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* Early comic books didn't have ads within stories. A short story would take a few pages, end, then we'd get some ads, before a new story started. During UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, books started being advertised as "novel-length stories", which meant each segment was a "chapter", divided by ads. Later still, the chapter headings were removed, but a text in the lower-right corner of a page preceding ads assured the reader that the story would be "continued after the following page". It took a few more years before publishers decided that readers understood that the story didn't end abrubtly when an ad showed up.

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* Early comic books didn't have ads within stories. A short story would take a few pages, end, then we'd get some ads, before a new story started. During UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, books started being advertised as "novel-length stories", which meant each segment was a "chapter", divided by ads. Later still, the chapter headings were removed, but a text in the lower-right corner of a page preceding ads assured the reader that the story would be "continued after the following page". It took a few more years before publishers decided that readers understood that the story didn't end abrubtly abruptly when an ad showed up.



* The 3rd Edition of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' introduced the ''Attack Bonus'': you roll a 20-sided die, add your attack bonus, and compare it to the Armor Class of your enemy. If your roll is equal or higher, you hit. The 2nd Edition had [=THAC0=] (To Hit Armor Class 0): you roll a 20-sided die, subtract the Armor Class of your enemy (which can be a negative number), and compare the result to your own [=THAC0=]. If the result is equal or greater than your [=THAC0=], you hit. The odds are completely identical in both systems. The 1st Edition had all the math done for you - in the form of a chart buried halfway through the DungeonMaster's book that had to be consulted for every single attack. It may come across as the same thing in the end, at least if you started with the old systems and grew used to it, but it's hardly intuitive.

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* The 3rd Edition of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' introduced the ''Attack Bonus'': you roll a 20-sided die, add your attack bonus, and compare it to the Armor Class of your enemy. If your roll is equal or higher, you hit. The 2nd Edition had [=THAC0=] (To Hit Armor Class 0): you roll a 20-sided die, subtract the Armor Class of your enemy (which can be a negative number), and compare the result to your own [=THAC0=]. If the result is equal or greater than your [=THAC0=], you hit. The odds are completely identical in both systems. The 1st Edition had all the math done for you - -- in the form of a chart buried halfway through the DungeonMaster's book that had to be consulted for every single attack. It may come across as the same thing in the end, at least if you started with the old systems and grew used to it, but it's hardly intuitive.



* The shopping segments on ''Series/WheelOfFortune''. Contestants would be encouraged to spend their winnings on prizes before continuing, and any leftover cash could be kept on the scoreboard, albeit with the risk of being lost to a Bankrupt spin in the next round. This was done [[MostWritersAreMale in the hopes of making the show more appealing to women]], because [[Creator/DaveChappelle women be shoppin']] and all that - in fact, the original pilot (shot in 1973) was called ''Shopper's Bazaar'' and had a different "shopping" mechanism that declared the winner as "whoever bought the most prizes". [[note]](It should be noted that ''Bazaar'' was viewed as a total disaster by creator Merv Griffin, NBC's Lin Bolen, and test audiences who were shown the pilot, resulting in the format and visual style being overhauled into the ones that got ''Wheel'' on the air.)[[/note]] In the late 80s, the shopping element was retired: whoever solved the puzzle now banked their winnings in cash and would receive it in cash when they left - giving the show more available airtime to devote to puzzles.

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* The shopping segments on ''Series/WheelOfFortune''. Contestants would be encouraged to spend their winnings on prizes before continuing, and any leftover cash could be kept on the scoreboard, albeit with the risk of being lost to a Bankrupt spin in the next round. This was done [[MostWritersAreMale in the hopes of making the show more appealing to women]], because [[Creator/DaveChappelle women be shoppin']] and all that - -- in fact, the original pilot (shot in 1973) was called ''Shopper's Bazaar'' and had a different "shopping" mechanism that declared the winner as "whoever bought the most prizes". [[note]](It should be noted that ''Bazaar'' was viewed as a total disaster by creator Merv Griffin, NBC's Lin Bolen, and test audiences who were shown the pilot, resulting in the format and visual style being overhauled into the ones that got ''Wheel'' on the air.)[[/note]] In the late 80s, the shopping element was retired: whoever solved the puzzle now banked their winnings in cash and would receive it in cash when they left - -- giving the show more available airtime to devote to puzzles.



