart decides he's going to show his family a thing or two by running away. Santa's Little Helper, who had been thrown out of the house for taking Homer's drumstick, decides to join Bart as they wander through town. Bart first stops at a house that happens to be Mr. Burns' mansion, where he tries to swipe a freshly baked pie but is run off by Burns' bloodthirsty hounds. Later, after donating plasma at a local paid-donor blood bank (that happened to be open on Thanksgiving Day) for $12 cash, Bart passes out on the streets in a run-down part of Springfield. When he awakens, he's greeted by two street bums who bring him to a community Thanksgiving dinner for the less fortunate. There, Kent Brockman is preparing to do an insincere, self-serving TV commentary about the holiday and how society treats the poor and needy; during his live commentary, he interviews Bart, who claims he's homeless and "didn't apologize." Homer and Marge see the report and call the police, admitting to officers their fear that they may have been too harsh with Bart.

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Marge tells Bart is told that if he can legitimately apologize, sincerely apologizes, he will be allowed to dinner, but a stubborn Bart is convinced that he has done nothing wrong and that Lisa was to blame. Scoffing at the directive and thinking he doesn't have to take his punishment, Bart decides he's going to show his family a thing or two by running away. Santa's Little Helper, who had been thrown out of the house for taking Homer's drumstick, decides to join Bart as they wander through town. Bart first stops at a house that happens to be Mr. Burns' mansion, where he tries to swipe a freshly baked pie but is run off by Burns' bloodthirsty hounds. Later, after donating plasma at a local paid-donor blood bank (that happened to be open on Thanksgiving Day) for $12 cash, Bart passes out on the streets in a run-down part of Springfield. When he awakens, he's greeted by two street bums who bring him to a community Thanksgiving dinner for the less fortunate. There, Kent Brockman is preparing to do an insincere, self-serving TV commentary about the holiday and how society treats the poor and needy; during his live commentary, he interviews Bart, who claims he's homeless and "didn't apologize." Homer and Marge see the report and call the police, admitting to officers their fear that they may have been too harsh with Bart.


Meanwhile, Bart and the two homeless urchins begin to have a conversation, where Bart, seeing that his two new friends have no family or anything else, admits he has a family that loves and cares for him, and that he has plenty to be thankful for. He begins to feel remorseful and, after giving his $12 to the bums, decides to go home... dejected but realizing he may have learned something about the meaning of the holiday Thanksgiving.

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Meanwhile, Bart and the two homeless urchins begin to have a conversation, where Bart, seeing that his two new friends have no family or anything else, admits he has a family that loves and cares for him, and that he has plenty to be thankful for. He begins to feel remorseful and, after giving his $12 to the bums, decides to go home... dejected but realizing he may have learned something about the meaning of the holiday Thanksgiving.


Bart is told that if he can legitimately apologize, he will be allowed to dinner, but a stubborn Bart is convinced that he has done nothing wrong and that Lisa was to blame. Scoffing at the directive and thinking he doesn't have to take his punishment, Bart decides he's going to show his family a thing or two by running away. Santa's Little Helper, who had been thrown out of the house for taking Homer's drumstick, decides to join Bart as they wander through town. Bart first stops at a house that happens to be Mr. Burns' mansion, where he tries to swipe a freshly baked pie but is run off by Burns' bloodthirsty hounds. Later, after donating plasma at a local paid-donor blood bank (that happened to be open on Thanksgiving Day) for $12 cash, Bart passes out on the streets in a run-down part of Springfield. When he awakens, he's greeted by two street bums who bring him to a community Thanksgiving dinner for the less fortunate. There, Kent Brockman is preparing to do an insincere, self-serving commentary about the holiday and how society treats the poor and needy; during his live commentary, he interviews Bart, who claims he's homeless and "didn't apologize." Homer and Marge see the report and call the police, admitting to officers their fear that they may have been too harsh with Bart.

to:

Bart is told that if he can legitimately apologize, he will be allowed to dinner, but a stubborn Bart is convinced that he has done nothing wrong and that Lisa was to blame. Scoffing at the directive and thinking he doesn't have to take his punishment, Bart decides he's going to show his family a thing or two by running away. Santa's Little Helper, who had been thrown out of the house for taking Homer's drumstick, decides to join Bart as they wander through town. Bart first stops at a house that happens to be Mr. Burns' mansion, where he tries to swipe a freshly baked pie but is run off by Burns' bloodthirsty hounds. Later, after donating plasma at a local paid-donor blood bank (that happened to be open on Thanksgiving Day) for $12 cash, Bart passes out on the streets in a run-down part of Springfield. When he awakens, he's greeted by two street bums who bring him to a community Thanksgiving dinner for the less fortunate. There, Kent Brockman is preparing to do an insincere, self-serving TV commentary about the holiday and how society treats the poor and needy; during his live commentary, he interviews Bart, who claims he's homeless and "didn't apologize." Homer and Marge see the report and call the police, admitting to officers their fear that they may have been too harsh with Bart.


