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* Many early computers used analog rather than digital values, ''completely'' averting this in real life. Analog computers still see some uses, but have major limitations for general purpose computing compared to digital (chief among them being that analog computations are neither exact nor reproducible: they can give results that are ''good enough'', but never absolutely perfect).

to:

* Many early computers used analog rather than digital values, ''completely'' averting this in real life. Analog computers still see some uses, but have major limitations for general purpose computing compared to digital (chief among them being that analog computations are neither exact nor reproducible: they can give results that are ''good enough'', but never absolutely perfect).perfect; further, reprogramming one typically involves altering the hardware).


* Described as the foundation of the Digimon World in ''Manga/DigimonVTamer01'' and something of an arc number, first brought up by Lord [=HolyAngemon=] when Taichi and Zero explain their combination and 100% win record to him. Well actually first brought up in the work's title. The guardian of the net Ocean and the Jijimon from Hospitown can analyze and make sense of any given object's 0-1 arrangement, Demon can manipulate the arrangements to inconsistent degrees, Arkadimon breaks them apart then eats them and so on.

to:

* Described as the foundation of the Digimon World in ''Manga/DigimonVTamer01'' and something of an arc number, number. Besides showing up in the title, Taichi and Zero symbolically represent the numbers with Taichi's name including "ichi", meaning "one", and Zero being SelfExplanatory. It's first brought up in-story by Lord [=HolyAngemon=] when Taichi and Zero explain their combination and 100% win record to him. Well actually first brought up in the work's title. The guardian of the net Net Ocean and the Jijimon from Hospitown can analyze and make sense of any given object's 0-1 arrangement, Demon can manipulate the arrangements to inconsistent degrees, Arkadimon breaks them apart then eats them and so on.



* [[http://www.philosophicalturn.net/Cartoons/Foxtrot_binary.jpg This]] ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' comic.
** Another old one had Jason and his friend discuss various sites and referring to them by their IP adresses rather than proper DNS (Domain Name Space). This is treated as them being exceptionally computer-savvy, rather than being obnoxious and needlessly overcomplicating.

to:

* [[http://www.philosophicalturn.net/Cartoons/Foxtrot_binary.jpg This]] An old ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' comic.
** Another old one
strip had Jason and his friend discuss various sites and referring to them by their IP adresses rather than proper DNS (Domain Name Space). This is treated as them being exceptionally computer-savvy, rather than being yet also obnoxious and needlessly overcomplicating.


Added DiffLines:

* Referenced in ''Series/KamenRiderZeroOne'', as the main character adopts the codename of "Zero-One" in a series that deals with the concept of artificial intelligence. Zeroes and Ones are occasionally also seen as a visual representation of data being transferred in cyberspace.


[[folder]]
* Used by comedian Rufus Hound about Brian Cox in the "Dinosaurs" episode of ''Radio/TheInfinityMonkeyCage'':

to:

[[folder]]
[[folder: Radio]]
* Used by comedian Rufus Hound about Brian Cox in the "Dinosaurs" episode of ''Radio/TheInfinityMonkeyCage'':''Radio/TheInfiniteMonkeyCage'':

Added DiffLines:

[[folder]]
* Used by comedian Rufus Hound about Brian Cox in the "Dinosaurs" episode of ''Radio/TheInfinityMonkeyCage'':
-->'''Rufus''': The Brian Cox pitch, ultimately, is "Wow! Look at that!" And when you do it you're talking about, you know, red dwarfs and event horizons, and so your "Wow!" exists as a series of ones and zeroes that are rolling in your almost human head. But for normal people, we only ''really'' get that when we can touch it, or lick it.
[[/folder]]

Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheBatman'': In "Artifacts", roughly a thousand years after Batman's time, people find the Batcave and try to find clues on how to defeat the immortal Mr. Freeze. Batman's computer has degraded beyond use, but they discover binary code etched into the titanium walls, that when translated becomes all of Batman's data.


