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** A more mundane example is how battles are conducted. The main Pokemon [=RPGs=] use TurnBasedCombat that wouldn't work well in a setting where Pokemon can move freely at any time. Other liberties are taken where elemental moves can cancel other moves and dodging is a legitimate option. As a result, Pokemon battles behave a bit more like a ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' then the main [=RPGs=].


*** The self-titled redo of ''WesternAnimation/TheDeathOfSuperman'' and ''WesternAnimation/ReignOfTheSupermen'' are TruerToTheText in many areas, including more than one battle against Doomsday; the Justice League being present for the battles with Doomsday; [[spoiler: the presence of ComicBook/{{Steel}}, ComicBook/{{Superboy}}, the Eradicator, and Cyborg-Superman, instead of a clone that's a fusion of the latter three]]--but in part because it's set in a universe original inspired by the ''ComicBook/New52'', a League with A-listers and a plainly himself Lex Luthor (whereas the original story was still during the ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueInternational'' days and Luthor was involved in a subplot where he transferred his brain into a clone body and pretended to be his own son).

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*** The self-titled redo of ''WesternAnimation/TheDeathOfSuperman'' and ''WesternAnimation/ReignOfTheSupermen'' are TruerToTheText in many areas, including more than one battle against Doomsday; the Justice League being present for the battles with Doomsday; and [[spoiler: the presence of ComicBook/{{Steel}}, ComicBook/{{Superboy}}, the Eradicator, and Cyborg-Superman, instead of a clone that's a fusion of the latter three]]--but in part because it's set in a universe original inspired by the ''ComicBook/New52'', a League with A-listers and a plainly himself Lex Luthor (whereas the original story was still during the ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueInternational'' days and Luthor was involved in a subplot where he transferred his brain into a clone body and pretended to be his own son).


*** The self-titled redo of ''WesternAnimation/TheDeathOfSuperman'' and ''WesternAnimation/ReignOfTheSupermen'' are CloserToTheText in many areas, including more than one battle against Doomsday; the Justice League being present for the battles with Doomsday; [[spoiler: the presence of ComicBook/{{Steel}}, ComicBook/{{Superboy}}, the Eradicator, and Cyborg-Superman, instead of a clone that's a fusion of the latter three]]; and, in part because it's set in a universe original inspired by the ''ComicBook/New52'', a League with A-listers and a plainly himself Lex Luthor (whereas the original story was still during the ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueIntentional'' days and Luthor was involved in a subplot where he transferred his brain into a clone body and pretended to be his own son).

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*** The self-titled redo of ''WesternAnimation/TheDeathOfSuperman'' and ''WesternAnimation/ReignOfTheSupermen'' are CloserToTheText TruerToTheText in many areas, including more than one battle against Doomsday; the Justice League being present for the battles with Doomsday; [[spoiler: the presence of ComicBook/{{Steel}}, ComicBook/{{Superboy}}, the Eradicator, and Cyborg-Superman, instead of a clone that's a fusion of the latter three]]; and, three]]--but in part because it's set in a universe original inspired by the ''ComicBook/New52'', a League with A-listers and a plainly himself Lex Luthor (whereas the original story was still during the ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueIntentional'' ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueInternational'' days and Luthor was involved in a subplot where he transferred his brain into a clone body and pretended to be his own son).


[[index]]
* PragmaticAdaptation/LiveActionTV
** ''PragmaticAdaptation/GameOfThrones''
[[/index]]

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[[index]]
* PragmaticAdaptation/LiveActionTV
** ''PragmaticAdaptation/GameOfThrones''
[[/index]]

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* ''PragmaticAdaptation/GameOfThrones''