* As far as a TropeMaker goes, enter the woodblock printing press, which was invented in the 3rd Century and was eventually replaced by movable type printing, which was invented around the 11th Century, making this one OlderThanFeudalism (at least in China, as it took until Gutenberg and the Renaissance for Europe to catch up, making the European side of this one ''literally'' OlderThanPrint). It took ''several centuries'' for printers to figure out it was easier, quicker, and more economic to carve out single-character sorts (essentially small stamps each representing a single letter or character, much like the ones you find in a typewriter) than carving out a big stamp out of a single piece of wood for an entire page, making correcting mistakes impossible and requiring a new hand carving for each new page. Granted, the lower character count of the Latin Alphabet versus Asian character sets made the development more practical in the West than the East: several people in East Asia had come up with the idea of movable type - even movable ''metal'' type - well before Gutenberg, but because of the logographic system used/then used [[note]](a few of the inventors were Korean, but although today Korean uses the alphabetic Hangul script, at the time the inventors were working Korean was written exclusively in Hanja, i.e. Chinese characters. Indeed, Hangul was first introduced at about the same time that Gutenberg developed his Latin alphabet printing press - about the 1440s CE.)[[/note]] to write the languages in question, there were just too many characters for the system to be useful. With the Latin alphabet and its relatively-limited character set, movable type was much more useful and found a market much more easily.

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* As far as a TropeMaker goes, enter the woodblock printing press, which was invented in the 3rd Century century and was eventually replaced by movable type printing, which was invented around the 11th Century, century, making this one OlderThanFeudalism (at least in China, as it took until Gutenberg and the Renaissance for Europe to catch up, making the European side of this one ''literally'' OlderThanPrint). It took ''several centuries'' for printers to figure out it was easier, quicker, and more economic to carve out single-character sorts (essentially small stamps each representing a single letter or character, much like the ones you find in a typewriter) than carving out a big stamp out of a single piece of wood for an entire page, making correcting mistakes impossible and requiring a new hand carving for each new page. Granted, the lower character count of the Latin Alphabet versus Asian character sets made the development more practical in the West than the East: several people in East Asia had come up with the idea of movable type - even movable ''metal'' type - well before Gutenberg, but because of the logographic system used/then used [[note]](a few of the inventors were Korean, but although today Korean uses the alphabetic Hangul script, at the time the inventors were working Korean was written exclusively in Hanja, i.e. Chinese characters. Indeed, Hangul was first introduced at about the same time that Gutenberg developed his Latin alphabet printing press - about the 1440s CE.)[[/note]] to write the languages in question, there were just too many characters for the system to be useful. With the Latin alphabet and its relatively-limited character set, movable type was much more useful and found a market much more easily.



* For the longest time, there was no set color scheme for election maps in the US. What color represented what party's candidate varied from one network to another or even from year to year. In the hotly contested 2000 presidential election (which remained unresolved, and thus constantly in the news, for over a month after Election Day), it just happened that every network was using red to represent Republican George W. Bush and blue to represent Democrat Al Gore. A few months later, the terms "red state" and "blue state" were permanent fixtures in every American's vocabulary, and no one has deviated from the standard since.[[note]]Confusingly for non-US people, since just about every other country in the world traditionally uses red to represent the political '''left''', and less universally, but in many cases blue for the right[[/note]] Predictive maps have even started using paler versions of those colors to indicate lower probabilities of victory.

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* For the longest time, there was no set color scheme for election maps in the US. What color represented what party's candidate varied from one network to another or even from year to year. In the hotly contested 2000 presidential election (which remained unresolved, and thus constantly in the news, for over a month after Election Day), it just happened that every network was using red to represent Republican George W. Bush and blue to represent Democrat Al Gore. A few months later, the terms "red state" and "blue state" were permanent fixtures in every American's vocabulary, and no one has deviated from the standard since.[[note]]Confusingly for non-US people, since just about every other country in the world traditionally uses red to represent the political '''left''', and less universally, universally but in many cases cases, blue for the right[[/note]] Predictive maps have even started using paler versions of those colors to indicate lower probabilities of victory.


