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It goes almost without saying that things taking place in the modern-day country they are made in are as likely to avert this trope as not - just ask [[Series/TwentyFour Jack Bauer]].

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It goes almost without saying that things taking place in the modern-day country they are made in are as likely to avert this trope as not - just ask [[Series/TwentyFour Jack Bauer]].not.


-> ''"I am said to be a revolutionist in my sympathies, by birth, by breeding, and by principle. I am always on the side of the revolutionists, because there never was a revolution unless there were some oppressive and intolerable conditions against which to revolute."''

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-> ''"I ->''"I am said to be a revolutionist in my sympathies, by birth, by breeding, and by principle. I am always on the side of the revolutionists, because there never was a revolution unless there were some oppressive and intolerable conditions against which to revolute."''




(Try not to confuse "Revolution" and "Rebellion". All revolutions ''are'' rebellions against the established order, but all rebellions ''need not be'' revolutions. Rebellions are driven mostly in opposition to the existing system without necessarily an idea in place to replace the new regime. Rebellions can even include military and parliamentary coups which are usually not seen as positive examples of this trope. They are also vague, limited in outcome and yet, ironically, they are generally more spontaneous as expressions and reactions of genuine sentiments than a revolutionary program.)

It goes almost without saying that things taking place in the modern-day of the country they are made in are as likely to avert this trope as not - just ask [[Series/TwentyFour Jack Bauer]].

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\n(Try not to confuse "Revolution" and "Rebellion". All revolutions ''are'' rebellions against the established order, but all rebellions ''need not be'' revolutions. Rebellions are driven mostly in opposition to the existing system without necessarily an idea in place to replace the new regime. Rebellions can even include military and parliamentary coups which are usually not seen as positive examples of this trope. They are also vague, limited in outcome outcome, and yet, ironically, they are generally more spontaneous as expressions and reactions of genuine sentiments than a revolutionary program.)

It goes almost without saying that things taking place in the modern-day of the country they are made in are as likely to avert this trope as not - just ask [[Series/TwentyFour Jack Bauer]].



* ''Film/VivaZapata'' by Creator/EliaKazan was an attempt at reconstructing this trope. Kazan had become an ex-communist but he believed that genuine revolutionary change was a good thing to strive for. In the film Zapata after succeeding in his rebellion takes office but worries that he'll become a tyrant like he once opposed, so he resolves to fight and live among the people inspiring them from below rather than above.

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* ''Film/VivaZapata'' by Creator/EliaKazan was an attempt at reconstructing this trope. Kazan had become an ex-communist but he believed that genuine revolutionary change was a good thing to strive for. In the film Zapata film, Zapata, after succeeding in his rebellion rebellion, takes office but worries that he'll become a tyrant like he once opposed, so he resolves to fight and live among the people inspiring them from below rather than above.



** Les Mis is made into an exaggerated parody of itself in the Literature/{{Discworld}} novel ''Literature/NightWatch'', in which the ultra-cynic Sam Vimes is propelled back thirty years into the past of his city and realises he has to take the place of the man who led a revolution. The theory, practice and ideology of revolution are seriously questioned along the way.

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** Les Mis is made into an exaggerated parody of itself in the Literature/{{Discworld}} novel ''Literature/NightWatch'', in which the ultra-cynic Sam Vimes is propelled back thirty years into the past of his city and realises he has to take the place of the man who led a revolution. The theory, practice practice, and ideology of revolution are seriously questioned along the way.



** Not only is there the big resistance against President Clark, but Mars and Proxima 3 are also rebelling and generally seen as oppressed planets under the thumb of the increasingly fascist Earth Forces.

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** Not only is there the big resistance against President Clark, but Mars and Proxima 3 are also rebelling and generally seen as oppressed planets under the thumb of the increasingly fascist Earth Forces.



* Subverted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim''. The game starts with the player and some Stormcloak rebels ending up victims of the Empire. (The player almost gets beheaded despite not being a rebel.) This gives the player a positive view of the Stormcloaks. But as the game progresses, it soon turns into a GreyAndGreyMorality situation as it's shown the Stormcloaks and the Imperials both have their flaws. The Stormcloaks' leader is racist, stubborn, and reactionary, but the Empire is oppressing a religion at the behest of the super racist Thalmor. (The Empire agreed to outlaw Talos worship in the White-Gold Concordat.) Both sides are happy to kill the other and the civil war means that the Empire may be less able to defend itself against the Thalmor.

