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* [[WesternAnimation/YosemiteSam]] (this time as a pirate) is burying his chest full of booty in the ground on an island ("Buccaneer Bunny"), only Bugs has plundered it himself.

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* [[WesternAnimation/YosemiteSam]] WesternAnimation/YosemiteSam (this time as a pirate) is burying his chest full of booty in the ground on an island ("Buccaneer Bunny"), only Bugs has plundered it himself.

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* [[WesternAnimation/YosemiteSam]] (this time as a pirate) is burying his chest full of booty in the ground on an island ("Buccaneer Bunny"), only Bugs has plundered it himself.
* WesternAnimation/HeckleAndJeckle make off with a pirate's loot in "Pirate's Gold," only to have all but one coin glomped by [[TaxmanTakesTheWinnings a tax collector.]]


'''Captain:''' ''[shoots him, then looks at his other men, who furiously begin digging a hole]'' Ahhr! We'll dig up the treasure in seven yarr. I've drawn a map on this cracker, which Polly will hold for safe keepin'.

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'''Captain:''' ''[shoots him, then looks at his other men, who furiously begin digging a hole]'' Ahhr! We'll dig up the treasure in seven yarr. I've drawn a map [[TreasureMap map]] on this cracker, which Polly [[PirateParrot Polly]] will hold for safe keepin'.


* Only two pirates are known to have actually buried treasure. The first was Captain William Kidd, who buried a portion of his wealth on, of all places, Long Island, in an attempt to use it as a bargaining chip to avoid punishment for his piracy. It didn't work. (Hey, Long Island is a very nice place to live!).

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* Only two pirates are known to have actually buried treasure. The first was Captain William Kidd, who buried a portion of his wealth on, of all places, Long Island, New York, in an attempt to use it as a bargaining chip to avoid punishment for his piracy. It didn't work. (Hey, work (hey, Long Island is a very nice place to live!). live).
** William Kidd also allegedly buried a portion of his treasure on Gallops Island, Boston, as well as Henry Avery who allegedly buried diamonds on the island.

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* In ''Film/CaptainBlood'', Capt. Peter Blood shows Arabella all of his Pirate Booty in an effort to impress her. It fails.


* On the rare occasions where a pirate ''did'' manage to get their hands on massive piles of gold and silver, they generally wound up becoming quite famous. For example, [[UsefulNotes/SirFrancisDrake Francis Drake]] earned a knighthood and status as one of the founding heroes of the British Empire, largely by stealing Spanish treasure. Tons of it. Of course, he didn't bury it; he took it back to England. Where, predictably, most of his crew spent their shares of the treasure on drinking and whoring, also known as "the fun way" of putting said treasure into your sponsor nation's economy.

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* On the rare occasions where a pirate ''did'' manage to get their hands on massive piles of gold and silver, they generally wound up becoming quite famous. For example, [[UsefulNotes/SirFrancisDrake Francis Drake]] earned a knighthood and status as one of the founding heroes of the British Empire, largely by stealing Spanish treasure. Tons of it. Of course, he didn't bury it; it (or at least, not most of it, see below); he took it back to England. Where, predictably, most of his crew spent their shares of the treasure on drinking and whoring, also known as "the fun way" of putting said treasure into your sponsor nation's economy.

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** The [[FillerArc Filler Arcs]] (and [[NonSerialMovie TV specials and movies]]) will usually be a lot more focused on traditionally buried loot, though it's [[StatusQuoIsGod almost a cert]] [[PerpetualPoverty the Straw Hats won't be able to keep it]] by the time the end credits roll.


* The only pirate known to have actually buried his treasure was Captain William Kidd, who buried a portion of his wealth on, of all places, Long Island, in an attempt to use it as a bargaining chip to avoid punishment for his piracy. It didn't work. (Hey, Long Island is a very nice place to live!)
* On the rare occasions where a pirate ''did'' manage to get their hands on massive piles of gold and silver, they generally wound up becoming quite famous. For example, [[UsefulNotes/SirFrancisDrake Francis Drake]] earned a knighthood and status as one of the founding heroes of the British Empire, largely by stealing Spanish treasure. Tons of it. Of course, he didn't bury it; he took it back to England. Where, predictably, most of his crew spent their shares of the treasure on drinking and whoring, also known as "the fun way" of putting said treasure into your sponsor nation's economy.