* Integrated tubular magazines for repeating firearms were invented about two decades earlier than the current standard detachable magazine. This is likely a matter of cost (no need to manufacture multiple magazines per gun) and beliefs by officers that adopting a detachable magazine would risk careless soldiers losing them. The Lee-Enfield rifle, for example, has a detachable magazine but was never issued with spares for precisely this concern; by the time this was realized to be an outdated fear, the Lee-Enfield was already obsolete as a front line rifle.
* Similarly, one of the earliest forms of the modern cartridge was the paper cartridge, which wrapped all of the necessary components to load and fire a muzzle-loading firearm in one convenient package for far faster reloads while carrying less overall weight. Strangely, however, the Rocket Ball - which was a bullet with a hollowed-out section in the back to hold the gunpowder, plugged with a percussion cap at the very back - came about and saw widespread use about two decades before the modern metallic cartridge, which is basically ''the same idea as the paper cartridge'' but with all metal, did. The Rocket Ball failed to catch on due to the [[RealityEnsues tiny amount of gunpowder that can fit in a hollow bullet]] making it incredibly weak. The Rocket Ball's design also makes it conceptually identical to the more modern idea of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caseless_ammunition caseless ammunition]], but modern caseless ammunition involves encasing the bullet and primer in an entire block of propellant to allow for better velocity.
* When invented, submachine guns were expensive, high-tech weapons. Early designs like the German MP 18 and American Thompson had wooden stocks, complex and heavy clockwork-driven drum magazines, and made almost exclusive use of machined parts. Other designs of the period followed this pattern, relegating sub-machine guns to niche applications where the high cost could be justified and leaving the world's armies to stick with bolt-action battle rifles as the standard-issue guns. While the German MP 40 and Soviet [=PPSh-41=] made a run at lowering the cost of sub-machine guns through the use of metal stampings (though the latter still keeping wooden furniture), and the Soviets realized how effective they could be when issued in more extensive numbers (compared to other armies that typically reserved around only one submachine gun per squadron, the Soviets would often arm entire ''divisions'' with nothing but [=PPSh=]es), it wasn't until 1941 that the British developed the sub-machine gun concept into the dirt-cheap everyman weapon it is today. The resulting [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sten Sten Gun]] could be manufactured in less than 5 man hours, using basic tooling ''for under a pound''. It was so cheap and easy to make that they were able to airdrop thousands of them for use with resistance fighters in occupied countries (who themselves could manufacture even more with little difficulty) and ''still'' have more than enough left over to equip themselves.

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* Integrated tubular magazines for repeating firearms were invented about two decades earlier than the current standard detachable magazine. This is likely a matter of cost (no need to manufacture multiple magazines per gun) and beliefs by officers that adopting a detachable magazine would risk careless soldiers losing them. The Lee-Enfield rifle, for example, has a detachable magazine but was never issued with spares and even frequently had its issued magazine chained to the rifle for precisely this concern; by the time this was realized to be an outdated fear, the Lee-Enfield was already obsolete as a front line rifle.
* Similarly, one of the earliest forms of the modern cartridge was the paper cartridge, which wrapped all of the necessary components to load and fire a muzzle-loading firearm in one convenient package for far faster reloads while carrying less overall weight. Strangely, however, the Rocket Ball - which was a bullet with a hollowed-out section in the back to hold the gunpowder, plugged with a percussion cap at the very back - came about and saw widespread use about two decades before the modern metallic cartridge, which is basically ''the same idea as the paper cartridge'' but with all metal, did. The Rocket Ball failed to catch on due to the [[RealityEnsues tiny amount of gunpowder that can fit in a hollow bullet]] making it incredibly weak. The Rocket Ball's design also makes it conceptually identical to the more modern idea of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caseless_ammunition caseless ammunition]], but modern caseless ammunition involves encasing the bullet and primer in an entire block of propellant to allow for better velocity.
velocity (the Rocket Ball failed because there was barely any room for propellant in the bullets).
* When invented, submachine guns were expensive, high-tech weapons. Early designs like the German MP 18 and American Thompson had wooden stocks, complex and heavy clockwork-driven drum magazines, and made almost exclusive use of machined parts. Other designs of the period followed this pattern, relegating sub-machine submachine guns to niche applications where the high cost could be justified and leaving the world's armies to stick with bolt-action battle rifles as the standard-issue guns. While the German MP 40 and Soviet [=PPSh-41=] made a run at lowering the cost of sub-machine submachine guns through the use of metal stampings (though the latter still keeping wooden furniture), and the Soviets realized how effective they could be when issued in more extensive numbers (compared to other armies that typically reserved around only one submachine gun per squadron, the Soviets would often arm entire ''divisions'' with nothing but [=PPSh=]es), it wasn't until 1941 that the British developed the sub-machine submachine gun concept into the dirt-cheap everyman weapon it is today. The resulting [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sten Sten Gun]] could be manufactured in less than 5 man hours, using basic tooling ''for under a pound''. It was so cheap and easy to make that they were able to airdrop thousands of them for use with resistance fighters in occupied countries (who themselves could manufacture even more with little difficulty) and ''still'' have more than enough left over to equip themselves.



