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* GriefSong: One word. ''Elegia''.
* InTheStyleOf: The music video for "The Perfect Kiss", directed by Creator/JonathanDemme, is a straight PerformanceVideo done in the same manner as ''Film/StopMakingSense'', the Demme-directed Music/TalkingHeads concert film from the previous year.

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* GriefSong: One word. ''Elegia''.
"Elegia", dedicated to the late [[Music/JoyDivision Ian Curtis]].
* InTheStyleOf: InTheStyleOf:
** "Sunrise" is a noticeable pastiche of Music/TheCure's GothRock style, which the members of New Order had previously pioneered as Music/JoyDivision.
**
The music video for "The Perfect Kiss", directed by Creator/JonathanDemme, is a straight PerformanceVideo done in the same manner as ''Film/StopMakingSense'', the Demme-directed Music/TalkingHeads concert film from the previous year.

Added DiffLines:

* InTheStyleOf: The music video for "The Perfect Kiss", directed by Creator/JonathanDemme, is a straight PerformanceVideo done in the same manner as ''Film/StopMakingSense'', the Demme-directed Music/TalkingHeads concert film from the previous year.


Added DiffLines:

* PerformanceVideo: "The Perfect Kiss", which notably features the band performing live (in the studio) due to Bernard Sumner's refusal to lip-sync.


* CallBack: "Face Up" features the phrase "can you see your own dark face/it's dying in a lonely place," apparently referring to the BSide of the 1981 "Ceremony" single, "In a Lonely Place".

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* CallBack: CallBack:
**
"Face Up" features the phrase "can you see your own dark face/it's dying in a lonely place," apparently referring to the BSide of the 1981 "Ceremony" single, "In a Lonely Place".Place".
** The video for "The Perfect Kiss" has a Music/JoyDivision poster hanging in the background.


This was the first album released under the band's U.S. deal with Quincy Jones' Creator/WarnerBrosRecords-distributed Qwest label, giving the band much more American exposure than before. While the band had had earlier success on the dance charts, having some major label clout allowed the album to be the first to make the Billboard charts, peaking at no. 94. Qwest would later reissue the band's earlier material as well as Music/JoyDivision's albums, which had previously been handled by Factory US and distributed by fellow indie label Rough Trade.

to:

This was the first album released under the band's U.S. deal with Quincy Jones' Creator/WarnerBrosRecords-distributed Qwest label, giving the band much more American exposure than before. While the band had had earlier success on the dance charts, having some major label clout distribution allowed the album to be the first to make the Billboard charts, peaking at no. 94. Qwest would later reissue the band's earlier material as well as Music/JoyDivision's albums, which had previously been handled by Factory US and distributed by fellow indie label Rough Trade.

Added DiffLines:

* GriefSong: One word. ''Elegia''.


!!"One of these days, you'll go back to your trope; you won't even notice that you are alone":

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!!"One of these days, you'll go trope back to your trope; home; you won't even notice that you are alone":


Notably, this was the first of New Order's albums to have some of its songs released as singles; previously, Music/JoyDivision and New Order singles were recorded and released independently of studio albums.[[note]]"She's Lost Control" from ''Music/UnknownPleasures'' '''was''' included as the BSide to the "Atmosphere" single in 1980, but the version there was a more electronically-driven re-recording. The last non-album single New Order recorded was "World in Motion" in 1990.[[/note]] For ''Low-Life'', "The Perfect Kiss" and "Sub-Culture" were released as both 7" and 12" singles, with the 12" ones containing extended versions of the songs. Specifically, the 12" release of "The Perfect Kiss" features it in its unedited format, clocking in at 8:46 compared to the album version's 4:51, while "Sub-Culture" received a club mix by American record producer John Robie.

to:

Notably, this was the first of New Order's albums to have some of its songs released as singles; previously, Music/JoyDivision and New Order singles were recorded and released independently of studio albums.[[note]]"She's Lost Control" from ''Music/UnknownPleasures'' '''was''' included as the BSide to the "Atmosphere" single in 1980, but the version there was a more electronically-driven re-recording. The last true non-album single New Order recorded was "World in Motion" in 1990.1990, and the last single of theirs not based on a song from a proper New Order studio album was [[Film/TwentyFourHourPartyPeople "Here to Stay"]] in 2002.[[/note]] For ''Low-Life'', "The Perfect Kiss" and "Sub-Culture" were released as both 7" and 12" singles, with the 12" ones containing extended versions of the songs. Specifically, the 12" release of "The Perfect Kiss" features it in its unedited format, clocking in at 8:46 compared to the album version's 4:51, while "Sub-Culture" received a club mix by American record producer John Robie.


Notably, this was the first of New Order's albums to have some of its songs released as singles; previously, Music/JoyDivision and New Order singles were recorded and released independently of studio albums.[[note]]"She's Lost Control" from ''Music/UnknownPleasures'' '''was''' included as the BSide to the "Atmosphere" single in 1980, but the version there was a more electronically-driven re-recording.[[/note]] For ''Low-Life'', "The Perfect Kiss" and "Sub-Culture" were released as both 7" and 12" singles, with the 12" ones containing extended versions of the songs. Specifically, the 12" release of "The Perfect Kiss" features it in its unedited format, clocking in at 8:46 compared to the album version's 4:51, while "Sub-Culture" received a club mix by American record producer John Robie.

to:

Notably, this was the first of New Order's albums to have some of its songs released as singles; previously, Music/JoyDivision and New Order singles were recorded and released independently of studio albums.[[note]]"She's Lost Control" from ''Music/UnknownPleasures'' '''was''' included as the BSide to the "Atmosphere" single in 1980, but the version there was a more electronically-driven re-recording. The last non-album single New Order recorded was "World in Motion" in 1990.[[/note]] For ''Low-Life'', "The Perfect Kiss" and "Sub-Culture" were released as both 7" and 12" singles, with the 12" ones containing extended versions of the songs. Specifically, the 12" release of "The Perfect Kiss" features it in its unedited format, clocking in at 8:46 compared to the album version's 4:51, while "Sub-Culture" received a club mix by American record producer John Robie.