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* The only pirate Only two pirates are known to have actually buried his treasure treasure. The first was Captain William Kidd, who buried a portion of his wealth on, of all places, Long Island, in an attempt to use it as a bargaining chip to avoid punishment for his piracy. It didn't work. (Hey, Long Island is a very nice place to live!)
live!).
* On the rare occasions where a pirate ''did'' manage to get their hands on massive piles of gold and silver, they generally wound up becoming quite famous. For example, [[UsefulNotes/SirFrancisDrake Francis Drake]] earned a knighthood and status as one of the founding heroes of the British Empire, largely by stealing Spanish treasure. Tons of it. Of course, he didn't bury it; he took it back to England. Where, predictably, most of his crew spent their shares of the treasure on drinking and whoring, also known as "the fun way" of putting said treasure into your sponsor nation's economy.
** Drake was the second of the two known pirates to have buried treasure - he stole ''so much'' treasure from the Spanish that he couldn't take it all in one trip, so he took the gold and hid the silver. Of course, since the spot where he buried the silver was only a few hundred yards away from the spot where he stole it in the first place (not wanting to haul a lot of very heavy treasure any further than he absolutely had to), the Spanish were able to find and recover it fairly quickly.


* Justified in ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl'', as the pirates are waiting to spend the treasure until they are uncursed. Heck, averting this trope is the very reason they have a problem to begin with, because they spent all of the treasure immediately after finding it, and thus have to go around recollecting all of the coins that comprised it to lift the curse.

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* Played with in the ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' series:
**
Justified in ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl'', as the pirates are waiting to spend the treasure until they are uncursed. Heck, averting this trope is the very reason they have a problem to begin with, because they spent all of the treasure immediately after finding it, and thus have to go around recollecting all of the coins that comprised it to lift the curse.curse.
** Justified in ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'': the "treasure" buried for safekeeping is the source of Davy Jones' immortality, and while extremely valuable, isn't something that can be spent.


[[IThoughtItMeant Has nothing to do with]] ''that'' kind of [[PirateGirl "Pirate Booty"]].

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[[IThoughtItMeant [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant Has nothing to do with]] ''that'' kind of [[PirateGirl "Pirate Booty"]].


The reality of piracy was a lot more pragmatic. Food, fresh water, weapons and ammunition, timber, ropes, and sails were all of more immediate value to the corsair than a chest full of gold (which, if they ever got any, would promptly be ''spent'' on food, fresh water, weapons and ammunition, timber, ropes, and sails, with what was left going to drinking and whoring before they got caught and hanged). These things kept their ships and crews operating outside the reach of the law. In addition, very few cargo vessels carried that kind of wealth. Those that did were warships sailing in groups with enhanced security to fend off any pirates that might attempt an attack. (Certain, more mundane-looking cargoes, mind, might be more valuable than we would think of today--alcohol, fabrics, spices, and various "exotic" items from extremely far afield)

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The reality of piracy was a lot more pragmatic. Food, fresh water, weapons and ammunition, timber, ropes, and sails were all of more immediate value to the corsair than a chest full of gold (which, if they ever got any, would promptly be ''spent'' on food, fresh water, weapons and ammunition, timber, ropes, and sails, with what was left going to drinking and whoring before they got caught and hanged). These things kept their ships and crews operating outside the reach of the law. In addition, very few cargo vessels carried that kind of wealth. Those that did were warships sailing in groups with enhanced security to fend off any pirates that might attempt an attack. (Certain, more mundane-looking cargoes, mind, might be more valuable than we would think of today--alcohol, fabrics, spices, and various "exotic" items from extremely far afield)
afield) Furthermore it was much easier to fence cargo goods than gold and jewels, and even if a pirate found such treasures they might not even understand the value of the items. In one famous case a pirate smashed a large diamond with a hammer because a crew mate got numerous smaller diamonds as his share. Feeling cheated he smashed the diamond into numerous smaller pieces.


