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[[folder:Platform Games]]
* ''VideoGame/Ghost10'' has five skill trees where the player can spend skill points to unlock various perks. Each perk provides an active or passive benefit, and also increases an attribute associated with its corresponding tree: Chassis perks increase Ghostís max HP, Boogan perks increase her maximum ammo, Jacker perks increase Jackerís hacking speed, Ghost perks increase the damage output of possessed robots, and Nakamura perks increase the drop rate for health kits.
[[/folder]]


* ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' has a hybrid skill score/perk system wherein "talents" encompass both passive (armor, weapon) and active (biotic & tech attacks) skills. Talents can be leveled up multiple times, increasing their efficiency and unlocking additional perks and even further upgradeable talents at certain levels (forming an implicit skill tree). ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' and ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' replace them with "powers"--active combat skills, which are essentially perks with up to five (mutually exclusive at level 4+) upgrades available for each of them. Most talents and powers depend on the character's class and are available from the start, but some are only unlocked after certain story events.

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* ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' has a hybrid skill score/perk system wherein "talents" encompass both passive (armor, weapon) and active (biotic & tech attacks) skills. Talents can be leveled up multiple times, increasing their efficiency and unlocking additional perks and even further upgradeable talents at certain levels (forming an implicit skill tree).tree); [[MultiplePersuasionModes Charm and Intimidate]] talents are additionally capped by your current [[KarmaMeter Paragon and Renegade]] scores, respectively. ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' and ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' replace them with "powers"--active combat skills, which are essentially perks with up to five (mutually exclusive at level 4+) upgrades available for each of them. Most talents and powers depend on the character's class and are available from the start, but some are only unlocked after certain story events.


!!Tabletop game examples:

* ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' is a classic example. Character traits fall fundamentally into four distinct groups: attributes (the four base stats), skills (based on said attributes and then improved individually), advantages (perks) and disadvantages (essentially 'anti-perks', handicaps to saddle one's character with for more character depth and bonus points...[[BluntYes okay, primarily the bonus points]]).
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' was late to this particular party for once. The now-familiar skills-and-feats scheme was introduced only with the game's third edition; before then, support for skills for non-thief characters was noticeably delegated to optional rules or even altogether absent, and "perks" existed almost solely in the form of racial and class abilities that might get unlocked with advancing level but generally didn't involve much choice. Moreover, both pre- and post-third edition these skills were and are handled more like perks themselves, with characters able to choose to have a given skill or not but little in the way of means to improve it ''further'' after that. The fifth edition made feats an optional mechanic that replaces generic stat increases and reduced their selection, while giving each feat additional properties, so they are no longer detached abilities or bonuses but entire expansion packs for the character.