Bart is told that if he can legitimately apologize, he will be allowed to dinner, but a stubborn Bart is convinced that he has done nothing wrong and that Lisa was to blame. Scoffing at the directive and thinking he doesn't have to take his punishment, Bart decides he's going to show his family a thing or two by running away. Santa's Little Helper, who had been thrown out of the house, decides to join Bart as they wander through town. Bart first stops at a house that happens to be Mr. Burns' mansion, where he tries to swipe a freshly baked pie but is run off by Burns' bloodthirsty hounds. Later, after donating plasma at a local paid-donor blood bank (that happened to be open on Thanksgiving Day) for $12 cash, Bart passes out on the streets in a run-down part of Springfield. When he awakens, he's greeted by two street bums who bring him to a community Thanksgiving dinner for the less fortunate. There, Kent Brockman is preparing to do an insincere, self-serving commentary about the holiday and how society treats the poor and needy; during his live commentary, he interviews Bart, who claims he's homeless and "didn't apologize." Homer and Marge see the report and call the police, admitting to officers their fear that they may have been too harsh with Bart.

to:

Bart is told that if he can legitimately apologize, he will be allowed to dinner, but a stubborn Bart is convinced that he has done nothing wrong and that Lisa was to blame. Scoffing at the directive and thinking he doesn't have to take his punishment, Bart decides he's going to show his family a thing or two by running away. Santa's Little Helper, who had been thrown out of the house, house for taking Homer's drumstick, decides to join Bart as they wander through town. Bart first stops at a house that happens to be Mr. Burns' mansion, where he tries to swipe a freshly baked pie but is run off by Burns' bloodthirsty hounds. Later, after donating plasma at a local paid-donor blood bank (that happened to be open on Thanksgiving Day) for $12 cash, Bart passes out on the streets in a run-down part of Springfield. When he awakens, he's greeted by two street bums who bring him to a community Thanksgiving dinner for the less fortunate. There, Kent Brockman is preparing to do an insincere, self-serving commentary about the holiday and how society treats the poor and needy; during his live commentary, he interviews Bart, who claims he's homeless and "didn't apologize." Homer and Marge see the report and call the police, admitting to officers their fear that they may have been too harsh with Bart.


It is Thanksgiving Day, and Homer is watching Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade on TV. Lisa is meticulously assembling a centerpiece to place on the family dinner table (with a little help from Maggie), while Marge is busy cooking and preparing for the guests: Patty, Selma, Jacqueline and Grampa. Bart is basically getting in everyone's way. Later, as the guests assemble at the table, Lisa brings in the centerpiece and proudly shows it off, just as Bart brings in the turkey. When Bart tries to jockey for position in placing the turkey platter, he gets into an argument with Lisa about where her centerpiece should be set, resulting in a fight and, in the middle of the ruckus, the centerpiece lands inside the fireplace and instantly is destroyed in the flames. Lisa is devastated and runs to her room in tears, while Bart refuses to accept responsibility. An angry Marge—with Homer, in a rare move, backing her up—sends Bart to his room without dinner, and declares that because of him, "you ruined Thanksgiving!"

Bart is told that if he can legitimately apologize and mean it, he will be allowed to dinner, but a stubborn Bart is convinced that he has done nothing wrong and that Lisa was to blame. Scoffing at the directive and thinking he doesn't have to take his punishment, Bart decides he's going to show his family a thing or two by running away. Santa's Little Helper, who had been thrown out of the house, decides to join Bart as they wander through town. Bart first stops at a house that happens to be Mr. Burns' mansion, where he tries to swipe a freshly baked pie but is run off by Burns' bloodthirsty hounds. Later, after donating plasma at a local paid-donor blood bank (that happened to be open on Thanksgiving Day) for $12 cash, Bart passes out on the streets in a run-down part of Springfield. When he awakens is greeted by two street bums who bring him to a community Thanksgiving dinner for the less fortunate. There, Kent Brockman is preparing to do an insincere, self-serving commentary about the holiday and how society treats the poor and needy; during his live commentary, he interviews Bart, who claims he's homeless and "didn't apologize." Homer and Marge see the report and call the police, admitting to officers their fear that they may have been too harsh with Bart.

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It is It's Thanksgiving Day, and Homer is watching Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade on TV. Lisa is meticulously assembling a centerpiece to place on the family dinner table (with a little help from Maggie), while Marge is busy cooking and preparing for the guests: Patty, Selma, Jacqueline and Grampa. Bart is basically getting in everyone's way. Later, as the guests assemble at the table, Lisa brings in the centerpiece and proudly shows it off, just as Bart brings in the turkey. When Bart tries to jockey for position in placing the turkey platter, he gets into an argument with Lisa about where her centerpiece should be set, resulting in a fight and, in the middle of the ruckus, the centerpiece lands inside the fireplace and instantly is destroyed in the flames. Lisa is devastated and runs to her room in tears, while Bart refuses to accept responsibility. An angry Marge—with Homer, in a rare move, backing her up—sends Bart to his room without dinner, and declares declaring that because of him, "you ruined Thanksgiving!"