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* Subverted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim''. The game starts with the player and some Stormcloak rebels ending up victims of the Empire. (The player almost gets beheaded despite not being a rebel.) This gives the player a positive view of the Stormcloaks. But as the game progresses, it soon turns into a GreyAndGreyMorality situation as it's shown the Stormcloaks and the Imperials both have their flaws. The Stormcloaks' leader is racist, stubborn, and reactionary, but the Empire is oppressing a religion at the behest of the super racist super-racist Thalmor. (The Empire agreed to outlaw Talos worship in the White-Gold Concordat.) Both sides are happy to kill the other and the civil war means that the Empire may be less able to defend itself against the Thalmor.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents''' take on the American Revolution goes into this trope rather shamelessly. They even show what modern-day America would be like, were it still under British rule; a nation of bad-toothed {{Evil Brit}}s stuck in the early 19th century, and still regularly ravaged by the taxman.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents''' take on the American Revolution goes into this trope rather shamelessly. They even show what modern-day America would be like, were it still under British rule; rule: a nation of bad-toothed [[BritishTeeth bad-toothed]] {{Evil Brit}}s stuck in the early 19th century, and still regularly ravaged by the taxman.


** Les Mis is made into an UpToEleven parody of itself in the Literature/{{Discworld}} novel ''Literature/NightWatch'', in which the ultra-cynic Sam Vimes is propelled back thirty years into the past of his city and realises he has to take the place of the man who led a revolution. The theory, practice and ideology of revolution are seriously questioned along the way.

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** Les Mis is made into an UpToEleven exaggerated parody of itself in the Literature/{{Discworld}} novel ''Literature/NightWatch'', in which the ultra-cynic Sam Vimes is propelled back thirty years into the past of his city and realises he has to take the place of the man who led a revolution. The theory, practice and ideology of revolution are seriously questioned along the way.

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** Les Mis is made into an UpToEleven parody of itself in the Literature/{{Discworld}} novel ''Literature/NightWatch'', in which the ultra-cynic Sam Vimes is propelled back thirty years into the past of his city and realises he has to take the place of the man who led a revolution. The theory, practice and ideology of revolution are seriously questioned along the way.


* ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' portrays the American Revolution as a just cause of revolution against an oppressive English government (to the point that King George III outright says that he'll kill the revolutionaries' friends and families to get them to fall in line). Thus, all the actions taken by Hamilton and Co. against the English (the Boston Tea Party, stealing British cannons, etc) are justified, and when Samuel Seabury offers a contrasting opinion (that all Americans don't necessarily agree with the Revolution), he is talked down and mocked for his beliefs.

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* ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' portrays the American Revolution as a just cause of revolution against an oppressive English government (to the point that King George III outright says that he'll kill the revolutionaries' friends and families to get them to fall in line). Thus, all the actions taken by Hamilton and Co. against the English (the Boston Tea Party, stealing British cannons, etc) are justified, and when Samuel Seabury offers a contrasting opinion (that contrast (the fact that all Americans don't necessarily agree with the Revolution), he is talked down and mocked for his beliefs.statements.


* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'': Diana's SlaveRevolt turned revolution is a bunch of escaped slaves and sympathizers fighting the Kreel Empire to abolish their slavery practices and allow women to be equal citizens. The core group does their level best to do so without ''any casualties'' as they are led by Diana. They are not all treated as saints and some of them have ''very'' checkered backgrounds but their cause and their methods are the opposite of villainous.

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* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'': Diana's SlaveRevolt turned revolution is a bunch of escaped slaves and sympathizers fighting the Kreel Empire to abolish their slavery practices and allow women to be equal citizens. The core group does their level best to do so without ''any casualties'' as they are led by Diana. They are not all treated as saints and some of them have ''very'' checkered backgrounds but their cause and their methods are the opposite of villainous.


Contrast with FullCircleRevolution, TheRemnant, ObligatoryWarCrimeScene, and the DarkMessiah. See also the related and often confused trope of LaResistance. When the rebels are generally good but hampered by infighting, it's WeAreStrugglingTogether. For the opposite, when the rebels are anti-heroes or outright villains, see TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized. For the case where the whole conflict really was "civilized" (for better or worse), see VelvetRevolution.

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Contrast with FullCircleRevolution, TheRemnant, ObligatoryWarCrimeScene, and the DarkMessiah. See also the related and often confused trope of LaResistance. When the rebels are generally good but hampered by infighting, it's WeAreStrugglingTogether. For the opposite, when the rebels are anti-heroes or outright villains, see TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized. For the case where the whole conflict really was "civilized" (for better or worse), see VelvetRevolution.



* ''Film/PansLabyrinth'': A historical exception to the "If the revolutionaries are wearing brown, they're the bad guys" which tells us a bit about the [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies sorting algorithm of political ideologies]]: If you want the DirtyCommies to be the good guys, the bad guys pretty much have to be fascists. We still see them doing the old "[[ObligatoryWarCrimeScene line up soldiers to shoot them in the head]]" shtick that the fascist military was doing itself earlier.