* Justified in the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode ''The Curse of the Black Spot'' -- the pirate in question was [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Every Henry Every]], one of the very few pirates to actually get his hands on a cargo of gold and jewels (and the episode even specified that it was the Mughal's treasure).

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* Justified in the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode ''The "The Curse of the Black Spot'' Spot" -- the pirate in question was [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Every Henry Every]], one of the very few pirates to actually get his hands on a cargo of gold and jewels (and the episode even specified that it was the Mughal's treasure).



* ''TheGlades'' episode "Booty" centres around the search for lost pirate treasure, and the murder of one of the treasure hunters. Jim and Callie dig up the treasure just before being confronted by the murderer.

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* ''TheGlades'' ''Series/TheGlades'' episode "Booty" centres around the search for lost pirate treasure, and the murder of one of the treasure hunters. Jim and Callie dig up the treasure just before being confronted by the murderer.


* ''VideoGame/Uncharted4AThiefsEnd'' has Nate chasing after a pirate (Henry Avery) treasure he and his brother once tried to claim until fate intervened fifteen years before the start of the game.

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* ''VideoGame/Uncharted4AThiefsEnd'' has Nate chasing after a pirate (Henry Avery) the legendary treasure of Henry Avery, which he and his brother once tried had been dreaming about since childhood. [[spoiler: They eventually discover that a large part of it was used to claim until fate intervened fifteen years before the start fund Libertalia, a colony for pirates that eventually self destructed. The remains of the game.treasure is found in Avery's explosive-ladden ship]]


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* One of the most famous pirate treasure hauls came from a massive convoy belonging to the Grand Mughal Empire, who were on the annual pilgrimage to Mecca. The envoy was attacked by a pirate fleet led by the infamous Captain Henry Avery and Thomas Tew, who made off with about 52 Million £ in modern money, though Tew was killed in the battle. Notably, Avery and his men committed horrible crimes against the passengers, far worse than what most pirates would normally do, to the point that the attack damaged Britains relations with the Mughal Empire, and led to Avery becoming the target of the first international manhunt. Avery disappears from history afterwards, but about 25 or so of his men were tracked down and publically hanged. No one knows for sure what happened to the treasure.

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* A scenario in a tavern where someone sells you a map leading to a treasure the seller knows about but "can't" recover, similar to Alestorm's ''Over The Seas'' and ''Nancy's Harbour Cafe'', is discussed repeatedly in ''TabletopGames/{{Fifty Fathoms}}''. These could be completely made-up maps of nonsense geography, lead to islands which no longer exist, or to traps, or simply nothing. Often the best you might find is a chest, empty but for a note saying the 17th-century equivalent of "haha FU u n00b, ive run off with yer money".


* Subverted plenty of times in the ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series. In ''VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland'' the treasure of Melee island turned out to be a t-shirt that said that you found it, and in ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland2LeChucksRevenge'' the McGuffin the Big Whoop turned out to be a worthless ticket for an amusement park, [[spoiler:though actually, it was later revealed that the Big Whoop was the entrance to hell, where [=LeChuck=] became an immortal Ghost/Zombie/Demon]]. The trope image is [=LeChuck's=] personal horde from ''VideoGame/TheCurseOfMonkeyIsland''; later on whenever Guybrush successfully raids a pirate ship (to get the money he needs to upgrade his cannons) he'll proudly declare "We're loaded with booty.".

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* Subverted plenty of times in the ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series. In ''VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland'' the treasure of Melee island turned out to be a t-shirt that said that you found it, and in ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland2LeChucksRevenge'' the McGuffin the Big Whoop turned out to be a worthless ticket for an amusement park, [[spoiler:though actually, it was later revealed that the Big Whoop was the entrance to hell, where [=LeChuck=] became an immortal Ghost/Zombie/Demon]]. The trope image is [=LeChuck's=] personal horde from ''VideoGame/TheCurseOfMonkeyIsland''; later on whenever Guybrush successfully raids a pirate ship (to get the money he needs to upgrade his cannons) he'll proudly declare "We're loaded with booty."."

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