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* Most VideoGame/MarioKart games from ''Mario Kart 64'' and onward have at least one racetrack in the form of a public road, with regular motor traffic still traveling through it. The racers, of course, can weave through traffic, collide with them, ignore lane divisions, drive on the wrong side of the road, ignore traffic lights and tollbooths, and attack the non-racing vehicles and not get in any trouble. The Extra version of Toad's Turnpike in ''Mario Kart 64'' takes it further by having the entire race set in the opposite direction of traffic. Moonview Highway from ''Mario Kart Wii'', actually encourages sheer chaos on the roads, as a few vehicles are gigantic bombs that explode if a racer or item touches them in any way.
* Played straight in ''VideoGame/SonicRiders'' with Metal City, which, like the Mario Kart examples, are public roads still in general use as the racers are traveling by. Subverted slightly in Night Chase, however, as police cars are everywhere and will go after the racers, but they're not very effective. Boosting will knock the police cars out of the way though.

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* Most VideoGame/MarioKart games from ''Mario Kart 64'' and onward have at least one racetrack in the form of a public road, with regular motor traffic still traveling through it. The racers, of course, can weave through traffic, collide with them, ignore lane divisions, drive on the wrong side of the road, ignore traffic lights and tollbooths, and attack the non-racing vehicles and not get in any trouble. The Extra version of Toad's Turnpike in ''Mario Kart 64'' takes it further by having the entire race set in the opposite direction of traffic. Moonview Highway from ''Mario Kart Wii'', actually encourages sheer chaos on the roads, as a few vehicles are gigantic bombs (which themselves are barely following traffic rules) that explode if a racer or item touches them in any way.
* Played straight in ''VideoGame/SonicRiders'' with Metal City, which, like the Mario Kart examples, are public roads still in general use as the racers are traveling by. Subverted slightly in Night Chase, however, as police cars are everywhere and will go are going after the racers, but they're not very effective. Boosting will knock someone, though it's unclear whom. Power characters can punch the police cars out of the way though.



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* Most VideoGame/MarioKart games from ''Mario Kart 64'' and onward have at least one racetrack in the form of a public road, with regular motor traffic still traveling through it. The racers, of course, can weave through traffic, collide with them, ignore lane divisions, drive on the wrong side of the road, ignore traffic lights and tollbooths, and attack the non-racing vehicles and not get in any trouble. The Extra version of Toad's Turnpike in ''Mario Kart 64'' takes it further by having the entire race set in the opposite direction of traffic. Moonview Highway from ''Mario Kart Wii'', actually encourages sheer chaos on the roads, as a few vehicles are gigantic bombs that explode if a racer or item touches them in any way.
* Played straight in ''VideoGame/SonicRiders'' with Metal City, which, like the Mario Kart examples, are public roads still in general use as the racers are traveling by. Subverted slightly in Night Chase, however, as police cars are everywhere and will go after the racers, but they're not very effective. Boosting will knock the police cars out of the way though.


* An interesting example occurs in one of the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games (''Hot Pursuit'', IIRC) some/most of the tracks have signs with the speed limit on them. If you stay under this limit, the police will leave you alone. Granted it takes about twice as long to finish the race, but still.

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* An interesting example occurs in one some of the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games (''Hot Pursuit'', IIRC) some/most of the tracks have signs with the speed limit on them. If you stay under this limit, the police will leave you alone. Granted it takes about twice as long to finish the race, but still.


* The later games in the ''Franchise/JakAndDaxter'' series are an exception, although in this case, it's only if you hit one of the Krimson Guard. You can run over all the civilians you want with no penalties in Haven City. In Spargus, everyone is armed, and will fire if you hit them.

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* The later games in the ''Franchise/JakAndDaxter'' ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'' series are an exception, although in this case, it's only if you hit one of the Krimson Guard. You can run over all the civilians you want with no penalties in Haven City. In Spargus, everyone is armed, and will fire if you hit them.



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* In ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'', the standard penalty for doing anything wrong is to be blown up, either by allowing the aggrieved party to shoot you or for particularly bad violations having the space police show up and shoot you. However, for once [[RammingAlwaysWorks ramming ''doesn't'' always work]] and in fact causes no damage at all, meaning it doesn't count as an offence. But collisions do have physics, and ships need to take time to perfectly align themselves before entering warp speed. Since large ships tend to turn slowly, it's possible to repeatedly ram them and prevent them from ever warping away, while also knocking them too far from a station to dock. This is frequently used against targets in war or other legitimate targets, by having neutral parties prevent them escaping while giving them no way to fight back since the neutrals haven't actually done anything wrong.