* Both the [[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Storyteller]] and the [[TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness Storytelling System]] are based around "traits", which are basically a hybrid mash-up of stats ("attributes"), skill scores ("abilities" in oWoD, "skills" in nWoD), and upgradable perks ("advantages"). The latter include both storyline perks (like background) and active abilities (like the [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampiric Disciplines]]). Attribute scores range from 1 to 5, abilities/skills and advantages from 0 to 5. Occasionally, levels up to 10 may be allowed. Trait levels are [[PointBuildSystem acquired by spending character points]].
* The ''Film/{{Serenity}} Role Playing Game'' has a nontraditional version of this. Skills and perks are purchased from a shared point pool at character creation and changeable at GM discretion (the RPG does not use a ClassAndLevelSystem). There's a set of core skills that can be used with UsefulNotes/{{dice}} up to d6, then specialized into sub-skills that can use from d8 to d12+d2. Perks, called traits, are broken down into assets and complications and provide various bonuses and penalties.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Ironclaw}}'' has skills and Gifts, adding skill marks increasing the size of the dice rolled. The biggest changes between editions included the consolidation of several skills and changing many specific skills to Gifts, as well as instituting flat costs of 4 XP per skill mark and 10 XP per Gift rather than varying costs, and making spells Gifts.
* ''TabletopGame/DragonAge'' features Focuses and Talents, which vaguely correspond to Feats and Skill Scores. Focuses represent a particular expertise in a narrower subset of certain [[TheSixStats Attribute]] checks (e.g. "Perception: Seeing") and give a flat +2 bonus to rolls where they apply. Talents have three levels, each of which gives the character a unique gameplay advantage. New Focuses can be learned at every new level (alternating between primary and secondary class Attributes), while Talents can be acquired or upgraded every other level.
* ''TabletopGame/ApocalypseWorld'' and its many hacks use a unique variation of perks called "moves": apart from the "basic moves" available to all player characters (which describe which {{stat|s}} to roll for in specific situations and what the roll results mean), each additional move is character/playbook-specific and can range from switching out stats in basic moves (e.g. "roll for intelligence instead of charisma when trying to manipulate someone") to giving them entirely new abilities. The design is purposefully open-ended to allow seamless invention and integration of new moves into play.
* ''TabletopGame/LaceAndSteel'' has a large number of skill scores subdivided into Social, Courtly, Knowledge, Military, Movement/Perception, Crafting, and Magical categories (but no perks). To use a skill, you need at least level 0 (no modifier) in it, which you get for free in a handful of universal skills, plus in a number of skills associated with your social class (e.g. nobles get free Social and Courtly skills). You can buy additional skill levels (including level 0 in new skills) with TechPoints at character creation to increase the bonus to corresponding rolls, although non-class skill levels cost more than class ones, and higher levels cost more than lower levels. In-play, however, skill levels are gained via StatGrinding: at the end of an adventure you roll for every skill you've used in its course to gain XP in it, increasing it by a level if you reach that level's cost (same as at character creation).
* ''Fate'' games have a variety of different ways to ''refer to'' its Skill Scores (most have Skills, but Fate Accelerated uses Approaches instead, while ''Jadepunk'' has Professions) and even a couple of different names for Perks (most use Stunts, but ''Jadepunk'' has an Asset system instead that modifies the Stunt basis), but most of them exhibit this. Some also have a third thing, Extras, used to build things like magic systems, super-powers, or giant robots.
* ''TabletopGame/PlanetMercenary'' has 40 Skills, most which have Specialties that allow for rerolling one of the three dice when using a subset of the skill. [[spoiler:Carbosilicate Amorphs get additional secret Specialties that unlock actual abilities]].

