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* In ''GreenLantern'' the False Guardians who empowered G'nort and others to intentionally discredit the Green Lantern Corps fill this role.

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* In ''GreenLantern'' ''ComicBook/GreenLantern'' the False Guardians who empowered G'nort and others to intentionally discredit the Green Lantern Corps fill this role.


* In ''Film/TheExorcismOfEmilyRose'', an angel gives the titular character blessings and tactical updates in her war against the devil. While psychiatry (in the movie as well as in RealLife) is convinced that Emily was insane and that it was wrong of her priest to advise her to stop taking her medication, the movie makes it [[AmbiguousSituation ambiguous]] whether the battle was all a matter of insanity (making the angel a FauxEmpoweringEntity who helped Emily destroy herself) or a real battle between spiritual forces (making the angel a EnigmaticEmpoweringEntity who helped Emily defeat the devil and [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth move on to a better place]]).
** Even if she was insane, the movie indicates that maybe her faith was more important anyway. Emily herself was positioned to play this role for people looking for some confirmation of spirituality in the modern world; the movie suggests that if her faith had this positive effect on the world, maybe that was more important and the sacrifice she made would still mean something even if she was actually crazy.

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* In ''Film/TheExorcismOfEmilyRose'', an angel gives the titular character blessings and tactical updates in her war against the devil. While psychiatry (in the movie as well as in RealLife) is convinced that Emily was insane and that it was wrong of her priest to advise her to stop taking her medication, the movie makes it [[AmbiguousSituation ambiguous]] whether the battle was all a matter of insanity (making the angel a FauxEmpoweringEntity who helped Emily destroy herself) or a real battle between spiritual forces (making the angel a EnigmaticEmpoweringEntity who helped Emily defeat the devil and [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth move on to a better place]]).
**
place]]). Even if she was insane, the movie indicates that maybe her faith was more important anyway. Emily herself was positioned to play this role for people looking for some confirmation of spirituality in the modern world; the movie suggests that if her faith had this positive effect on the world, maybe that was more important and the sacrifice she made would still mean something even if she was actually crazy.



* ''Literature/DonQuixote'': Don Quixote meets a rascally innkeeper who he thinks is a Castellan (a castle warden) and asks him for {{Knighting}}. Ironically, in real life, to be knighted as a joke would have disAbled Don Quixote to become a real Knight by the rules of the ''Siete Partidas'' of Alphonso X.

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* ''Literature/DonQuixote'': Don Quixote meets a rascally innkeeper who he thinks is a Castellan (a castle warden) and asks him for {{Knighting}}. Ironically, in real life, to be knighted as a joke would have disAbled disabled Don Quixote to become a real Knight by the rules of the ''Siete Partidas'' of Alphonso X.



* Played for maximum tragedy & angst in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Course Oblivion". The crew put their trust in a shape-shifting alien who they believe to be the Star Fleet Captain Kathryn Janeway until they discover that they are also shape-shifting aliens that have been removed from their home world, forgetting that they were copies of the original crew. This creature does believe itself to be Janeway, and it's trying to keep her crew safe and get them home, just like the real Janeway would. Too bad for the crew that she's not a real Star Fleet officer, and has a really flawed understanding of what is "safe" and what is "home".

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* Played for maximum tragedy & angst in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Course Oblivion". The crew put their trust in a shape-shifting alien who they believe to be the Star Fleet Starfleet Captain Kathryn Janeway until they discover that they are also shape-shifting aliens that have been removed from their home world, forgetting that they were copies of the original crew. This creature does believe itself to be Janeway, and it's trying to keep her crew safe and get them home, just like the real Janeway would. Too bad for the crew that she's not a real Star Fleet Starfleet officer, and has a really flawed understanding of what is "safe" and what is "home".



* ''Series/{{Defiance}}'': The mayor gave her sister (the headmistress of the city's brothel) a coin when they were kids, saying that their mother sacrificed herself to save them and gave them an heirloom coin as a dying wish. It turns out that their mother was just another scavenger who was too afraid to protect her children and ran like hell. Said coin is not from Saint SmittyWarbenJaegarManJensen because there is no Saint SmittyWarben... yeah.

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* ''Series/{{Defiance}}'': The mayor gave her sister (the headmistress of the city's brothel) a coin when they were kids, saying that their mother sacrificed herself to save them and gave them an heirloom coin as a dying wish. It turns out that their mother was just another scavenger who was too afraid to protect her children and ran like hell. Said coin is not from Saint SmittyWarbenJaegarManJensen Smitty Warben Jaegar Man Jensen because there is no Saint SmittyWarben...Smitty Warben... yeah.


* The ''WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends'' ChristmasEpisode "A Lost Claus" has 8-year-old Mac having his belief in Santa shattered when a few hundred Santas show up at the home. He believes that if children imagined all these Santas then maybe he isn't real. The night before Christmas, Mac sends out a prayer to Santa (who is actually never himself shown apart from the ones the kids imagined) asking for a sign he's real. He doesn't want the usual swag kids ask for, he asks for something incredibly mundane: underwear.

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* The ''WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends'' ChristmasEpisode "A Lost Claus" has 8-year-old Mac having his belief in Santa shattered when a few hundred Santas show up at the home. He believes that if children imagined all these Santas then maybe he isn't real. Madame Foster has a heart-to-heart with Mac about it, stating that's a rite of passage for kids when they stop believing in Santa ("The truth will eventually come out," she explains). The night before Christmas, Mac sends out a prayer to Santa (who is actually never himself shown apart from the ones the kids imagined) asking for a sign he's real. He doesn't want the usual swag kids ask for, he asks for something incredibly mundane: underwear.


