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* [[https://www.rjrprops.com/ RJR Props]] creates [[https://www.cnn.com/style/article/rjr-props-fake-money/index.html two styles of prop money]]: "Standard grade" which looks real enough from a distance, and "high grade" which is so convincing up close that it is only printed on one side to keep anyone from spending it.

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* [[https://www.rjrprops.com/ RJR Props]] creates Props]], one of the leading providers of money props produces [[https://www.cnn.com/style/article/rjr-props-fake-money/index.html two styles of prop fake money]]: "Standard grade" which looks real enough from a distance, and "high grade" which is so more convincing up close that close, therefore it is only printed on one side to keep anyone from spending it.


* The {{VH1}} reality series ''Ton of Cash'' used this trope as a central feature. A group of 14 contestants received $1 million in prop $1 bills, bundled into 167 bricks that weighed 12 pounds each, and had to physically carry as much of it as they could through a series of challenges ranging from Malibu to Las Vegas.

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* The {{VH1}} [=VH1=] reality series ''Ton of Cash'' used this trope as a central feature. A group of 14 contestants received $1 million in prop $1 bills, bundled into 167 bricks that weighed 12 pounds each, and had to physically carry as much of it as they could through a series of challenges ranging from Malibu to Las Vegas.


* The VH1 reality series ''Ton of Cash'' used this trope as a central feature. A group of 14 contestants received $1 million in prop $1 bills, bundled into 167 bricks that weighed 12 pounds each, and had to physically carry as much of it as they could through a series of challenges ranging from Malibu to Las Vegas.

to:

* The VH1 {{VH1}} reality series ''Ton of Cash'' used this trope as a central feature. A group of 14 contestants received $1 million in prop $1 bills, bundled into 167 bricks that weighed 12 pounds each, and had to physically carry as much of it as they could through a series of challenges ranging from Malibu to Las Vegas.



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* The VH1 reality series ''Ton of Cash'' used this trope as a central feature. A group of 14 contestants received $1 million in prop $1 bills, bundled into 167 bricks that weighed 12 pounds each, and had to physically carry as much of it as they could through a series of challenges ranging from Malibu to Las Vegas.



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* ''Series/MrBean'': In the spin-off book ''Mr Bean's Diary'', there is Mr Bean's hand-drawn picture of a £10 note, with "ten pouns" (sic) written on it. Below this, it says: photocopy this ten million times, then SPEND it."


* [[https://www.rjrprops.com/ RJR Props]] creates [[https://www.cnn.com/style/article/rjr-props-fake-money/index.html two styles of prop money]]: "Standard grade" which looks real enough from a distance, and "high grade" which are much more convincing up close but are only printed on one side.

to:

* [[https://www.rjrprops.com/ RJR Props]] creates [[https://www.cnn.com/style/article/rjr-props-fake-money/index.html two styles of prop money]]: "Standard grade" which looks real enough from a distance, and "high grade" which are much more is so convincing up close but are that it is only printed on one side.side to keep anyone from spending it.


[[folder: Western Animation ]]

* In WesternAnimation/TheBeatles episode "Money," John sews the boys' concert take in Ringo's pocket while they tour Coney Island. Ringo is followed by a mysterious stranger and loses the money during a chase. The stranger turned out to be George, [[YankTheDogsChain yanking Ringo's chain]]. John reveals that he kept the real money and sewed stage money in Ringo's pocket. But when John takes out the stack from his own pocket, it turns out to be the stage money.
-->'''Ringo:''' (''tossing the stage money in the air'') Very droll.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheDickTracyShow'' episode "Funny Money" has Hemlock Holmes busting a gut chasing Stooge Viller and Mumbles, who have stolen some theater receipts only to find out at the end it was stage money.

[[/folder]]



* [[https://www.rjrprops.com/ RJR Props]] creates [[https://www.cnn.com/style/article/rjr-props-fake-money/index.html two styles of prop money]]: "Standard grade" which looks real enough from a distance, and "high grade" which are much more convincing up close but are only printed on one side.