* The first half of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanDoomsday'' runs ''ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman'' fairly straight, save for the absence of the Justice League, but the second half, based on ''The Reign of the Supermen'', gives us a single replacement Superman, who's a clone like Superboy, but [[CompositeCharacter with elements of both]] the Eradicator (crimefighter with [[WellIntentionedExtremist extreme zero-tolerance policy]]) and the Cyborg (a villain secretly working with another villain). This half also drops the complex Mongul plot entirely in favor of a straightforward battle of the Supermen. It also manages to squeeze in a little of ''Funeral For a Friend'', which took place in between the two halves. One effective choice was leaving out Pa Kent: this cut his heart attack subplot and intensified Martha's mourning by leaving her without both of them (it also ties in better with the Superman movie franchise, which contemporary audiences would be familiar with).
* ''WesternAnimation/GreenLanternFirstFlight'' breezes over Hal Jordan's classic origin story in about 5 minutes to focus on the intergalactic dealings of the Franchise/GreenLantern [[TheChosenMany Corps]]. This was partially because the LiveActionAdaptation of ''Green Lantern'' was planned to delve into said origin, but also because they examined much of the same story in ''[[ComicBook/DCTheNewFrontier Justice League: The New Frontier]]'', and they didn't want to rehash his origin with every new DTV. Ironically, it turned out to be much, much better received than the live-action film.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanUnderTheRedHood'' did this to its original story, "Under the Hood", as well as "ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily". Among the changes were: omitting everything from "Death" unrelated to Jason Todd's death, removing or altering things related to ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' to make it more standalone (including changing how Jason Todd was resurrected to the more-familiar Lazarus Pit), and replacing then-current Gotham City police commissioner Michael Akins with the more familiar James Gordon, who'd retired from the post and wouldn't return until after the aforementioned ''Infinite Crisis''.

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* WesternAnimation/DCUniverseAnimatedOriginalMovies:
** Both adaptations of ''ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman'':
***
The first half of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanDoomsday'' runs ''ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman'' fairly straight, save for the absence of the Justice League, but the second half, based on ''The Reign of the Supermen'', gives us a single replacement Superman, who's a clone like Superboy, but [[CompositeCharacter with elements of both]] the Eradicator (crimefighter with [[WellIntentionedExtremist extreme zero-tolerance policy]]) and the Cyborg (a villain secretly working with another villain). This half also drops the complex Mongul plot entirely in favor of a straightforward battle of the Supermen. It also manages to squeeze in a little of ''Funeral For a Friend'', which took place in between the two halves. One effective choice was leaving out Pa Kent: this cut his heart attack subplot and intensified Martha's mourning by leaving her without both of them (it also ties in better with the Superman movie franchise, which contemporary audiences would be familiar with).
* *** The self-titled redo of ''WesternAnimation/TheDeathOfSuperman'' and ''WesternAnimation/ReignOfTheSupermen'' are CloserToTheText in many areas, including more than one battle against Doomsday; the Justice League being present for the battles with Doomsday; [[spoiler: the presence of ComicBook/{{Steel}}, ComicBook/{{Superboy}}, the Eradicator, and Cyborg-Superman, instead of a clone that's a fusion of the latter three]]; and, in part because it's set in a universe original inspired by the ''ComicBook/New52'', a League with A-listers and a plainly himself Lex Luthor (whereas the original story was still during the ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueIntentional'' days and Luthor was involved in a subplot where he transferred his brain into a clone body and pretended to be his own son).
**
''WesternAnimation/GreenLanternFirstFlight'' breezes over Hal Jordan's classic origin story in about 5 minutes to focus on the intergalactic dealings of the Franchise/GreenLantern [[TheChosenMany Corps]]. This was partially because the LiveActionAdaptation of ''Green Lantern'' was planned to delve into said origin, but also because they examined much of the same story in ''[[ComicBook/DCTheNewFrontier Justice League: The New Frontier]]'', and they didn't want to rehash his origin with every new DTV. Ironically, it turned out to be much, much better received than the live-action film.
* ** ''WesternAnimation/BatmanUnderTheRedHood'' did this to its original story, "Under the Hood", as well as "ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily". Among the changes were: omitting everything from "Death" unrelated to Jason Todd's death, removing or altering things related to ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' to make it more standalone (including changing how Jason Todd was resurrected to the more-familiar Lazarus Pit), and replacing then-current Gotham City police commissioner Michael Akins with the more familiar James Gordon, who'd retired from the post and wouldn't return until after the aforementioned ''Infinite Crisis''.Crisis''.
** ''WesternAnimation/BatmanGothamByGaslight'' took some liberties to make its version of the UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper mystery work better than simply adapt the suspect of [[ComicBook/GothamByGaslight the original comic]]. Namely, [[AlternateHistory limiting Jack's crimes to Gotham]] and [[spoiler:while [[DemotedToExtra demoting Jack Packer, the book's Ripper, to a voiceless cameo]] and making [[AdaptationalVillainy Commissioner Gordon]] is the film's Ripper.]]



* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanGothamByGaslight'' took some liberties to make its version of the UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper mystery work better than simply adapt the suspect of [[ComicBook/GothamByGaslight the original comic]]. Namely, [[AlternateHistory limiting Jack's crimes to Gotham]] and [[spoiler:while [[DemotedToExtra demoting Jack Packer, the book's Ripper, to a voiceless cameo]] and making [[AdaptationalVillainy Commissioner Gordon]] is the film's Ripper.]]