* The intermediate cartridge fired by assault rifles has been technically possible since the invention of smokeless powder back in the 1890s And some people experimented with the idea pretty quickly with the intention of taking out lightly armored targets like periscopes and balloons. However it still took people more than half a century to realize that most soldiers don't need a rifle that fires a full sized bullet when something a fraction of the size can get the job done.

to:

* The intermediate cartridge fired by assault rifles has been technically possible since the invention of smokeless powder back in the 1890s And 1890s, and some people experimented with the idea pretty quickly with the intention of taking out lightly armored targets like periscopes and balloons. However However, it still took people more than half a century to realize that most soldiers don't need a rifle that fires a full sized full-sized bullet when something a fraction of the size can get the job done.



* Aircraft carrier designs had two major breakthroughs in terms of design, both of which where pretty obvious in hindsight. The first was getting rid of any ancillary take off decks and going with one flight deck, adding a ton of hangar space. The second was to have a second landing runway on the main flight deck angled slightly to the take-off runway. Prior to this an aircraft carrier couldn't safely launch and land planes at the same time. To make matters worse the first ship used as a dedicated carrier, HMS Furious, had a super structure jutting up in the middle of the flight deck[[note]]She had been designed as a battlecruiser[[/note]] forcing the pilots to land on the forward flight deck at an angle. And they all wrote on the merits of this landing method, but it took people forty some odd years to think to combine it with a full deck carrier.

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* Aircraft carrier designs had two major breakthroughs in terms of design, both of which where pretty obvious in hindsight. The first was getting rid of any ancillary take off decks and going with one flight deck, adding a ton of hangar space. The second was to have a second landing runway on the main flight deck angled slightly to the take-off runway. Prior to this an aircraft carrier couldn't safely launch and land planes at the same time. To make matters worse the first ship used as a dedicated carrier, HMS Furious, ''Furious'', had a super structure superstructure jutting up in the middle of the flight deck[[note]]She deck (since she had been first designed as a battlecruiser[[/note]] battlecruiser and later converted to carrying aircraft) forcing the pilots to land on the forward flight deck at an angle. And they all wrote on the merits of this landing method, but it took people forty some odd years to think to combine it with a full deck carrier.



** The writing systems for individual languages fit the pattern even more, since the way languages are pronounced gradually shifts and spellings that made sense in the past start making less and less sense, so reforms will occasionally spring up to kick out unnecessary letters (like the changes in Russian during the founding of the Soviet Union), add new letters to make sound changes more obvious (like in Armenian), remove silent letters (like Portuguese did during the mid-20th Century), or simply reform patterns so that spelling was more predictable (like nearly everybody else has done over the past couple of centuries). English is the major exception, which is partly why English spelling is so terrible. Reading some old texts isn't a huge problem if you know what the differences are, but actually writing the old way is a lot more complicated, and in some cases really unpredictable.)

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** The writing systems for individual languages fit the pattern even more, since the way languages are pronounced gradually shifts and spellings that made sense in the past start making less and less sense, so reforms will occasionally spring up to kick out unnecessary letters (like the changes in Russian during the founding of the Soviet Union), add new letters to make sound changes more obvious (like in Armenian), remove silent letters (like Portuguese did during the mid-20th Century), century), or simply reform patterns so that spelling was more predictable (like nearly everybody else has done over the past couple of centuries). English is the major exception, which is partly why English spelling is so terrible. Reading some old texts isn't a huge problem if you know what the differences are, but actually writing the old way is a lot more complicated, and in some cases really unpredictable.)