* The ''WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends'' ChristmasEpisode "A Lost Claus" has 8-year-old Mac having his belief in Santa shattered when a few hundred Santa show up at the home. He believes that if children imagined all these Santas then maybe he isn't real. The night before Christmas, Mac sends out a prayer to Santa (who is actually never himself shown apart from the ones the kids imagined) asking for a sign he's real. He doesn't want the usual swag kids ask for, he asks for something incredibly mundane: underwear.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends'' ChristmasEpisode "A Lost Claus" has 8-year-old Mac having his belief in Santa shattered when a few hundred Santa Santas show up at the home. He believes that if children imagined all these Santas then maybe he isn't real. The night before Christmas, Mac sends out a prayer to Santa (who is actually never himself shown apart from the ones the kids imagined) asking for a sign he's real. He doesn't want the usual swag kids ask for, he asks for something incredibly mundane: underwear.

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* The ''WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends'' ChristmasEpisode "A Lost Claus" has 8-year-old Mac having his belief in Santa shattered when a few hundred Santa show up at the home. He believes that if children imagined all these Santas then maybe he isn't real. The night before Christmas, Mac sends out a prayer to Santa (who is actually never himself shown apart from the ones the kids imagined) asking for a sign he's real. He doesn't want the usual swag kids ask for, he asks for something incredibly mundane: underwear.


* [[spoiler:Gil Graham]] from ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaAs'' has provided Hayate with a home and allowance, even paying for hospital funds. [[spoiler:Turns out that this is him trying to ease his guilt over the fact that she's going to sacrificed as part of his plan to seal the Book of Darkness.]]

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* [[spoiler:Gil Graham]] from ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaAs'' has provided Hayate with a home and allowance, even paying for hospital funds. [[spoiler:Turns out that this is him trying to ease his guilt over the fact that she's going to be sacrificed as part of his plan to seal the Book of Darkness.]]


* [[spoiler:Gil Graham]] from ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaAs'' has provided Hayate with a home and allowance, even paying for hospital funds. [[spoiler:Turns out that this is his gambit to make Hayate the master of the Book of Darkness, [[WellIntentionedExtremist allowing him to seal the Book of Darkness away.]]]]

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* [[spoiler:Gil Graham]] from ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaAs'' has provided Hayate with a home and allowance, even paying for hospital funds. [[spoiler:Turns out that this is him trying to ease his gambit to make Hayate guilt over the master fact that she's going to sacrificed as part of the Book of Darkness, [[WellIntentionedExtremist allowing him his plan to seal the Book of Darkness away.]]]]Darkness.]]


** Indeed, Haley is [[GenreSavvy immediately suspicious]] of this verdict because the logic of the closing statements pointed towards "Guilty, sentenced to community service." Unfortunately for the rest of the Order, she's TheUnintelligible at the time and thus cannot explain this without resorting to charades.

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** Indeed, Haley is [[GenreSavvy immediately suspicious]] suspicious of this verdict because the logic of the closing statements pointed towards "Guilty, sentenced to community service." Unfortunately for the rest of the Order, she's TheUnintelligible at the time and thus cannot explain this without resorting to charades.

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** In another episode, Daggett is fooled into thinking he has found the elusive [[BigfootSasquatchAndYeti Big Byoo-tox]], and asks him to train him in the art of being sneaky, so he can get a toy that Norbert won't let him have. "Big Byoo-tox" turns out to be a big, hairy, naked Canadian guy. [[spoiler: The ''real'' Big Byoo-tox is out in space, holding the Earth up with his butt.]]

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* On ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBeavers'', a recurring character is "The Lady of the Lanes," (real name: Laverta Lutz), an [[{{Gonk}} ugly]] woman with a terrible cough and a BeehiveHairdo styled into a bowling pin shape. She helps Daggett a lot, although it's said that most of the time, [[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve it works because Daggett believes in her and in himself]].


* ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'': Father Cornello, leader of the cult of Leto, is a Faux Empowering Entity to the town of Reole/Liore.



* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' subverts this with Sybill Trelawney, Hogwarts's Divination professor. She initially appears to be either a fraud or a self-deluded example of this trope, but she turns out to be a NotSoPhonyPsychic.


* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' subverts this with Sybill Trelawney, Hogwarts's Divination professor, who turns out to be a NotSoPhonyPsychic.

to:

* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' subverts this with Sybill Trelawney, Hogwarts's Divination professor, who professor. She initially appears to be either a fraud or a self-deluded example of this trope, but she turns out to be a NotSoPhonyPsychic.


* In ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'', the Wizard is ultimately proven to be a fraud, giving out {{Magic Feather}}s as if they were real gifts (however, the gifts are symbolic. Thus they can be considered valid in [[Film/TheWizardOfOz the film version]], which was AllJustADream.) In [[Literature/LandOfOz the novels]], the Wizard later learns real magic that nonetheless never has as big an effect on characters or the story as those three symbolic gifts he gave in the first book.

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* In ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'', the Wizard is ultimately proven to be a fraud, giving out {{Magic Feather}}s as if they were real gifts (however, the gifts are symbolic. Thus gifts. As with most {{Magic Feather}}s, though, they can be considered valid in [[Film/TheWizardOfOz do encourage characters to realize the film version]], which potential that was AllJustADream.) [[ItWasWithYouAllAlong inside them the whole time]]. In [[Literature/LandOfOz the later novels]], the Wizard later learns real magic that nonetheless never has as big an effect on characters or the story as those three symbolic gifts he gave in the first book.


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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' subverts this with Sybill Trelawney, Hogwarts's Divination professor, who turns out to be a NotSoPhonyPsychic.

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* ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' leaves it ambiguous whether the ghost is really Hamlet's dead father, a demon manipulating Hamlet into violence, or just a figment of Hamlet's imagination.

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