"A computer sees everything as a series of zeroes and ones." is true, but only in the same way as "a human sees everything as a matrix of hues and intensities" or "a dog is composed entirely of protons, neutrons, and electrons": it's technically correct, but not really meaningful in terms of interacting with the computer. The level at which a computer deals with "zeroes and ones" is the level of digital electronics, a level which is so far below the level at which you operate on the computer that it's actually comparatively ''difficult'' to deal with zeroes and ones directly . Even the most fundamental operations on a computer almost always deal with blocks of 8, 16, 32, or 64 of these zeroes and ones at a time. A simple computer circuit that adds two numbers and shows the result in two displays, will involve at least 7 basic integrated circuits and an insane amount of wiring. Modern circuitry is billions of times more complex, and the industry uses special hardware-description languages, such as VHDL, to automate the daunting task of designing such integrated circuits from scratch.

to:

"A computer sees everything as a series of zeroes and ones." is true, but only in the same way as "a human sees everything as a matrix of hues and intensities" or "a dog is composed entirely of protons, neutrons, and electrons": it's technically correct, but not really meaningful in terms of interacting with the computer. The level at which a computer deals with "zeroes and ones" is the level of digital electronics, a level which is so far below the level at which you operate on the computer that it's actually comparatively ''difficult'' to deal with zeroes and ones directly .directly. Even the most fundamental operations on a computer almost always deal with blocks of 8, 16, 32, or 64 of these zeroes and ones at a time. A simple computer circuit that adds two numbers and shows the result in two displays, will involve at least 7 basic integrated circuits and an insane amount of wiring. Modern circuitry is billions of times more complex, and the industry uses special hardware-description languages, such as VHDL, to automate the daunting task of designing such integrated circuits from scratch.


* The ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' episode "A Virtual Murder" used the same concept as the TNG episode above, only instead of computer-like aliens, it's apparently regular human computer programmers who think like this. "One or zero", [[MotiveRant the murderer says at the end]], "I swore a long time ago I'd never live in that grey world in between. It's got to be all, or nothing!"

to:

* The ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' episode "A Virtual Murder" used the same concept as the TNG episode above, below, only instead of computer-like aliens, it's apparently regular human computer programmers who think like this. "One or zero", [[MotiveRant the murderer says at the end]], "I swore a long time ago I'd never live in that grey world in between. It's got to be all, or nothing!"


* Wally from ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' invoked this when he was accused of abusing the company Internet to look at porn. He responded that all he downloaded was a series of harmless zeroes and ones -- the people at IT who intercepted his traffic were the ones who "activated" those zeroes and ones and turned them into naughty pictures, so ''they'' should be fired. Needless to say, nobody was fooled.
** Another [[http://dilbert.com/strip/1992-09-08 Dilbert]] had an old programmer, Dilbert and Wally sitting at the lunch table. The man says, "When I started programming, we didn't have any of these sissy 'icons' and 'windows.' All we had were zeros and ones -- and sometimes we didn't even have ones. I wrote an entire database program using only zeros." Dilbert replies, "You had zeros? We had to use the letter 'O.'"



* Wally from ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' invoked this when he was accused of abusing the company Internet to look at porn. He responded that all he downloaded was a series of harmless zeroes and ones -- the people at IT who intercepted his traffic were the ones who "activated" those zeroes and ones and turned them into naughty pictures, so ''they'' should be fired. Needless to say, nobody was fooled.
** Another [[http://dilbert.com/strip/1992-09-08 Dilbert]] had an old programmer, Dilbert and Wally sitting at the lunch table. The man says, "When I started programming, we didn't have any of these sissy 'icons' and 'windows.' All we had were zeros and ones -- and sometimes we didn't even have ones. I wrote an entire database program using only zeros." Dilbert replies, "You had zeros? We had to use the letter 'O.'"



[[folder:Fan Works]]
* Pops up in ''WebVideo/SwordArtOnlineAbridged'' when Kirito tries to explain to [[HopelessWithTech Asuna]] why they can't literally split the BadassLongcoat that dropped from a boss they just beat.
-->'''Kirito:''' It's not fabric I can cut, it's a bunch of ones and zeroes.\\
'''Asuna:''' [[LiteralMinded Fine, then give me the ones.]]\\
'''Kirito:''' [[StrangeMindsThinkAlike Fuck you, I want the ones!]]
[[/folder]]



* ''Film/{{Tron}}'' has the Bit, who acted as a sidekick to the hero and could only say "yes" or "no" (with a corresponding shape-change). Though technically It also assumes a neutral state when not responding to a question, which should qualify it as a trit.