[[folder: Western Animation ]]

* In WesternAnimation/TheBeatles episode "Money," John sews the boys' concert take in Ringo's pocket while they tour Coney Island. Ringo is followed by a mysterious stranger and loses the money during a chase. The stranger turned out to be George, [[YankTheDogsChain yanking Ringo's chain]]. John reveals that he kept the real money and sewed stage money in Ringo's pocket. But when John takes out the stack from his own pocket, it turns out to be the stage money.
-->'''Ringo:''' (''tossing the stage money in the air'') Very droll.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheDickTracyShow'' episode "Funny Money" has Hemlock Holmes busting a gut chasing Stooge Viller and Mumbles, who have stolen some theater receipts only to find out at the end it was stage money.

[[/folder]]


* In ''Discworld/MakingMoney'', the ''Ankh-Morpork Times'' broke the story of Moist von Lipwig's new invention, paper currency, by averting this trope. They printed true-to-scale images of the front and back of a bank note, which (as Vetinari observes) surely sent most of the city scrambling for scissors and glue.

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* In ''Discworld/MakingMoney'', ''Literature/MakingMoney'', the ''Ankh-Morpork Times'' broke the story of Moist von Lipwig's new invention, paper currency, by averting this trope. They printed true-to-scale images of the front and back of a bank note, which (as Vetinari observes) surely sent most of the city scrambling for scissors and glue.



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* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'', being a show about criminals, naturally has quite a bit of this. One commentary has director Creator/JonathanFrakes mention that the prop master asked him if he wanted to use to use "the good money" for the episode. Producer Dean Devlin indignantly pointed out that, as a con and heist show, they have a lot of briefcases full of money.



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* In ''Literature/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'', Erik (the titular Phantom) demands 20,000 francs per month from the managers of the opera house. They put the money in an envelope and give it to the head usher, who has a duplicate (provided by Erik) up her sleeve that contains stage money. She puts the duplicate in Erik's private box and slips the real one into the back pocket of a manager's dress-coat while he is wearing it. When the managers return to their office, Erik sneaks the money out of that pocket by way of a trapdoor built into the floor.



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* ''Series/CutthroatKitchen'' made use of this trope. At the start of every episode, the four competing chefs were each given $25,000 in prop money (with host Alton Brown's picture) to use in bidding on sabotage items.


* The Creator/StephenSondheim musical ''Road Show'' involved piles of cash being literally thrown into the air until they carpeted the stage, so that audience members in the front few rows were able to catch loose bills. Needless to say, it wasn't real money.

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* The Creator/StephenSondheim Music/StephenSondheim musical ''Road Show'' involved piles of cash being literally thrown into the air until they carpeted the stage, so that audience members in the front few rows were able to catch loose bills. Needless to say, it wasn't real money.



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** This trick is difficult to pull off successfully with currency from countries such as Australia, England and Canada (to name just three) because the different denominations are not only slightly different sizes, but also different colours.

Added DiffLines:

** Modern anti-counterfeiting laws no longer follow this limited definition of "forging" but instead focus on whether or not the "currency" is likely to fool a person into believing it's real. In court, the fact that a person was fooled into believing that fake notes were real would be taken to be evidence that the notes are counterfeit and illegal, regardless of any minor differences between the fakes and the real thing.
** Additionally, even passing off fake currency as the real thing is generally illegal, regardless of how transparently fake the forged notes may appear to be. After all, the person receiving the notes may be a visitor from another country and therefore unfamiliar with what local money looks like.


* In WesternAnimation/TheBeatles episode "Money," John sews the boys' concert take in Ringo's pocket while they tour Coney Island. Ringo is followed by a mysterious stranger and loses the money during a chase. The stranger turned out to be George, [[YankTheDogsChain yanking Ringo's chain]]. John reveals that he kept the real money and sewed stage money in Ringo's pocket. But when John takes out the wad from his own pocket, it turns out to be the stage money.

to:

* In WesternAnimation/TheBeatles episode "Money," John sews the boys' concert take in Ringo's pocket while they tour Coney Island. Ringo is followed by a mysterious stranger and loses the money during a chase. The stranger turned out to be George, [[YankTheDogsChain yanking Ringo's chain]]. John reveals that he kept the real money and sewed stage money in Ringo's pocket. But when John takes out the wad stack from his own pocket, it turns out to be the stage money.

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