* WASD controls, again mostly in first-person shooters. This took even longer to become commonly accepted than mouselook, and even after the strengths of WASD were demonstrated in [[TournamentPlay high-level]] ''Quake'' games in 1996/1997, many games as late as [[UsefulNotes/The200s 2000 or 2001]] still used the arrow keys (or, slightly better, the numeric pad) as their default movement keys, sometimes not even giving the player the option of changing them. It's slightly baffling that it took anyone this long to realize that WASD is where your left hand naturally rests on a keyboard (assuming you're not using the mouse with your left hand), and that it puts more than a dozen other keys within easy access of the same hand without having to move it away from movement, while arrow keys only get about nine other keys within easy access.

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* WASD controls, again mostly in first-person shooters. This took even longer to become commonly accepted than mouselook, and even after the strengths of WASD were demonstrated in [[TournamentPlay high-level]] ''Quake'' games in 1996/1997, many games as late as [[UsefulNotes/The200s [[UsefulNotes/The2000s 2000 or 2001]] still used the arrow keys (or, slightly better, the numeric pad) as their default movement keys, sometimes not even giving the player the option of changing them. It's slightly baffling that it took anyone this long to realize that WASD is where your left hand naturally rests on a keyboard (assuming you're not using the mouse with your left hand), and that it puts more than a dozen other keys within easy access of the same hand without having to move it away from movement, while arrow keys only get about nine other keys within easy access.


* WASD controls, again mostly in first-person shooters. This took even longer to become commonly accepted than mouselook, and even after the strengths of WASD were demonstrated in [[TournamentPlay high-level]] ''Quake'' games in 1996/1997, many games as late as [[UsefulNotes/TheOughts 2000 or 2001]] still used the arrow keys (or, slightly better, the numeric pad) as their default movement keys, sometimes not even giving the player the option of changing them. It's slightly baffling that it took anyone this long to realize that WASD is where your left hand naturally rests on a keyboard (assuming you're not using the mouse with your left hand), and that it puts more than a dozen other keys within easy access of the same hand without having to move it away from movement, while arrow keys only get about nine other keys within easy access.

to:

* WASD controls, again mostly in first-person shooters. This took even longer to become commonly accepted than mouselook, and even after the strengths of WASD were demonstrated in [[TournamentPlay high-level]] ''Quake'' games in 1996/1997, many games as late as [[UsefulNotes/TheOughts [[UsefulNotes/The200s 2000 or 2001]] still used the arrow keys (or, slightly better, the numeric pad) as their default movement keys, sometimes not even giving the player the option of changing them. It's slightly baffling that it took anyone this long to realize that WASD is where your left hand naturally rests on a keyboard (assuming you're not using the mouse with your left hand), and that it puts more than a dozen other keys within easy access of the same hand without having to move it away from movement, while arrow keys only get about nine other keys within easy access.


* When cattle horns went out of fashion, the initial tactic was chopping them off. It was done with a guillotine which took a lot of strength to operate, the cattle required full anesthesia, the blades of the guillotine tended to cut some blood vessels, leading to a RealLife case of HighPressureBlood (there was a way to put a rope ligature to prevent it, but the blades often cut the rope as well)... then someone realized that it's far simpler to give the cow some local anesthesia and saw off the horns.

to:

* ** When cattle horns went out of fashion, the initial tactic was chopping them off. It was done with a guillotine which took a lot of strength to operate, the cattle required full anesthesia, the blades of the guillotine tended to cut some blood vessels, leading to a RealLife case of HighPressureBlood (there was a way to put a rope ligature to prevent it, but the blades often cut the rope as well)... then someone realized that it's far simpler to give the cow some local anesthesia and saw off the horns.