* ''Film/ReadyPlayerOne2018'': Naturally for a movie where a big chunk of the action happen in {{Cyberspace}}, this imagery comes up. Especially with Innovative Online Industries, which acronym "IOI" is [[SigilSpam used everywhere]], styled as to look like "101", and melded into blocks of zeroes and ones in their advertisements/communications.

to:

* ''Film/ReadyPlayerOne2018'': ''Film/{{Ready Player One|2018}}'': Naturally for a movie where a big chunk of the action happen in {{Cyberspace}}, this imagery comes up. Especially with Innovative Online Industries, which acronym "IOI" is [[SigilSpam used everywhere]], styled as to look like "101", and melded into blocks of zeroes and ones in their advertisements/communications.advertisements/communications.
* ''Film/{{Tron}}'' has the Bit, who acted as a sidekick to the hero and could only say "yes" or "no" (with a corresponding shape-change). Though technically It also assumes a neutral state when not responding to a question, which should qualify it as a trit.



* The ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' episode "A Virtual Murder" used the same concept as the TNG episode above, only instead of computer-like aliens, it's apparently regular human computer programmers who think like this. "One or zero", [[MotiveRant the murderer says at the end]], "I swore a long time ago I'd never live in that grey world in between. It's got to be all, or nothing!"
* Joe on ''Series/NewsRadio'' once claimed to be able to read binary. In one episode, he reads Dave's letter on his computer, which had broken and was only showing things in binary format.



* Joe on ''Series/NewsRadio'' once claimed to be able to read binary. In one episode, he reads Dave's letter on his computer, which had broken and was only showing things in binary format.
* The ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' episode "A Virtual Murder" used the same concept as the TNG episode above, only instead of computer-like aliens, it's apparently regular human computer programmers who think like this. "One or zero", [[MotiveRant the murderer says at the end]], "I swore a long time ago I'd never live in that grey world in between. It's got to be all, or nothing!"



* In the song "Fibonacci Sequence" by the net-famous musician Music/DoctorSteel. "All our gods and heroes / are only ones and zeroes."



* "Brothers of the [[Franchise/AssassinsCreed Creed]]" by Miracle of Sound. "Zeroes and ones I bleed, we're [[TitleDrop brothers of the Creed]]."
* "And all we ever were, just zeroes and ones" from "Zero-Sum" by Music/NineInchNails.
* The trope name itself is the very last line in Music/RiloKiley's "Science vs. Romance".



* In the song "Fibonacci Sequence" by the net-famous musician ''Music/DoctorSteel''. "All our gods and heroes / are only ones and zeroes."
* "And all we ever were, just zeroes and ones" from "Zero-Sum" by Music/NineInchNails.
* The trope name itself is the very last line in Music/RiloKiley's "Science vs. Romance".
* "Brothers of the [[Franchise/AssassinsCreed Creed]]" by Miracle of Sound. "Zeroes and ones I bleed, we're [[TitleDrop brothers of the Creed]]."



* The videoGame sequel to ''Film/{{Tron}}'', ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' introduced Byte: although Jet initially thinks he's a Bit, Byte gets indignant and says that he's eight times smarter than any simple Bit. Ironically, this statement betrays the comprehension gap that leads to this trope: a byte is composed of eight bits, but has eight ''orders of magnitude'' greater capacity. If Byte played by the same rules as Bit, he'd be able to say 256 distinct things.



* The video game sequel to ''Film/{{Tron}}'', ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' introduced Byte: although Jet initially thinks he's a Bit, Byte gets indignant and says that he's eight times smarter than any simple Bit. Ironically, this statement betrays the comprehension gap that leads to this trope: a byte is composed of eight bits, but has eight ''orders of magnitude'' greater capacity. If Byte played by the same rules as Bit, he'd be able to say 256 distinct things.



* ''{{Webcomic/Narbonic}}'' has [[http://www.webcomicsnation.com/shaenongarrity/narbonic_plus/series.php?view=archive&chapter=36058#strip4 this strip]], in which Helen (normally a biologist) has been infected with computer geekdom.



* ''{{Webcomic/Narbonic}}'' has [[http://www.webcomicsnation.com/shaenongarrity/narbonic_plus/series.php?view=archive&chapter=36058#strip4 this strip]], in which Helen (normally a biologist) has been infected with computer geekdom.



* ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' has an entire race of people, called Binomes, which are anthropomorphic zeroes and ones who can speak in binary. In one episode, a binome tells a joke in ones and zeroes, which, in this case, is actually a roundabout [[BilingualBonus substitution cipher]]: if you translate the ones and zeroes into decimal numbers, then the decimal numbers into letters, it becomes "[[OrphanedPunchline Take my wife, please!]]"

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' has an entire race In the ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' episode "Guardians of people, called Binomes, which are anthropomorphic Sunshine", when Finn and Jake teleport into the video game, Finn is mesmerized by his leg being made up of numbers.
-->'''Finn:''' My leg is math!
* In ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'',
zeroes and ones who can speak are constantly filling up blue squares inside the Lyoko Towers, within the tunnels between the sectors, or over the surface of the Celestial Dome in binary. Sector 5.
*
In one episode, ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode a binome tells a joke in ones and zeroes, which, in this case, is actually a roundabout [[BilingualBonus substitution cipher]]: if you translate professor demonstrated the ones and concept of binary language via a scene from ''The Miracle Worker'' done in zeroes into decimal numbers, then the decimal numbers into letters, it becomes "[[OrphanedPunchline Take my wife, please!]]"and ones. Anne Sullivan tries to teach deaf and blind Helen Keller to say "water".
-->'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one, one zero, one zero, zero one.\\
'''Helen Keller:''' [incomprehensible gibberish]\\
'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one, one zero, one zero, zero one!\\
'''Helen Keller:''' [garbled repetition of binary phrase]\\
'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one! Zero one!



* In ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', zeroes and ones are constantly filling up blue squares inside the Lyoko Towers, within the tunnels between the sectors, or over the surface of the Celestial Dome in Sector 5.
* In one ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode a professor demonstrated the concept of binary language via a scene from ''The Miracle Worker'' done in zeroes and ones. Anne Sullivan tries to teach deaf & blind Helen Keller to say "water".
-->'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one, one zero, one zero, zero one.\\
'''Helen Keller:''' [incomprehensible gibberish]\\
'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one, one zero, one zero, zero one!\\
'''Helen Keller:''' [garbled repetition of binary phrase]\\
'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one! Zero one!
* In the ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' episode "Guardians of Sunshine", when Finn and Jake teleport into the video game, Finn is mesmerized by his leg being made up of numbers.
-->'''Finn:''' My leg is math!

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' has an entire race of people, called Binomes, which are anthropomorphic zeroes and ones are constantly filling up blue squares inside the Lyoko Towers, within the tunnels between the sectors, or over the surface of the Celestial Dome who can speak in Sector 5.
*
binary. In one ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode episode, a professor demonstrated binome tells a joke in ones and zeroes, which, in this case, is actually a roundabout [[BilingualBonus substitution cipher]]: if you translate the concept of binary language via a scene from ''The Miracle Worker'' done in ones and zeroes and ones. Anne Sullivan tries to teach deaf & blind Helen Keller to say "water".
-->'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one, one zero, one zero, zero one.\\
'''Helen Keller:''' [incomprehensible gibberish]\\
'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one, one zero, one zero, zero one!\\
'''Helen Keller:''' [garbled repetition of binary phrase]\\
'''Annie Sullivan:''' Zero one! Zero one!
* In the ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' episode "Guardians of Sunshine", when Finn and Jake teleport
into decimal numbers, then the video game, Finn is mesmerized by his leg being made up of numbers.
-->'''Finn:''' My leg is math!
decimal numbers into letters, it becomes "[[OrphanedPunchline Take my wife, please!]]"


* Angus in ''VideoGames/NightInTheWoods'' brings this up, but goes on to say the universe is made of atoms and our perceptions of reality are chemical reactions--meaning that everything can be simplified to the point of erasing all meaning.

to:

* Angus in ''VideoGames/NightInTheWoods'' ''VideoGame/NightInTheWoods'' brings this up, but goes on to say the universe is made of atoms and our perceptions of reality are chemical reactions--meaning that everything can be simplified to the point of erasing all meaning.