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* Justified in ''VideoGame/{{Mercenaries}} 1 & 2''. You're a heavily armed mercenary in a war-zone, there's nobody enforcing traffic laws at the moment, and even if there were they wouldn't want to mess with someone who's packing enough firepower to flatten a city block.


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* Another exception: Part of the challenge of the original ''{{Driver}}'' and it's sequel was that you had to obey things like speed limits or traffic lights when the police were around. You would actually fail certain missions for as much as ''neglecting to signal a turn''. Better hope you don't hit your car at night, too - Missing headlight = Immediate police reprisal. In the original, police cruisers will ram and sideswipe your vehicle into scrap for the smallest breach of the traffic laws. Ironically, it's actually impossible to run over any pedestrians in the game, due to their ability to jump and duck away JustInTime (if due to a game glitch, they jump in the wrong direction, they'll just go through your car).

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* Another exception: Part of the challenge of the original ''{{Driver}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Driver}}'' and it's sequel was that you had to obey things like speed limits or traffic lights when the police were around. You would actually fail certain missions for as much as ''neglecting to signal a turn''. Better hope you don't hit your car at night, too - Missing headlight = Immediate police reprisal. In the original, police cruisers will ram and sideswipe your vehicle into scrap for the smallest breach of the traffic laws. Ironically, it's actually impossible to run over any pedestrians in the game, due to their ability to jump and duck away JustInTime (if due to a game glitch, they jump in the wrong direction, they'll just go through your car).


* In the ''[[SamAndMaxHitTheRoad Sam And Max Freelance Police]]'' episodic games, the main characters ''are'' the police (well, police with no official authorization or oversight on any level), and one of them is additionally [[spoiler: the President of the United States]], so there's no penalty for destroying traffic cones, stoplights, lampposts, or sidewalk cafes during the driving sequences. There's no benefit, either - it's just ''fun''.

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* In the ''[[SamAndMaxHitTheRoad ''[[VideoGame/SamAndMaxHitTheRoad Sam And Max Freelance Police]]'' episodic games, the main characters ''are'' the police (well, police with no official authorization or oversight on any level), and one of them is additionally [[spoiler: the President of the United States]], so there's no penalty for destroying traffic cones, stoplights, lampposts, or sidewalk cafes during the driving sequences. There's no benefit, either - it's just ''fun''.


* And while we're throwing around exceptions, ''[[MidnightClub Midnight Club Los Angeles]]'' sends cops after you if one spots you exceeding the speed limit, running a red light or otherwise driving irresponsibly. (Thankfully, this is only the case if there's a cop within a short radius of you.)

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* And while we're throwing around exceptions, ''[[MidnightClub ''[[VideoGame/MidnightClub Midnight Club Los Angeles]]'' sends cops after you if one spots you exceeding the speed limit, running a red light or otherwise driving irresponsibly. (Thankfully, this is only the case if there's a cop within a short radius of you.)


* The ''SaintsRow'' games. In 2, you even get bonus points for driving on the wrong side of the road or just barely missing a car, similar to ''Burnout''.

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* The ''SaintsRow'' ''VideoGame/SaintsRow'' games. In 2, you even get bonus points for driving on the wrong side of the road or just barely missing a car, similar to ''Burnout''.


* ''A.P.B.'' from {{Atari}} Games works similarly, although bad enough wrecks will get you demerits. Then again, you're the cop in this one.

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* ''A.P.B.'' from {{Atari}} Creator/{{Atari}} Games works similarly, although bad enough wrecks will get you demerits. Then again, you're the cop in this one.


** In the original remake for the PS2, there are all kinds of civilian cars around, and killing any of them, even by accident, usually [=SNAFUs=] your mission (later missions let you get away with killing some with the ambiguous parameter of "minimize civilian casualties"). That doesn't mean you can't smash through them all you want, just that you can't clear the mission if you do.

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** In the original remake for the PS2, [=PS2=], there are all kinds of civilian cars around, and killing any of them, even by accident, usually [=SNAFUs=] your mission (later missions let you get away with killing some with the ambiguous parameter of "minimize civilian casualties"). That doesn't mean you can't smash through them all you want, just that you can't clear the mission if you do.


* ''CrazyTaxi''.

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* ''CrazyTaxi''.''VideoGame/CrazyTaxi''.



* ''TheSimpsonsHitAndRun''. However, if you run too many people or things over the cops will come and chase you, although driving on the wrong side of the road and not stopping at traffic lights are not a problem.

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* ''TheSimpsonsHitAndRun''.''VideoGame/TheSimpsonsHitAndRun''. However, if you run too many people or things over the cops will come and chase you, although driving on the wrong side of the road and not stopping at traffic lights are not a problem.