* The "dreadnought" was an idea to have battleships have the majority of their gun volley weight contained in a few big guns. It made every warship constructed prior obsolete. But the only really innovative technology in the construction of ''Dreadnought'' herself was the use of steam turbine engines, and other nations proved the concept was viable with the use of triple expansion engines traditionally used. Ever since the steam engine cleared enough deck space for turrets, the concept has been possible its just that no one thought that maybe instead of having only two turrets, the ship should have more.
** And after that the idea of superimposed turrets[[note]]That is to say turrets that can fire directly over another[[/note]] took a while to catch on. Fair enough the United States used it out the gate, but everyone else avoided it like the plague.It was thought that such a design would wear down the tops of the lower turret because battleship gun blasts were that strong. However it took over a for every one but the Americans to realize that any damage to the top of the superimposed turret were more than offset by stress to the hull of using offset turrets. And then they promptly realized that the damage to the superimposed turret was really not a thing.
** Another major breakthrough spurned by the dreadnought concept was the invention of the destroyer. By essentially cutting an unprotected cruiser in half, and moving its torpedoes to rotatable launchers to the deck, it could fire all its armament to either side, making a ship that was cheaper and faster than an unprotected cruiser with no loss of combat effectiveness. Que everyone wondering why they were doubling the armaments on both sides to begin with.

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* The "dreadnought" was an the idea to have for battleships to have the majority of their gun volley weight contained in a few big guns. It made every warship prior constructed prior warship obsolete. But the only really innovative technology in the construction of ''Dreadnought'' herself was the use of steam turbine engines, and other nations proved the concept was viable with the use of the same triple expansion engines that were traditionally used. Ever since The replacement of the steam engine cleared enough deck space for turrets, the concept has been possible its turrets; it's just that no one thought that maybe instead of having only two turrets, the ship should have more.more than just the two.
** And after that the idea of superimposed turrets[[note]]That is to say say, turrets that can fire directly over one another[[/note]] took a while to catch on. Fair enough the The United States used it out of the gate, but everyone else avoided it like the plague.plague. It was thought that such a design would wear down the tops of the lower turret because due to the strength of battleship gun blasts were that strong. However it took blasts. It became evident over a for every one but the Americans to realize time that any damage to the top of the superimposed turret were was more than offset by stress to the hull of using offset turrets. And then they promptly realized turrets, and that the expected damage to the superimposed turret was wasn't really not a thing.occurring.
** Another major breakthrough spurned by the dreadnought concept was the invention of the destroyer. By essentially cutting an unprotected cruiser in half, and moving its torpedoes to rotatable launchers to the deck, it could fire all its armament to either side, making a ship that was cheaper and faster than an unprotected cruiser with no loss of combat effectiveness. Que Cue everyone wondering why they were doubling the armaments on both sides to begin with.


* The intermediate cartridge fired by assault rifles has been technically possible since the invention of smokeless powder back in the 1890s And some people experimented with the idea pretty quickly with the intention of tacking out lightly armored targets like periscopes and balloons. However it still took people more than half a century to realize that most soldiers don't need a rifle that fires a full sized bullet when something a fraction of the size can get the job done.

to:

* The intermediate cartridge fired by assault rifles has been technically possible since the invention of smokeless powder back in the 1890s And some people experimented with the idea pretty quickly with the intention of tacking taking out lightly armored targets like periscopes and balloons. However it still took people more than half a century to realize that most soldiers don't need a rifle that fires a full sized bullet when something a fraction of the size can get the job done.


** He also tells how he had to operate a cow with an abscess in her throat. It was a frightening piece of work, because a single nick at the jugular or the carotid would have meant death, and both were all too close. Later, he realized one can tie the scalpel to his fingers and reach the abscess through the mouth.

to:

** He also tells how he had to operate on a cow with an abscess in her throat. It was a frightening piece of work, because a single nick at the jugular or the carotid would have meant death, and both were all too close. Later, he realized one can tie the scalpel to his fingers and reach the abscess through the mouth.


* You would think something as obvious as PointBuildSystem would be around from the very start of the tabletop RPG, given how much freedom it gives to player and how relatively easy to design it is. But for years the only way of making characters in various systems was to just randomly generate them by rolling dice. In some of the oldest game you couldn't even swap the dice outcome between various statistics, instead rolling them in sequence. Other had tables full of modifiers for different scenario types and classes to help with the outcome of rolls. Still got terrible stats in the end thanks to RandomNumberGod? Tough luck. More, the sheer concept of having an idea for your character first and then spreading skills, stats and what not to fit the concept was considered as ''cheating'' and sneered upon.