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!!Tabletop game examples:

* ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' is a classic example. Character traits fall fundamentally into four distinct groups: attributes (the four base stats), skills (based on said attributes and then improved individually), advantages (perks) and disadvantages (essentially 'anti-perks', handicaps to saddle one's character with for more character depth and bonus points...[[BluntYes okay, primarily the bonus points]]).
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' was late to this particular party for once. The now-familiar skills-and-feats scheme was introduced only with the game's third edition; before then, support for skills for non-thief characters was noticeably delegated to optional rules or even altogether absent, and "perks" existed almost solely in the form of racial and class abilities that might get unlocked with advancing level but generally didn't involve much choice. Moreover, both pre- and post-third edition these skills were and are handled more like perks themselves, with characters able to choose to have a given skill or not but little in the way of means to improve it ''further'' after that. The fifth edition made feats an optional mechanic that replaces generic stat increases and reduced their selection, while giving each feat additional properties, so they are no longer detached abilities or bonuses but entire expansion packs for the character.
* Both the [[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Storyteller]] and the [[TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness Storytelling System]] are based around "traits", which are basically a hybrid mash-up of stats ("attributes"), skill scores ("abilities" in oWoD, "skills" in nWoD), and upgradable perks ("advantages"). The latter include both storyline perks (like background) and active abilities (like the [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampiric Disciplines]]). Attribute scores range from 1 to 5, abilities/skills and advantages from 0 to 5. Occasionally, levels up to 10 may be allowed. Trait levels are [[PointBuildSystem acquired by spending character points]].
* The ''Film/{{Serenity}} Role Playing Game'' has a nontraditional version of this. Skills and perks are purchased from a shared point pool at character creation and changeable at GM discretion (the RPG does not use a ClassAndLevelSystem). There's a set of core skills that can be used with UsefulNotes/{{dice}} up to d6, then specialized into sub-skills that can use from d8 to d12+d2. Perks, called traits, are broken down into assets and complications and provide various bonuses and penalties.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Ironclaw}}'' has skills and Gifts, adding skill marks increasing the size of the dice rolled. The biggest changes between editions included the consolidation of several skills and changing many specific skills to Gifts, as well as instituting flat costs of 4 XP per skill mark and 10 XP per Gift rather than varying costs, and making spells Gifts.
* ''TabletopGame/DragonAge'' features Focuses and Talents, which vaguely correspond to Feats and Skill Scores. Focuses represent a particular expertise in a narrower subset of certain [[TheSixStats Attribute]] checks (e.g. "Perception: Seeing") and give a flat +2 bonus to rolls where they apply. Talents have three levels, each of which gives the character a unique gameplay advantage. New Focuses can be learned at every new level (alternating between primary and secondary class Attributes), while Talents can be acquired or upgraded every other level.
* ''TabletopGame/ApocalypseWorld'' and its many hacks use a unique variation of perks called "moves": apart from the "basic moves" available to all player characters (which describe which {{stat|s}} to roll for in specific situations and what the roll results mean), each additional move is character/playbook-specific and can range from switching out stats in basic moves (e.g. "roll for intelligence instead of charisma when trying to manipulate someone") to giving them entirely new abilities. The design is purposefully open-ended to allow seamless invention and integration of new moves into play.
* ''TabletopGame/LaceAndSteel'' has a large number of skill scores subdivided into Social, Courtly, Knowledge, Military, Movement/Perception, Crafting, and Magical categories (but no perks). To use a skill, you need at least level 0 (no modifier) in it, which you get for free in a handful of universal skills, plus in a number of skills associated with your social class (e.g. nobles get free Social and Courtly skills). You can buy additional skill levels (including level 0 in new skills) with TechPoints at character creation to increase the bonus to corresponding rolls, although non-class skill levels cost more than class ones, and higher levels cost more than lower levels. In-play, however, skill levels are gained via StatGrinding: at the end of an adventure you roll for every skill you've used in its course to gain XP in it, increasing it by a level if you reach that level's cost (same as at character creation).
* ''Fate'' games have a variety of different ways to ''refer to'' its Skill Scores (most have Skills, but Fate Accelerated uses Approaches instead, while ''Jadepunk'' has Professions) and even a couple of different names for Perks (most use Stunts, but ''Jadepunk'' has an Asset system instead that modifies the Stunt basis), but most of them exhibit this. Some also have a third thing, Extras, used to build things like magic systems, super-powers, or giant robots.
* ''TabletopGame/PlanetMercenary'' has 40 Skills, most which have Specialties that allow for rerolling one of the three dice when using a subset of the skill. [[spoiler:Carbosilicate Amorphs get additional secret Specialties that unlock actual abilities]].