!!Examples

to:

!!Examples
!!Examples:






[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* [[http://www.philosophicalturn.net/Cartoons/Foxtrot_binary.jpg This]] ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' comic.
** Another old one had Jason and his friend discuss various sites and referring to them by their IP adresses rather than proper DNS (Domain Name Space). This is treated as them being exceptionally computer-savvy, rather than being obnoxious and needlessly overcomplicating.
* Wally from ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' invoked this when he was accused of abusing the company Internet to look at porn. He responded that all he downloaded was a series of harmless zeroes and ones -- the people at IT who intercepted his traffic were the ones who "activated" those zeroes and ones and turned them into naughty pictures, so ''they'' should be fired. Needless to say, nobody was fooled.
** Another [[http://dilbert.com/strip/1992-09-08 Dilbert]] had an old programmer, Dilbert and Wally sitting at the lunch table. The man says, "When I started programming, we didn't have any of these sissy 'icons' and 'windows.' All we had were zeros and ones -- and sometimes we didn't even have ones. I wrote an entire database program using only zeros." Dilbert replies, "You had zeros? We had to use the letter 'O.'"
[[/folder]]



* ''{{Film/Tron}}'' has the Bit, who acted as a sidekick to the hero and could only say "yes" or "no" (with a corresponding shape-change). Though technically It also assumes a neutral state when not responding to a question, which should qualify it as a trit.

to:

* ''{{Film/Tron}}'' ''Film/{{Tron}}'' has the Bit, who acted as a sidekick to the hero and could only say "yes" or "no" (with a corresponding shape-change). Though technically It also assumes a neutral state when not responding to a question, which should qualify it as a trit.



* ''Film/ReadyPlayerOne2018'': Naturally for a movie where a big chunk of the action happen in {{Cyberspace}}, this imagery comes up. Especially with Innovative Online Industries, which acronym "IOI" is [[SigilSpam used everywhere]], styled as to look like "101", and melded into blocks of zeroes and ones in their advertisements/communications.



* In the ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' episode "The Intruder", the computer monitor behind Hermiod displayed ''Film/TheMatrix''-style scrolling columns... consisting entirely of the digits "0" and "1". You'd think the United States military would build something more sensible than that, given their supposed fondness of [[ViewerFriendlyInterface viewer-friendly interfaces]].
** It's worse than that, after staring at the scrolling numbers for a few seconds [=McKay=] immediately deduced that he was looking at a virus. He then went on to press a few buttons and translate the binary into Wraith, somehow confirming that the Wraith must have been the ones to write it. ([[FridgeBrilliance Maybe he can recognize common bit patterns from the Wraith's character encoding standard?]])

to:

* In the ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' episode "The Intruder", the computer monitor behind Hermiod displayed ''Film/TheMatrix''-style scrolling columns... consisting entirely of the digits "0" and "1". You'd think the United States military would build something more sensible than that, given their supposed fondness of [[ViewerFriendlyInterface viewer-friendly interfaces]].
**
interfaces]]. It's worse than that, after staring at the scrolling numbers for a few seconds [=McKay=] immediately deduced that he was looking at a virus. He then went on to press a few buttons and translate the binary into Wraith, somehow confirming that the Wraith must have been the ones to write it. ([[FridgeBrilliance Maybe he can recognize common bit patterns from the Wraith's character encoding standard?]])



[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* [[http://www.philosophicalturn.net/Cartoons/Foxtrot_binary.jpg This]] ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' comic.
** Another old one had Jason and his friend discuss various sites and referring to them by their IP adresses rather than proper DNS (Domain Name Space). This is treated as them being exceptionally computer-savvy, rather than being obnoxious and needlessly overcomplicating.
* Wally from ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' invoked this when he was accused of abusing the company Internet to look at porn. He responded that all he downloaded was a series of harmless zeroes and ones -- the people at IT who intercepted his traffic were the ones who "activated" those zeroes and ones and turned them into naughty pictures, so ''they'' should be fired. Needless to say, nobody was fooled.
** Another [[http://dilbert.com/strip/1992-09-08 Dilbert]] had an old programmer, Dilbert and Wally sitting at the lunch table. The man says, "When I started programming, we didn't have any of these sissy 'icons' and 'windows.' All we had were zeros and ones -- and sometimes we didn't even have ones. I wrote an entire database program using only zeros." Dilbert replies, "You had zeros? We had to use the letter 'O.'"
[[/folder]]



* ''ReBoot'' has an entire race of people, called Binomes, which are anthropomorphic zeroes and ones who can speak in binary. In one episode, a binome tells a joke in ones and zeroes, which, in this case, is actually a roundabout [[BilingualBonus substitution cipher]]: if you translate the ones and zeroes into decimal numbers, then the decimal numbers into letters, it becomes "[[OrphanedPunchline Take my wife, please!]]"

to:

* ''ReBoot'' ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' has an entire race of people, called Binomes, which are anthropomorphic zeroes and ones who can speak in binary. In one episode, a binome tells a joke in ones and zeroes, which, in this case, is actually a roundabout [[BilingualBonus substitution cipher]]: if you translate the ones and zeroes into decimal numbers, then the decimal numbers into letters, it becomes "[[OrphanedPunchline Take my wife, please!]]"



