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* The cover art for Music/{{Meco}}'s "Star Wars and Other Galactic Funk" album from 1977, even though ''Film/StarWars'' itself was a deliberate aversion of this trope.

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* The cover art for Music/{{Meco}}'s "Star Wars and Other Galactic Funk" album from 1977, even though ''Film/StarWars'' ''[[Film/ANewHope Star Wars]]'' itself was a deliberate aversion of this trope.


* ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'':

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* ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'':''Literature/Foundation1951'':

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** Starting with "Literature/TheEncyclopedists", characters have a variety of new devices that are essentially older technology with a smaller energy source, called 'atomics'. As the decades pass, they continue nuclear miniaturization, and in "Literature/TheTraders" and "Literature/TheMerchantPrinces", start calling such devices 'nucleics'. The ([[VestigialEmpire collapsing]]) Empire uses generators the size of large buildings, while the Foundation creates generators the size of a pocketwatch.


* "Literature/TheMayors": Their futuristic weapons are called atomic blasters, and ships use hyperatomic motors.

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* ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'':
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"Literature/TheMayors": Their futuristic weapons are called atomic blasters, and ships use hyperatomic motors.motors.
** "Literature/TheTraders": This story starts going into detail about the sort of atom-powered devices that the Foundation has been building since Mayor Hardin proved that Terminus ruled the Four Kingdoms, rather than the other way around. They've made knives that generate a force-field blade, mechanical garbage disposers, and even transmutation machines (actually a modified food irradiation chamber, like a microwave oven).

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* ''VideoGame/TheOuterWorlds'' has Art Deco designs and garish neon colors everywhere. The game's aesthetic could best be described as this trope getting mixed with Used Future and Cassette Futurism elements.

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* "Literature/TheMayors": Their futuristic weapons are called atomic blasters, and ships use hyperatomic motors.


* Several Creator/DCComics characters who live in between the present era and the CrystalSpiresAndTogas era of the Comicbook/{{Legion Of Super-Heroes}}, including Tommy Tomorrow and the Planeteers, the Knights of the Galaxy, Ultra the Multi-Alien, Space Ranger, and Space Cabbie. ComicBook/AdamStrange does this in present time.
** Adam Strange appeared in some Comicbook/{{Starman}} comics and fit in very well because the title already had a certain Raygun Gothic aesthetic.

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* Several Creator/DCComics characters who live in between the present era and the CrystalSpiresAndTogas era of the Comicbook/{{Legion Of Super-Heroes}}, including Tommy Tomorrow and the Planeteers, the Knights of the Galaxy, Ultra the Multi-Alien, Space Ranger, and Space Cabbie. ComicBook/AdamStrange does this in the present time.
** Adam Strange also appeared in some Comicbook/{{Starman}} comics and fit fitted in very well because the title already had a certain Raygun Gothic aesthetic.



* ''ComicStrip/DanDare''.
* Weird Science by Creator/ECComics had a lot of streamlined rocketships and cool futuristic tech, especially Wally Wood's work.

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* ''ComicStrip/DanDare''.
''ComicStrip/DanDare'' was created as the 1950s British archetype of the trope.
* Weird Science ''Weird Science'' by Creator/ECComics had a lot of streamlined rocketships and cool futuristic tech, especially Wally Wood's work.



* UsefulNotes/{{The Silver Age|of Comic Books}} ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' stories often have several Raygun Gothic elements.

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* UsefulNotes/{{The Silver Age|of Comic Books}} ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' stories often have several Raygun Gothic elements.



** ''[[http://www.warehouse23.com/products/gurps-steampunk-1-settings-and-style GURPS Steampunk 1]]'' discusses Raygun Gothic by name, primarily as a visual style that follows on directly from the end of the {{steampunk}} period, and which is in fact the basis for some "steampunk" costumes and visual designs.

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** ''[[http://www.warehouse23.com/products/gurps-steampunk-1-settings-and-style GURPS Steampunk 1]]'' discusses Raygun Gothic by name, primarily as a visual style that follows on directly from the end of the {{steampunk}} period, and which is in fact the basis for some modern "steampunk" costumes and visual designs.designs. The two subsequent volumes in the series build on this, providing examples of Raygun Gothic equipment and character types.


* UsefulNotes/{{The Silver Age|of Comic Books}} ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' stories often have several RayGunGothic elements.
* ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' takes place in a parallel universe where all fiction is true, so the aesthetics of the world shift in every time period to match the aesthetics of that time period's pop culture. Appropriately, the first two volumes (which take place in the late Victorian era) have a pronounced {{Steampunk}} vibe, whereas the standalone graphic novel ''The Black Dossier'' (which shifts the action to the 1950s) changes this to RaygunGothic.

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* UsefulNotes/{{The Silver Age|of Comic Books}} ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' stories often have several RayGunGothic Raygun Gothic elements.
* ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' takes place in a parallel universe where all fiction is true, so the aesthetics of the world shift in every time period to match the aesthetics of that time period's pop culture. Appropriately, the first two volumes (which take place in the late Victorian era) have a pronounced {{Steampunk}} vibe, whereas the standalone graphic novel ''The Black Dossier'' (which shifts the action to the 1950s) changes this to RaygunGothic.Raygun Gothic.



** ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' itself is an inversion of this trope, using the RaygunGothic style as a backdrop for a CrapsaccharineWorld where what would normally be helpful technology is instead [[EverythingTryingToKillYou trying to kill you]].