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[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' is a classic example. Character traits fall fundamentally into four distinct groups: attributes (the four base stats), skills (based on said attributes and then improved individually), advantages (perks) and disadvantages (essentially 'anti-perks', handicaps to saddle one's character with for more character depth and bonus points...[[BluntYes okay, primarily the bonus points]]).
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' was late to this particular party for once. The now-familiar skills-and-feats scheme was introduced only with the game's third edition; before then, support for skills for non-thief characters was noticeably delegated to optional rules or even altogether absent, and "perks" existed almost solely in the form of racial and class abilities that might get unlocked with advancing level but generally didn't involve much choice. Moreover, both pre- and post-third edition these skills were and are handled more like perks themselves, with characters able to choose to have a given skill or not but little in the way of means to improve it ''further'' after that. The fifth edition made feats an optional mechanic that replaces generic stat increases and reduced their selection, while giving each feat additional properties, so they are no longer detached abilities or bonuses but entire expansion packs for the character.
* Both the [[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Storyteller]] and the [[TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness Storytelling System]] are based around "traits", which are basically a hybrid mash-up of stats ("attributes"), skill scores ("abilities" in oWoD, "skills" in nWoD), and upgradable perks ("advantages"). The latter include both storyline perks (like background) and active abilities (like the [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampiric Disciplines]]). Attribute scores range from 1 to 5, abilities/skills and advantages from 0 to 5. Occasionally, levels up to 10 may be allowed. Trait levels are [[PointBuildSystem acquired by spending character points]].
* The ''Film/{{Serenity}} Role Playing Game'' has a nontraditional version of this. Skills and perks are purchased from a shared point pool at character creation and changeable at GM discretion (the RPG does not use a ClassAndLevelSystem). There's a set of core skills that can be used with UsefulNotes/{{dice}} up to d6, then specialized into sub-skills that can use from d8 to d12+d2. Perks, called traits, are broken down into assets and complications and provide various bonuses and penalties.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Ironclaw}}'' has skills and Gifts, adding skill marks increasing the size of the dice rolled. The biggest changes between editions included the consolidation of several skills and changing many specific skills to Gifts, as well as instituting flat costs of 4 XP per skill mark and 10 XP per Gift rather than varying costs, and making spells Gifts.
* ''TabletopGame/DragonAge'' features Focuses and Talents, which vaguely correspond to Feats and Skill Scores. Focuses represent a particular expertise in a narrower subset of certain [[TheSixStats Attribute]] checks (e.g. "Perception: Seeing") and give a flat +2 bonus to rolls where they apply. Talents have three levels, each of which gives the character a unique gameplay advantage. New Focuses can be learned at every new level (alternating between primary and secondary class Attributes), while Talents can be acquired or upgraded every other level.
* ''TabletopGame/ApocalypseWorld'' and its many hacks use a unique variation of perks called "moves": apart from the "basic moves" available to all player characters (which describe which {{stat|s}} to roll for in specific situations and what the roll results mean), each additional move is character/playbook-specific and can range from switching out stats in basic moves (e.g. "roll for intelligence instead of charisma when trying to manipulate someone") to giving them entirely new abilities. The design is purposefully open-ended to allow seamless invention and integration of new moves into play.
* ''TabletopGame/LaceAndSteel'' has a large number of skill scores subdivided into Social, Courtly, Knowledge, Military, Movement/Perception, Crafting, and Magical categories (but no perks). To use a skill, you need at least level 0 (no modifier) in it, which you get for free in a handful of universal skills, plus in a number of skills associated with your social class (e.g. nobles get free Social and Courtly skills). You can buy additional skill levels (including level 0 in new skills) with TechPoints at character creation to increase the bonus to corresponding rolls, although non-class skill levels cost more than class ones, and higher levels cost more than lower levels. In-play, however, skill levels are gained via StatGrinding: at the end of an adventure you roll for every skill you've used in its course to gain XP in it, increasing it by a level if you reach that level's cost (same as at character creation).
* ''Fate'' games have a variety of different ways to ''refer to'' its Skill Scores (most have Skills, but Fate Accelerated uses Approaches instead, while ''Jadepunk'' has Professions) and even a couple of different names for Perks (most use Stunts, but ''Jadepunk'' has an Asset system instead that modifies the Stunt basis), but most of them exhibit this. Some also have a third thing, Extras, used to build things like magic systems, super-powers, or giant robots.
* ''TabletopGame/PlanetMercenary'' has 40 Skills, most which have Specialties that allow for rerolling one of the three dice when using a subset of the skill. [[spoiler:Carbosilicate Amorphs get additional secret Specialties that unlock actual abilities]].
[[/folder]]


In RealLife, the human brain acquires new knowledge and puts it to use via a spectacular cascade of electrochemical reactions taking place across a heavily networked biological cell grid. Learning and improving one's skills is a continuous, life-long process, while expertise in one field often proves [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transfer_of_learning unexpectedly useful]] in other, seemingly unrelated domains. But complex neuroscience has no place in video games, because a) it violates the RuleOfFun, b) [[GeniusProgramming programming]] [[ArtificialBrilliance such a system]] [[ArtificialStupidity is next-to impossible]], and c) [[BreadEggsMilkSquick it runs a high risk of spawning]] [[AIIsACrapshoot a murderous AI on your computer]].