* In the WesternAnimation/AdventureTime episode "Guardians of Sunshine", when Finn and Jake teleport into the video game, Finn is mesmerized by his leg being made up of numbers.
-->'''Finn:''' My leg is math!\\

to:

* In the WesternAnimation/AdventureTime ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' episode "Guardians of Sunshine", when Finn and Jake teleport into the video game, Finn is mesmerized by his leg being made up of numbers.
-->'''Finn:''' My leg is math!\\math!


* ''Mage: The Ascension'' had Virtual Adepts' trinary decks. They were described as the next step in the technomagic, and able to say, here I quote "In a stiff computer world of "yes" or "no", trinary decks are able to say "Well... maybe".".
** This has a vague resemblance to the Boolean logic concept called "null". True and false basically boil down to yes and no, while null pretty much means "not applicable" or "no value" or "unknown". This corresponds a bit to the Chinese zen concept of wú, a.k.a. mu.
** It also resembles fuzzy logic, which pretty much corresponds to shades of gray.

to:

* ''Mage: The Ascension'' had Virtual Adepts' trinary decks. They were described as the next step in the technomagic, and able to say, here I quote technomagic "In a stiff computer world of "yes" or "no", trinary decks are able to say "Well... maybe".".
** This
". Which is, of course, totally absurd to anyone who has used a vague resemblance to the Boolean logic concept called "null". True computer and false basically boil down to yes and no, while null pretty much means "not applicable" or "no value" or "unknown". This corresponds a bit to the Chinese zen concept of wú, a.k.a. mu.
** It also resembles fuzzy logic, which pretty much corresponds to shades of gray.
noticed that it can deal with, for instance, more than two colors.


* ''{{Tron}}'' has the Bit, who acted as a sidekick to the hero and could only say "yes" or "no" (with a corresponding shape-change). Though technically It also assumes a neutral state when not responding to a question, which should qualify it as a trit.

to:

* ''{{Tron}}'' ''{{Film/Tron}}'' has the Bit, who acted as a sidekick to the hero and could only say "yes" or "no" (with a corresponding shape-change). Though technically It also assumes a neutral state when not responding to a question, which should qualify it as a trit.



* The videogame sequel to ''Film/{{Tron}}'', ''[[VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh Tron 2.0]]'' introduced Byte: although Jet initially thinks he's a Bit, Byte gets indignant and says that he's eight times smarter than any simple Bit. Ironically, this statement betrays the comprehension gap that leads to this trope: a byte is composed of eight bits, but has eight ''orders of magnitude'' greater capacity. If Byte played by the same rules as Bit, he'd be able to say 256 distinct things.

to:

* The videogame videoGame sequel to ''Film/{{Tron}}'', ''[[VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh Tron 2.0]]'' ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' introduced Byte: although Jet initially thinks he's a Bit, Byte gets indignant and says that he's eight times smarter than any simple Bit. Ironically, this statement betrays the comprehension gap that leads to this trope: a byte is composed of eight bits, but has eight ''orders of magnitude'' greater capacity. If Byte played by the same rules as Bit, he'd be able to say 256 distinct things.


* The trope name itself is the very last line in RiloKiley's "Science vs. Romance".

to:

* The trope name itself is the very last line in RiloKiley's Music/RiloKiley's "Science vs. Romance".


* ''MaxHeadroom'': "Whackets" actually has a mind-control system that worked by flashing a series of zeroes and ones at the ''human'' viewer. Max himself proves exceptionally vulnerable, as he is inherently based on, you guessed it, zeroes and ones.

to:

* ''MaxHeadroom'': ''Series/MaxHeadroom'': "Whackets" actually has a mind-control system that worked by flashing a series of zeroes and ones at the ''human'' viewer. Max himself proves exceptionally vulnerable, as he is inherently based on, you guessed it, zeroes and ones.

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