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* ''TabletopGame/MouseTrap''

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* ''TabletopGame/MouseTrap''''TabletopGame/MouseTrap1963''


* ''TabletopGame/ShardsOfStellmare''


* ''TabletopGame/TeamSpaceHobosRPG'' (followed by TabletopGame/ShardsOfStellmare)


* ''TabletopGame/ShardsOfStellmare'' (follow-up to TabletopGame/TeamSpaceHobosRPG)

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* ''TabletopGame/ShardsOfStellmare'' (follow-up to TabletopGame/TeamSpaceHobosRPG)''TabletopGame/ShardsOfStellmare''


* ''TabletopGame/MysteryDate''

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* ''TabletopGame/MysteryDate''''TabletopGame/MysteryDate1965''


Of course, the variety in gameplay is also enormous. Two aspects in which tabletop games can differ quite significantly are hidden information and [[RandomNumberGod random elements]]. For example, in chess, there is no hidden information and no randomness; everything is determined by the players' own actions, and everything in the game is revealed to both players. In ''TabletopGame/{{Stratego}}'' and ''TabletopGame/{{Diplomacy}}'', there are no random elements either, but the amount of hidden information is huge, and deceiving your opponent(s) is an important part of gameplay. In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_of_the_Goose Game of the Goose]], there is no hidden information, but the randomness is turned UpToEleven ''[[LuckBasedMission everything]]'' [[LuckBasedMission is random]], and players have zero control over the outcome of the game. Poker is a good example of a game that features both random elements (which cards you are dealt) and hidden information (your opponents' hands). Most games likewise have a little of both. There also exist games which incorporate other media in addition to the base content of the game, such as those which involve a [[UsefulNotes/{{VCR}} VHS tape]] or UsefulNotes/{{DVD}} to display in tandem with the physical game, introducing further elements and events during play.

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Of course, the variety in gameplay is also enormous. Two aspects in which tabletop games can differ quite significantly are hidden information and [[RandomNumberGod random elements]]. For example, in chess, there is no hidden information and no randomness; everything is determined by the players' own actions, and everything in the game is revealed to both players. In ''TabletopGame/{{Stratego}}'' and ''TabletopGame/{{Diplomacy}}'', there are no random elements either, but the amount of hidden information is huge, and deceiving your opponent(s) is an important part of gameplay. In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_of_the_Goose Game of the Goose]], there is no hidden information, but the randomness is turned UpToEleven up ''[[LuckBasedMission everything]]'' [[LuckBasedMission is random]], and players have zero control over the outcome of the game. Poker is a good example of a game that features both random elements (which cards you are dealt) and hidden information (your opponents' hands). Most games likewise have a little of both. There also exist games which incorporate other media in addition to the base content of the game, such as those which involve a [[UsefulNotes/{{VCR}} VHS tape]] or UsefulNotes/{{DVD}} to display in tandem with the physical game, introducing further elements and events during play.


* ''TabletopGame/{{Sorcerer}}''
* ''TabletopGame/{{Space 1889}}''

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Sorcerer}}''
''TabletopGame/Sorcerer2001''
* ''TabletopGame/{{Space 1889}}''''TabletopGame/Space1889''


* ''TabletopGame/{{Midnight}}''

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Midnight}}''''TabletopGame/Midnight2003''

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->''"The secret we should never let the {{Game Master}}s know is that they don't need any rules."''
-->-- '''Creator/GaryGygax'''

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Bang}}''


+ {{Legacy Game}}s

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+ {{Legacy Board Game}}s

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+ {{Legacy Game}}s

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+ {{Narrative Board Game}}s

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