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** ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' itself is an inversion of this trope, using the RaygunGothic semi-Raygun Gothic style as a backdrop for a CrapsaccharineWorld where what would normally be helpful technology is instead [[EverythingTryingToKillYou trying to kill you]].



* Subverted by architect [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Calatrava#Recent_projects Santiago Calatrava,]] whose High-tech architectural style buildings resemble RaygunGothic but still manage to look somehow modern.

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* Subverted by architect [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Calatrava#Recent_projects Santiago Calatrava,]] whose High-tech architectural style buildings resemble RaygunGothic Raygun Gothic but still manage to look somehow modern.


* [[http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/ Atomic Rockets]] is a website that starts with this trope, but uses it as a launchpad to explore very hard science-fiction ideas about space flight. It refers to "raygun gothic" as "rocketpunk", to follow "steampunk" and "dieselpunk".

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* [[http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/ Atomic Rockets]] Website/AtomicRockets is a website that starts with this trope, but uses it as a launchpad to explore very hard science-fiction ideas about space flight. It refers to "raygun gothic" as "rocketpunk", to follow "steampunk" and "dieselpunk".


* One of the styles used by {{Mad Scientist}}s in ''TabletopGame/GeniusTheTransgression''.

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* One of the styles used by {{Mad Scientist}}s in ''TabletopGame/GeniusTheTransgression''. It's seen some tarnishing due to its use by two [[TheConspiracy Lemurian Baramins]], so it might elicit confusion among Peerage Geniuses, but sometimes all you really want is a bubble-helmet spacesuit and a raygun.


* The TropeNamer, William Gibson's "The Gernsback Continuum", is about a freelance photographer hired to take pictures of buildings inspired by this aesthetic, who either slowly finds himself being sucked into an alternate timeline where it was all {{Canon}} or is [[UnreliableNarrator hallucinating the whole thing.]]

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* The TropeNamer, William Gibson's "The Gernsback Continuum", is about a freelance photographer hired to take pictures of buildings inspired by this aesthetic, who either slowly finds himself being sucked into an alternate timeline where it was all {{Canon}} real or is [[UnreliableNarrator hallucinating the whole thing.]]



* The Zombie missions in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar'' qualify.

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* The Zombie missions in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar'' qualify.''VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar''.


* ''Series/DoctorWho'', especially in its earlier seasons (as they were made in the early 1960s). This particularly leads to ZeerustCanon, as the look of the inside of the TARDIS (particularly the a big hexagonal console with a glass column that comes up and down) and the Daleks (very ArtDeco, but with plungers) can only really be changed so much before they don't look like they're supposed to any more. It should also be noted that during the early Sixties, there was an obsession with hemispheres as being futuristic (similar to the modern-day HighTechHexagons aesthetic) which helps to explain the round things on the TARDIS walls and the weird little orbs on the Dalek armour, all of which would cause fan despair if it were removed. This aesthetic carried on showing up as late as the early 70s thanks to the show's NoBudget nature - the original Sonic Screwdriver as used by the Third Doctor was actually an unused prop from ''Series/{{Thunderbirds}}'' (which began in 1965) and hence looks [[FashionDissonance 60s as heck]]. While the new series modernised everything as much as possible - starting off during the Ninth Doctor's tenure with a semi-organic, {{Steampunk}} influenced TARDIS interior and weighty-looking, almost industrial Daleks - the sonic screwdrivers are still knowingly designed to follow this aesthetic, perhaps because in the Ninth Doctor's tenure it's revealed that the screwdriver is laughably low-quality, dated technology.

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'', especially in its earlier seasons (as they were made in the early 1960s). This particularly leads to ZeerustCanon, as the look of the inside of the TARDIS (particularly the a big hexagonal console with a glass column that comes moves up and down) and the Daleks (very ArtDeco, but with plungers) can only really be changed so much before they don't look like they're supposed to any more. It should also be noted that during the early Sixties, there was an obsession with hemispheres as being futuristic (similar to the modern-day HighTechHexagons aesthetic) which helps to explain the round things on the TARDIS walls and the weird little orbs on the Dalek armour, all of which would cause fan despair if it were removed. This aesthetic carried on showing up as late as the early 70s thanks to the show's NoBudget nature - the original Sonic Screwdriver as used by the Third Doctor was actually an unused prop from ''Series/{{Thunderbirds}}'' (which began in 1965) and hence looks [[FashionDissonance 60s as heck]]. While the new series modernised everything as much as possible - starting off during the Ninth Doctor's tenure with a semi-organic, {{Steampunk}} influenced TARDIS interior and weighty-looking, almost industrial Daleks - the sonic screwdrivers are still knowingly designed to follow this aesthetic, perhaps because in the Ninth Doctor's tenure it's revealed that the screwdriver is laughably low-quality, dated technology.


** Of course, a lot of the look of ''Futurama'' as a whole is partly inspired by Raygun Gothic itself, particulary some of the buildings, the technology and the lot of the Planet Express Ship.

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** Of course, a lot of the look of ''Futurama'' as a whole is partly inspired by Raygun Gothic itself, particulary particularly some of the buildings, the technology and the lot of the Planet Express Ship.


* {{Portal 2}} mod, [[Videogame/PortalStoriesMel Portal Stories: Mel]] has used this idea in the first part of the story taking place in an unnamed town created by Aperture Science's contraction workers.

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* {{Portal 2}} A ''Videogame/Portal2'' mod, [[Videogame/PortalStoriesMel ''[[Videogame/PortalStoriesMel Portal Stories: Mel]] Mel]]'' has used this idea in the first part of the story taking place in an unnamed town created by Aperture Science's contraction workers.

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