* ''Film/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' [[ZigZaggingTrope grappled back and forth with this]] [[TroubledProduction due to several issues regarding E.L. James' unusual amount of creative control on what was allowed to be changed from her book]]. Some changes were inevitable, mostly toning down the explicit sexual content from the original book, completely doing away with Anastasia's infamously {{Narm}}tastic InnerMonologue, and both director Creator/SamTaylorJohnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel proposed many script changes to also potentially tone down or at least address the book's also-infamous UnfortunateImplications. Some minor changes able to make it through, but many of them were [[DefiedTrope outright vetoed]] [[ExecutiveVeto by E.L. James]].

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* ''Film/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' [[ZigZaggingTrope grappled back and forth with this]] [[TroubledProduction due to several issues regarding E.L. James' unusual amount of creative control on what was allowed to be changed from her book]]. Some changes were inevitable, mostly toning down the explicit sexual content from the original book, completely doing away with Anastasia's infamously {{Narm}}tastic InnerMonologue, and both director Creator/SamTaylorJohnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel proposed many script changes to also potentially tone down or at least address the book's also-infamous UnfortunateImplications. Some minor changes were able to make it through, but many of them were [[DefiedTrope outright vetoed]] [[ExecutiveVeto by E.L. James]].

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* ''Film/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' [[ZigZaggingTrope grappled back and forth with this]] [[TroubledProduction due to several issues regarding E.L. James' unusual amount of creative control on what was allowed to be changed from her book]]. Some changes were inevitable, mostly toning down the explicit sexual content from the original book, completely doing away with Anastasia's infamously {{Narm}}tastic InnerMonologue, and both director Creator/SamTaylorJohnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel proposed many script changes to also potentially tone down or at least address the book's also-infamous UnfortunateImplications. Some minor changes able to make it through, but many of them were [[DefiedTrope outright vetoed]] [[ExecutiveVeto by E.L. James]].

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* ''Fanfic/TheDarkLady'': In-canon, Belle's complex relationship with Rumpelstiltskin takes place after Snow White and Prince Charming succeed against Regina and Emma being born and raised in their kingdom. Regina has already been reformed and raised Emma's secret love-child Henry up until he is four-years old by the time Belle became pregnant with Gideon.
** Unlike in the series, the Curse of the Dark One cannot be broken by True Love's kiss.
** The Dark Realm here lacks the NarniaTime it had in-canon.


Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to. In that case, gameplay elements as well as story elements would have to be adjusted to accommodate the translation. If done poorly, this can lead to a PortingDisaster.

to:

Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to. In that case, gameplay elements as well as story elements would have to be adjusted to accommodate the translation. If done poorly, this can lead to a PortingDisaster.
PortingDisaster. If a story is mishandled in its adaptation to a video game, it can lead to TheProblemWithLicensedGames.


Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to. In that case, gameplay elements as well as story elements would have to be adjusted to accomodate the translation. If done poorly, this can lead to a PortingDisaster.

to:

Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to. In that case, gameplay elements as well as story elements would have to be adjusted to accomodate accommodate the translation. If done poorly, this can lead to a PortingDisaster.


Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to. If done poorly, this can lead to a PortingDisaster.

to:

Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to. In that case, gameplay elements as well as story elements would have to be adjusted to accomodate the translation. If done poorly, this can lead to a PortingDisaster.


Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to.

to:

Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to.
to. If done poorly, this can lead to a PortingDisaster.

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Video game adaptation can also fall into this, such as when one is adapting a PC game to a console game, or vice versa, due to any number of issues concerning the target machine that the game is being adapted to.


Time is often a factor in this. When you're adapting a 600-page book (or, for that matter, a [[Franchise/{{Batman}} seventy-year-old]] [[Franchise/{{Superman}} comic series]]) into a [[TheFilmOfTheBook two-hour movie]], something's gotta go. The reverse can also be true; stretching out a relatively short book into a much longer film and/or TV show often results in [[AdaptationExpansion changes]].

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Time is often a factor in this. When you're adapting a 600-page book (or, for that matter, a an [[Franchise/{{Batman}} seventy-year-old]] eighty-year-old]] [[Franchise/{{Superman}} comic series]]) into a [[TheFilmOfTheBook two-hour movie]], something's gotta go. The reverse can also be true; stretching out a relatively short book into a much longer film and/or TV show often results in [[AdaptationExpansion changes]].

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