to:

In RealLife, the human brain acquires new knowledge and puts it to use via a spectacular cascade of electrochemical reactions taking place across a heavily networked biological cell grid. Learning and improving one's skills is a continuous, life-long process, while expertise in one field often proves [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transfer_of_learning unexpectedly useful]] in other, seemingly unrelated domains. But complex neuroscience has no place in video games, because a) it violates the RuleOfFun, b) [[GeniusProgramming [[SugarWiki/GeniusProgramming programming]] [[ArtificialBrilliance such a system]] [[ArtificialStupidity is next-to impossible]], and c) [[BreadEggsMilkSquick it runs a high risk of spawning]] [[AIIsACrapshoot a murderous AI on your computer]].


* The original ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' features both skill scores and perks (dubbed "augmentations"). Skill scores are upgraded using [[PointBuildSystem skill points acquired from completing missions]], have four levels (Untrained, Trained, Advanced, Master), and improve your performance with different types of weapons, or non-combat actions (lock-picking, electronics, medicine, etc.). Augmentations are picked up as items on missions and implanted into Denton's body slots, giving him new abilities. They can likewise be upgraded. ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'' does away with skill scores and instead translates experience points into Praxis Points, which in turn can be invested into any augmentation unlocked in the perk tree (justified by that all augs are already built into Jensen and only need to be activated).

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* The original ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' features both skill scores and perks (dubbed "augmentations"). Skill scores are upgraded using [[PointBuildSystem skill points acquired from in small heaps by completing missions]], objectives]], have four levels (Untrained, Trained, Advanced, Master), and improve your performance with different types of weapons, or non-combat actions (lock-picking, electronics, medicine, etc.). Augmentations are picked up as items on missions and implanted into Denton's body slots, giving him new abilities. They abilities, and can likewise be upgraded. upgraded up to level four with "upgrade canisters".
*
''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'' does away with merges the two subsystems from the original game: you don't have any skill scores anymore, but still gain small heaps of "Praxis Points" here and instead translates experience points into Praxis Points, there, with which in turn can be invested into any augmentation unlocked in you directly unlock individual augmentations from the perk tree TechTree (justified by that all augs are already built into Jensen and only need to be activated).

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* ''VideoGame/WorldOfTanks'' has skills and perks available for tank crew members on reaching 100% of their primary qualification. Skills take effect immediately while perks only take effect on reaching 100%. Most provide major benefits, with some, such as Sixth Sense for the commander (alerting when spotted, with three seconds delay), being considered OneStatToRuleThemAll, while others are considered a DumpStat due to CripplingOverspecialization from being only useful on some tanks or in select circumstances, being made redundant by equipment or provide too little benefit to begin with.


|| Each skill levels "unlocks" the next one, but\\

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|| Each skill levels level "unlocks" the next one, but\\

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* In ''VideoGame/ForeverHome'', characters can spend PP to learn and upgrade skills. The complete list of skills aren't available until the characters pass experience level thresholds though.


* ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' has a hybrid skill score/perk system wherein "talents" encompass both passive (armor, weapon) and active (biotic attacks) skills. Talents can be leveled up multiple times, increasing their efficiency and unlocking additional perks and even further upgradeable talents at certain levels (forming an implicit skill tree). ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' and ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' replace them with "powers"--active combat skills, which are essentially perks with up to five (mutually exclusive at level 4+) upgrades available for each of them. Most talents and powers depend on the character's class and are available from the start, but some are only unlocked after certain story events.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' has a hybrid skill score/perk system wherein "talents" encompass both passive (armor, weapon) and active (biotic & tech attacks) skills. Talents can be leveled up multiple times, increasing their efficiency and unlocking additional perks and even further upgradeable talents at certain levels (forming an implicit skill tree). ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' and ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' replace them with "powers"--active combat skills, which are essentially perks with up to five (mutually exclusive at level 4+) upgrades available for each of them. Most talents and powers depend on the character's class and are available from the start, but some are only unlocked after certain story events.