Bart is told that if he can legitimately apologize and mean it, apologize, he will be allowed to dinner, but a stubborn Bart is convinced that he has done nothing wrong and that Lisa was to blame. Scoffing at the directive and thinking he doesn't have to take his punishment, Bart decides he's going to show his family a thing or two by running away. Santa's Little Helper, who had been thrown out of the house, decides to join Bart as they wander through town. Bart first stops at a house that happens to be Mr. Burns' mansion, where he tries to swipe a freshly baked pie but is run off by Burns' bloodthirsty hounds. Later, after donating plasma at a local paid-donor blood bank (that happened to be open on Thanksgiving Day) for $12 cash, Bart passes out on the streets in a run-down part of Springfield. When he awakens is awakens, he's greeted by two street bums who bring him to a community Thanksgiving dinner for the less fortunate. There, Kent Brockman is preparing to do an insincere, self-serving commentary about the holiday and how society treats the poor and needy; during his live commentary, he interviews Bart, who claims he's homeless and "didn't apologize." Homer and Marge see the report and call the police, admitting to officers their fear that they may have been too harsh with Bart.



Upon returning home, he starts to go inside but reconsiders after envisioning his family blaming him for everything. Instead, he climbs onto the roof to try to sort out his feelings. But when he hears Lisa crying in her room and conceding defeat, Bart invites her to join him on the roof. After some initial struggle, he feels remorse for destroying Lisa's centerpiece and finally apologizes. Homer and Marge, overhearing the conversation, are relieved that all is okay between the two, and the Thanksgiving holiday at the Simpsons is saved. The episode ends with the family enjoying leftovers in the kitchen, with Homer thanking God for giving them "one more crack at togetherness."

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Upon returning home, he starts to go inside but reconsiders after envisioning his family rejecting his apology and blaming him for everything. Instead, he climbs onto the roof to try to sort out his feelings. But when he hears Lisa crying in her room and conceding defeat, Bart invites her to join him on the roof. After some initial struggle, he feels remorse for destroying Lisa's centerpiece and finally apologizes. Homer and Marge, overhearing the conversation, are relieved that all is okay between the two, and the Thanksgiving holiday at the Simpsons is saved. The episode ends with the family enjoying leftovers in the kitchen, with Homer thanking God for giving them "one more crack at togetherness."


* JerkassHasAPoint: While Homer and Marge went too far in punishing Bart and declaring that "he ruined Thanksgiving" [[WasTooHardOnHim regretful or not,]] Bart did throw the centerpiece in the fireplace on purpose and without any remorse. Along with the fact that Marge has to deal with her sisters, her mother, and father-in-law, not to mention the preparation of the feast itself. One's patience can only go so far, especially if one has Bart for a child.

to:

* JerkassHasAPoint: While Homer and Marge went too far in punishing Bart and declaring that "he ruined Thanksgiving" [[WasTooHardOnHim regretful or not,]] Bart did throw the centerpiece in the fireplace on purpose and without any remorse. Along with the fact that that, Marge has to deal with her sisters, her mother, and father-in-law, not to mention the preparation of the feast itself. One's patience can only go so far, especially if one has Bart for a child.


* JerkassHasAPoint: While Homer and Marge went too far for punishing Bart and declaring that "he ruined Thanksgiving" [[WasTooHardOnHim regretful or not,]] Bart did throw the centerpiece in the fireplace on purpose and without any remorse. Along with the fact that Marge has to deal with her sisters, her mother, and father-in-law, not to mention the preparation of the feast itself. One's patience can only go so far, especially if one has Bart for a child.

to:

* JerkassHasAPoint: While Homer and Marge went too far for in punishing Bart and declaring that "he ruined Thanksgiving" [[WasTooHardOnHim regretful or not,]] Bart did throw the centerpiece in the fireplace on purpose and without any remorse. Along with the fact that Marge has to deal with her sisters, her mother, and father-in-law, not to mention the preparation of the feast itself. One's patience can only go so far, especially if one has Bart for a child.


** While it was rather harsh for Marge for declaring Bart that he ruined Thanksgiving, Marge was at her wit's end from dealing with her sisters, her mother, and her father-in-law, and the preparation for the feast itself. One can't be too hard on her, especially when her son is Bart.

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** While it was rather harsh for of Marge for declaring to tell Bart that he ruined Thanksgiving, Marge was at her wit's end from dealing with her sisters, her mother, and her father-in-law, and the preparation for the feast itself. One can't be too hard on her, especially when her son is Bart.

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