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* ''Film/PansLabyrinth'': A historical exception to the "If the revolutionaries are wearing brown, they're the bad guys" which tells us a bit about the [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies sorting algorithm of political ideologies]]: If you want the DirtyCommies to be the good guys, the bad guys pretty much have to be fascists. We still see them doing the old "[[ObligatoryWarCrimeScene line "line up soldiers to shoot them in the head]]" head" shtick that the fascist military was doing itself earlier.


-->-- '''Creator/MarkTwain'''[[note]]Who ironically lived through a [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar counterexample]].[[/note]]

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-->-- '''Creator/MarkTwain'''[[note]]Who '''Creator/MarkTwain'''[[note]]Who, if his definition included elite-led secession, would have ironically lived through a [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar counterexample]].[[/note]]


[[quoteright:340:[[Art/LibertyLeadingThePeople https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Pillar10-History-French-Revolution-Delacroix_7053.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:340:''[[Theatre/LesMiserables Do you hear the people sing?...]]'']]

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[[quoteright:340:[[Art/LibertyLeadingThePeople [[quoteright:350:[[Art/LibertyLeadingThePeople https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Pillar10-History-French-Revolution-Delacroix_7053.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:340:''[[Theatre/LesMiserables
org/pmwiki/pub/images/la_liberte_guidant_le_peuple.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:''[[Theatre/LesMiserables
Do you hear the people sing?...]]'']]



[[folder:Web Comics]]

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[[folder:Web Comics]][[folder:Webcomics]]


[[quoteright:340: https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Pillar10-History-French-Revolution-Delacroix_7053.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:340: [[quoteright:340:[[Art/LibertyLeadingThePeople https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Pillar10-History-French-Revolution-Delacroix_7053.jpg]]jpg]]]]


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[[folder:Arts]]
* ''Art/LibertyLeadingThePeople'' presents the revolution as a positive force, as the citizens (backlit by the sun) are fighting for their rights and liberty against an oppressive and stingy government (evidenced by the dead soldier who lies in the foreground).
[[/folder]]


[[quoteright:340:[[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Pillar10-History-French-Revolution-Delacroix_7053.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:340:[[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution [[quoteright:340: https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Pillar10-History-French-Revolution-Delacroix_7053.jpg]]]]jpg]]

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* Minor ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'' foe Tarantula's origins involved him being a member of a rebellion against a South American dictatorship only to get thrown out of the group when the other members got disgusted with his indiscriminate bloodshed against innocent civilians as well as government soldiers, at which point he joined up with the dictatorship's forces instead, becoming their twisted version of Captain America.

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* In ''Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix'', when asked why a written Declaration was needed, Thomas Jefferson replies to put forth to the world the reasons why they are rebelling. John Dickinson asks why would they actually want to write down the reasons for an illegal revolution.
--->'''Ben Franklin:''' Mr. Dickinson, ''all'' revolutions are legal in the first person, such as ''our'' revolution. It is only in the third person, ''their'' revolution, where it becomes illegal.


* Subverted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim''. The game starts with the player and some Stormcloak rebels ending up victims of the Empire. (The player almost gets beheaded despite not being a rebel.) This gives the player a positive view of the Stormcloaks. But as the game progresses, it soon turns into a GreyAndGreyMorality situation as it's shown the Stormcloaks and the Imperials both have their flaws. The Stormcloaks' leader is racist and stubborn, but the Empire is oppressing a religion at the behest of the super racist Thalmor. (The Empire agreed to outlaw Talos worship in the White-Gold Concordat.) Both sides are happy to kill the other and the civil war means that the Empire may be less able to defend itself against the Thalmor.

to:

* Subverted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim''. The game starts with the player and some Stormcloak rebels ending up victims of the Empire. (The player almost gets beheaded despite not being a rebel.) This gives the player a positive view of the Stormcloaks. But as the game progresses, it soon turns into a GreyAndGreyMorality situation as it's shown the Stormcloaks and the Imperials both have their flaws. The Stormcloaks' leader is racist and racist, stubborn, and reactionary, but the Empire is oppressing a religion at the behest of the super racist Thalmor. (The Empire agreed to outlaw Talos worship in the White-Gold Concordat.) Both sides are happy to kill the other and the civil war means that the Empire may be less able to defend itself against the Thalmor.


* In the reboot, ''WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower'', the dynamic is repeated, although with more competent villains. The only time that the Rebellion is shown to look bad is in paper-thin Horde propaganda, and the only thing that makes the conquering, warmongering Horde look good is the number of sympathetic or {{Punch Clock Villain}}s in its ranks (though they ''do'' commit significantly fewer human rights violations than in the original series, so there’s that).

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* In the reboot, ''WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower'', the dynamic is repeated, although with more competent villains. The only time that the Rebellion is shown to look bad is in paper-thin Horde propaganda, and the only thing that makes the conquering, warmongering Horde look good is the number of sympathetic or {{Punch Clock Villain}}s in its ranks (though they ''do'' commit significantly fewer human rights violations than in the original series, so there’s that).they have that going for them).

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