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* You would think something as obvious as PointBuildSystem would be around from the very start of the tabletop RPG, given how much freedom it gives to player and how relatively easy to design it is. But for years the only way of making characters in various systems was to just randomly generate them by rolling dice. In some of the oldest game you couldn't even swap the dice outcome between various statistics, instead rolling them in sequence. Other Others had tables full of modifiers for different scenario types and classes to help with the outcome of rolls. Still got terrible stats in the end thanks to RandomNumberGod? Tough luck. More, the sheer concept of having an idea for your character first and then spreading skills, stats and what not to fit the concept was considered as ''cheating'' and sneered upon.


* The earlier ''VideoGame/{{Ys}}'' games had a unorthodox way for the player to execute melee attacks: instead of pressing an attack button, the trick was to ram into the monster at an offset angle, with the monster winning the attack if it lines up directly. The series largely abandoned this system from ''Ys V'' on.

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* The earlier ''VideoGame/{{Ys}}'' games had a an unorthodox way for the player to execute melee attacks: instead of pressing an attack button, the trick was to ram into the monster at an offset angle, with the monster winning the attack if it lines up directly. The series largely abandoned this system from ''Ys V'' on.


* Creator/JamesHerriot describes in his books how, when cattle horns went out of fashion, the initial tactic was chopping them off. It was done with a guillotine which took a lot of strength to operate, the cattle required full anesthesia, the blades of the guillotine tended to cut some blood vessels, leading to a RealLife case of HighPressureBlood (there was a way to put a rope ligature to prevent it, but the blades often cut the rope as well)... then someone realized that it's far simpler to give the cow some local anesthesia and saw off the horns.

to:

* Creator/JamesHerriot describes has two cases described in his books how, when books:
* When
cattle horns went out of fashion, the initial tactic was chopping them off. It was done with a guillotine which took a lot of strength to operate, the cattle required full anesthesia, the blades of the guillotine tended to cut some blood vessels, leading to a RealLife case of HighPressureBlood (there was a way to put a rope ligature to prevent it, but the blades often cut the rope as well)... then someone realized that it's far simpler to give the cow some local anesthesia and saw off the horns.horns.
** He also tells how he had to operate a cow with an abscess in her throat. It was a frightening piece of work, because a single nick at the jugular or the carotid would have meant death, and both were all too close. Later, he realized one can tie the scalpel to his fingers and reach the abscess through the mouth.


* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' has a few, given that its earliest games were the TropeCodifier for StrategyRPG.
** The earliest game didn't display any unit's movement ranges, yours or the enemy's. You had to manually count them out.
** The Combat Forecast window in every game up until [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade the 6th instalment]] displayed the attacker's Might and the defender's Defense, you had to do the math yourself to work out how much damage would result. Later games display the resulting damage directly. Earlier games also lacked the "x2" indicator to show when one combatant was fast enough to attack twice, this was also something you had to calculate yourself.



** Another example involves [[OldSaveBonus transferring Pokémon from older games to newer ones]]. Transferring Pokémon from the Gen 3 games to the Gen 4 game (and from the Gen 4 games to the Gen 5 games) involve playing a mini-game that's so tedious it almost makes it not worth the effort to transfer Pokémon. It also doesn't help that you need to move six Pokémon at a time (no more, no less). Moving monsters from the Gen 4 games to the Gen 5 games is also inconvenient as you also need a second Nintendo DS system for the other cart. The transfer from Gen 5 to Gen 6 was much more streamlined as it took out the mini-game aspect and you're able to move everything that is in the first box of the PC in the game you are transferring from. Transferring to Pokémon Bank even allows you to skip Gen 6 altogether and move everything to Gen 7. It can also be done with just one UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS as opposed to several UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo DS}}es.