** ''DriverSanFrancisco'' is much looser about this, though. It's justified two different ways: Tanner's an on-duty cop participating in authorized chases (and therefore expected to speed, weave through traffic, ect.) or other cars are getting away with shenanigans in Tanner's coma dream, where he subconsciously makes the rules[[note]]That might look like a spoiler, but it's not. The player knows this from the start, [[DramaticIrony even if Tanner doesn't.]][[/note]].

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** ''DriverSanFrancisco'' ''VideoGame/DriverSanFrancisco'' is much looser about this, though. It's justified two different ways: Tanner's an on-duty cop participating in authorized chases (and therefore expected to speed, weave through traffic, ect.) or other cars are getting away with shenanigans in Tanner's coma dream, where he subconsciously makes the rules[[note]]That might look like a spoiler, but it's not. The player knows this from the start, [[DramaticIrony even if Tanner doesn't.]][[/note]].



* ''{{Burnout}}'' and its sequels. These even include a mode where the intent is to crash as many cars as you can.
* ''SpyHunter''. Seriously. All these cars with blades, guns, missiles... and no-one around?

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* ''{{Burnout}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Burnout}}'' and its sequels. These even include a mode where the intent is to crash as many cars as you can.
* ''SpyHunter''.''VideoGame/SpyHunter''. Seriously. All these cars with blades, guns, missiles... and no-one around?



* In the original ''Road Rage'', police will come after you even if you do follow all the traffic laws.

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* In the original ''Road Rage'', ''VideoGame/RoadRash'', police will come after you even if you do follow all the traffic laws.



* Averted in ''SteambotChronicles'' where to be certain you don't break any laws, all control of your vehicle/robot is taken away from you while in a town. Usually it's faster to get out and walk than to wait for traffic queues at lights.
** And if you decide to go down the "[[VillainProtagonist evil]]" story branch... [[EvenEvilHasStandards you still follow traffic laws to the letter]].

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* Averted in ''SteambotChronicles'' ''VideoGame/SteambotChronicles'' where to be certain you don't break any laws, all control of your vehicle/robot is taken away from you while in a town. Usually it's faster to get out and walk than to wait for traffic queues at lights.
**
lights. And if you decide to go down the "[[VillainProtagonist evil]]" story branch... [[EvenEvilHasStandards you still follow traffic laws to the letter]].



* Exception: In ''{{Mafia}}'', police actually ''do'' come after you for the most minor infractions. One could toggle a speed limiter to keep velocity within the legal limit.

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* Exception: In ''{{Mafia}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Mafia}}'', police actually ''do'' come after you for the most minor infractions. One could toggle a speed limiter to keep velocity within the legal limit.



* Both ''{{Mercenaries}}''-games. Justified since they both take place in warzones.

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* Both ''{{Mercenaries}}''-games.''VideoGame/{{Mercenaries}}''-games. Justified since they both take place in warzones.



* ''RedFaction: Guerrilla''. You think the EDF would care about civilians driving like madmen, given heavy vehicles that can plow through buildings, but... nope. As long as you don't flatten any goons they don't give a damn. The AI civilians only care if you're in a tank or walker... at which point they panic and scatter, driving around like mad and sometimes making it ''harder'' to drive to your destination without killing any of them.
* ''LANoire'' justifies this: you're a cop and thus not beholden to traffic laws broken in the line of duty. [[TruthInTelevision This appears to be true in real life]]. Of course, if you commandeer a non-cop car, the police seem to magically be aware that Detective Phelps is behind the wheel and don't pursue him.

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* ''RedFaction: ''VideoGame/RedFaction: Guerrilla''. You think the EDF would care about civilians driving like madmen, given heavy vehicles that can plow through buildings, but... nope. As long as you don't flatten any goons they don't give a damn. The AI civilians only care if you're in a tank or walker... at which point they panic and scatter, driving around like mad and sometimes making it ''harder'' to drive to your destination without killing any of them.
* ''LANoire'' ''VideoGame/LANoire'' justifies this: you're a cop and thus not beholden to traffic laws broken in the line of duty. [[TruthInTelevision This appears to be true in real life]]. Of course, if you commandeer a non-cop car, the police seem to magically be aware that Detective Phelps is behind the wheel and don't pursue him.


* ''PoliceQuest'', a game focused on realistic portrayal of procedure, made you obey traffic laws, though later games in the series streamline things (IE no speed limits, no stops except at turns) to make things easier for the players.

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* ''PoliceQuest'', ''VideoGame/PoliceQuest'', a game focused on realistic portrayal of procedure, made you obey traffic laws, though later games in the series streamline things (IE no speed limits, no stops except at turns) to make things easier for the players.

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