* The underlying game system of ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series is based mainly around skill scores, which are [[StatGrinding increased by using them]] (which also indirectly increases their governing character stats), but ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' added a number of perks, which are unlocked by reaching certain levels in skills: e.g. a Power Attack at Blade 25, no shield wear-out at Shield 50, jumping off water surface at Acrobatics 100, etc. ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' expands the available perks to an entire tree (one per skill score); perks now have prerequisite perks and corresponding skill score levels and can be bought and upgraded with perk points (gained with every level up) once unlocked.

to:

* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':
**
The underlying game system of ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series is based mainly around skill scores, which are [[StatGrinding increased by using them]] (which also indirectly increases their governing character stats), but first four games in the main series[[note]]''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' added a number Oblivion]]''[[/note]] all have similar variations of perks, a ClassAndLevelSystem, with a few quirks varying by game. ''Oblivion'', while still staying in line with the series' traditional system, adds Perks for the first time, which are unlocked by reaching certain levels in skills: e.g. a Power Attack at Blade 25, no shield wear-out at Shield Block 50, jumping off water surface at Acrobatics 100, etc. etc.
**
''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' expands overhauls the series' system, doing away with classes and attributes entirely while moving into the territory of this trope. It loosely borrows the Perk system of its Creator/{{Bethesda}} ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' sister series, expanding the available perks to an entire tree (one per skill score); perks now have prerequisite perks and corresponding skill score levels and can be bought and upgraded with perk points (gained with every level CharacterLevel up) once unlocked.

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* ''TabletopGame/PlanetMercenary'' has 40 Skills, most which have Specialties that allow for rerolling one of the three dice when using a subset of the skill. [[spoiler:Carbosilicate Amorphs get additional secret Specialties that unlock actual abilities]].

Added DiffLines:

* ''Fate'' games have a variety of different ways to ''refer to'' its Skill Scores (most have Skills, but Fate Accelerated uses Approaches instead, while ''Jadepunk'' has Professions) and even a couple of different names for Perks (most use Stunts, but ''Jadepunk'' has an Asset system instead that modifies the Stunt basis), but most of them exhibit this. Some also have a third thing, Extras, used to build things like magic systems, super-powers, or giant robots.

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* In ''VideoGame/CapellasPromise'', characters can spend SP to learn and level up different Specialties, allowing them to learn new skills. However, each time a Specialty's level is raised, the cost for all specialties go up to discourage too much skill diversity.


In RealLife, the human brain acquires new knowledge and puts it to use via a spectacular cascade of electrochemical reactions taking place across a heavily networked biological cell grid. Learning and improving one's skills is a continuous, life-long process, while expertise in one field often proves unexpectedly useful in other, seemingly unrelated domains. But complex neuroscience has no place in video games, because a) it violates the RuleOfFun, b) [[GeniusProgramming programming]] [[ArtificialBrilliance such a system]] [[ArtificialStupidity is next-to impossible]], and c) [[BreadEggsMilkSquick it runs a high risk of spawning]] [[AIIsACrapshoot a murderous AI on your computer]].

to:

In RealLife, the human brain acquires new knowledge and puts it to use via a spectacular cascade of electrochemical reactions taking place across a heavily networked biological cell grid. Learning and improving one's skills is a continuous, life-long process, while expertise in one field often proves [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transfer_of_learning unexpectedly useful useful]] in other, seemingly unrelated domains. But complex neuroscience has no place in video games, because a) it violates the RuleOfFun, b) [[GeniusProgramming programming]] [[ArtificialBrilliance such a system]] [[ArtificialStupidity is next-to impossible]], and c) [[BreadEggsMilkSquick it runs a high risk of spawning]] [[AIIsACrapshoot a murderous AI on your computer]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{Tyranny}}'' has skills, which are increased by use or increasing the associated attributes at level-up, and talents, one point of which are gotten every level and which are divided into trees.

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