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** Another example involves [[OldSaveBonus transferring Pokémon from older games to newer ones]]. Transferring between Generations 1 and 2 required actual ''trading'', needing two Game Boys and a Link Cable, and the Pokémon being sent back to Generation 1 had to be manually stripped of any moves that didn't exist back then. Transferring Pokémon from the Gen 3 games to the Gen 4 game (and from the Gen 4 games to the Gen 5 games) involve involved playing a mini-game that's so tedious it almost makes it not worth the effort to transfer Pokémon. It also doesn't help that you need to move six Pokémon at a time (no more, no less). Moving monsters from the Gen 4 games to the Gen 5 games is also inconvenient as you also need a second Nintendo DS system for the other cart. The transfer from Gen 5 to Gen 6 was much more streamlined as it took out the mini-game aspect and you're able to move everything that is in the first box of the PC in the game you are transferring from. Transferring to Pokémon Bank even allows you to skip Gen 6 altogether and move everything to Gen 7. It can also be done with just one UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS as opposed to several UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo DS}}es.


** A related issue is with what control the right-mouse button is used for. In the early days before SecondaryFire became common, right mouse would control all sorts of odd things depending on the game - even when secondary fire started becoming a thing, it would usually sooner be stuck on ''middle'' mouse than right. This even still bites as you start entering the TurnOfTheMillennium, where right mouse was standardized for either secondary fire or aiming down your weapon's sights, and some holdouts still insist on odd control schemes for no reason. Want to aim down your sniper rifle's scope with the default controls in ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' or ''VideoGame/GhostRecon''? E and T key, respectively - right mouse instead enters BulletTime or makes you ''sprint''.
* WASD controls, again mostly in first-person shooters. This took even longer to become commonly accepted than mouselook, and many games as late as [[UsefulNotes/TheOughts 2000 or 2001]] still used the arrow keys (or, slightly better, the numeric pad) as their default movement keys, sometimes not even giving the player the option of changing them. It's slightly baffling that it took anyone this long to realize that WASD is where your left hand naturally rests on a keyboard [[note]](assuming you're not left-handed and your left hand rests on the mouse)[[/note]], and that it puts more than a dozen other keys within easy access of the same hand without having to move it away from movement, while arrow keys only get about nine other keys within easy access.
** This issue is probably linked to the previous one: in the days when all controls were on the keyboard, left-hand movement control was not needed.

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** A related issue is with what control the right-mouse button is used for. In the early days before SecondaryFire became common, right mouse would control all sorts of odd things depending on the game - even when secondary fire started becoming a thing, it would usually sooner be stuck on ''middle'' mouse than right. This even still bites as you start entering the TurnOfTheMillennium, where right mouse was had been standardized as of ''VideoGame/{{Unreal}}'' and ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' as ''the'' key for either secondary fire or or, after ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'', aiming down your weapon's sights, and some holdouts still insist on odd control schemes for no reason.reason other than an apparent attempt to justify playing it on a keyboard and mouse. Want to aim down your sniper rifle's scope with the default controls in ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' or ''VideoGame/GhostRecon''? E and T key, respectively - right mouse instead enters BulletTime or makes you ''sprint''.
* WASD controls, again mostly in first-person shooters. This took even longer to become commonly accepted than mouselook, and even after the strengths of WASD were demonstrated in [[TournamentPlay high-level]] ''Quake'' games in 1996/1997, many games as late as [[UsefulNotes/TheOughts 2000 or 2001]] still used the arrow keys (or, slightly better, the numeric pad) as their default movement keys, sometimes not even giving the player the option of changing them. It's slightly baffling that it took anyone this long to realize that WASD is where your left hand naturally rests on a keyboard [[note]](assuming (assuming you're not left-handed and using the mouse with your left hand rests on the mouse)[[/note]], hand), and that it puts more than a dozen other keys within easy access of the same hand without having to move it away from movement, while arrow keys only get about nine other keys within easy access.
** This issue is probably linked to the previous one: in the days when all controls were on the keyboard, specific left-hand movement control was not needed.needed, since both hands would be on the keyboard anyway.

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* You would think something as obvious as PointBuildSystem would be around from the very start of the tabletop RPG, given how much freedom it gives to player and how relatively easy to design it is. But for years the only way of making characters in various systems was to just randomly generate them by rolling dice. In some of the oldest game you couldn't even swap the dice outcome between various statistics, instead rolling them in sequence. Other had tables full of modifiers for different scenario types and classes to help with the outcome of rolls. Still got terrible stats in the end thanks to RandomNumberGod? Tough luck. More, the sheer concept of having an idea for your character first and then spreading skills, stats and what not to fit the concept was considered as ''cheating'' and sneered upon.

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