* ChangedForTheVideo: The music video for "The Perfect Kiss", directed by Creator/JonathanDemme, featured a live version, as the band refused to lip-sync.

to:

* ChangedForTheVideo: The music video for "The Perfect Kiss", directed by Creator/JonathanDemme, featured a live version, as the band refused to lip-sync. It's still faithful to the 12-inch version.


This was the first album released under the band's U.S. deal with the Quincy Jones' Creator/WarnerBrosRecords-distributed Qwest label, giving the band much more American exposure than before. While the band had had earlier success on the dance charts, having some major label clout allowed the album to be the first to make the Billboard charts, peaking at no. 94. Qwest would later reissue the band's earlier material as well as Music/JoyDivision's albums, which had previously been handled by Factory US and distributed by fellow indie label Rough Trade.

to:

This was the first album released under the band's U.S. deal with the Quincy Jones' Creator/WarnerBrosRecords-distributed Qwest label, giving the band much more American exposure than before. While the band had had earlier success on the dance charts, having some major label clout allowed the album to be the first to make the Billboard charts, peaking at no. 94. Qwest would later reissue the band's earlier material as well as Music/JoyDivision's albums, which had previously been handled by Factory US and distributed by fellow indie label Rough Trade.


This was the first album released under the band's U.S. deal with the Quincy Jones' Creator/WarnerBrosRecords-distributed Qwest label, giving the band much more American exposure than before. While the band had had earlier success on the dance charts, having some major label clout allowed the album to be the first to make the Billboard charts, peaking at no. 94. (Qwest would later reissue the band's earlier material as well as Music/JoyDivision's albums. which had been handled by Factory US, distributed by Rough Trade.)

to:

This was the first album released under the band's U.S. deal with the Quincy Jones' Creator/WarnerBrosRecords-distributed Qwest label, giving the band much more American exposure than before. While the band had had earlier success on the dance charts, having some major label clout allowed the album to be the first to make the Billboard charts, peaking at no. 94. (Qwest Qwest would later reissue the band's earlier material as well as Music/JoyDivision's albums. albums, which had previously been handled by Factory US, US and distributed by fellow indie label Rough Trade.)
Trade.

Added DiffLines:

* ChangedForTheVideo: The music video for "The Perfect Kiss", directed by Creator/JonathanDemme, featured a live version, as the band refused to lip-sync.


This was the first album released under the band's U.S. deal with the Quincy Jones' Creator/WarnerBrosRecords-distributed Qwest label, giving the band much more American exposure than before. Having some major label clout allowed it to be the first New Order album to make the Billboard charts, peaking at no. 94. (Qwest would later reissue the band's earlier material as well as Music/JoyDivision's albums. which had been handled by Factory US, distributed by Rough Trade.)

to:

This was the first album released under the band's U.S. deal with the Quincy Jones' Creator/WarnerBrosRecords-distributed Qwest label, giving the band much more American exposure than before. Having While the band had had earlier success on the dance charts, having some major label clout allowed it the album to be the first New Order album to make the Billboard charts, peaking at no. 94. (Qwest would later reissue the band's earlier material as well as Music/JoyDivision's albums. which had been handled by Factory US, distributed by Rough Trade.)


''Low-Life'' is the third album by Music/NewOrder. Released in 1985, the album further explores the mix of PostPunk and SynthPop featured on ''Music/PowerCorruptionAndLies'' and its surrounding singles, bringing New Order into their signature brand of AlternativeDance (after having [[TropeMaker singlehandedly invented the genre]] with their single "Temptation" two years prior).

to:

''Low-Life'' is the third album by Music/NewOrder. Released in 1985, the album further explores the mix of PostPunk and SynthPop featured on ''Music/PowerCorruptionAndLies'' and its surrounding singles, bringing New Order into their signature brand of AlternativeDance (after having [[TropeMaker singlehandedly invented the genre]] with their single "Temptation" two three years prior).


* ADateWithRosiePalms: At one point in "The Perfect Kiss", the narrator states that he should've just engaged in this instead of joining his visibly unstable friend for a night out.



* EpicRocking: "Sunrise" clocks in at 6:01. The 12" versions of "The Perfect Kiss" and "Sub-Culture" are also pretty lengthy, clocking in at 8:47 and 7:26, respectively. "Elegia" was infamous for being ''nearly 18 minutes'' but was cut for the four minutes for the studio album.

to:

* EpicRocking: "Sunrise" clocks in at 6:01. The 12" versions of "The Perfect Kiss" and "Sub-Culture" are also pretty lengthy, clocking in at 8:47 and 7:26, respectively. "Elegia" was infamous for being ''nearly 18 minutes'' but was before being cut for the four minutes down to just under five for the studio album.

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