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* ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'': In a very arcane (and BlinkAndYouMissIt) GeniusBonus, Dr. Judith Mossman quips about the resistance's superior, if somewhat [[FlawedPrototype unstable and homebrew]], [[TeleportersAndTransporters teleporter technology]]:

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* ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'': In a very arcane (and BlinkAndYouMissIt) [[FreezeFrameBonus Blink And You Miss It]]) GeniusBonus, Dr. Judith Mossman quips about the resistance's superior, if somewhat [[FlawedPrototype unstable and homebrew]], [[TeleportersAndTransporters teleporter technology]]:


--> "If the Combine only knew what we were doing with the Calabi�Yau model..."

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--> "If the Combine only knew what we were doing with the Calabi�Yau Calabi-Yau model..."

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* ''Radio/JourneyIntoSpace'': In ''Journey to the Moon'' / ''Operation Luna'', the Time Traveller states that, unlike humans, his people can control their movement through the fourth dimension: time.
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* The goddesses and other heavenly beings in [[AhMyGoddess]] are 10-dimensional entities (in the "string theory" sense), not that it comes up very often. This means that, ostensibly, [[FridgeLogic Keiichi can only perceive and interact with three dimensions of his ten-dimensional love interest.]]

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* The goddesses and other heavenly beings in [[AhMyGoddess]] ''Anime/AhMyGoddess'' are 10-dimensional entities (in the "string theory" sense), not that it comes up very often. This means that, ostensibly, [[FridgeLogic Keiichi can only perceive and interact with three dimensions of his ten-dimensional love interest.]]

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* The goddesses and other heavenly beings in [[AhMyGoddess]] are 10-dimensional entities (in the "string theory" sense), not that it comes up very often. This means that, ostensibly, [[FridgeLogic Keiichi can only perceive and interact with three dimensions of his ten-dimensional love interest.]]


* DiscussedTrope in the satirical novel ''Literature/{{Flatland}}''. A. Square is a regular guy who happens to be a square, living in a two-dimensional universe. He is visited by a sphere who preaches to him the Gospel of Three Dimensions. The square is scornful of the idea initially, but eventually the sphere convinces him. When the square talks excitedly of the possibility of a ''fourth'' dimension, the sphere [[NotSoDifferent immediately dismisses the idea as ridiculous]].

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* DiscussedTrope Discussed in the satirical novel ''Literature/{{Flatland}}''. A. Square is a regular guy who happens to be a square, living in a two-dimensional universe. He is visited by a sphere who preaches to him the Gospel of Three Dimensions. The square is scornful of the idea initially, but eventually the sphere convinces him. When the square talks excitedly of the possibility of a ''fourth'' dimension, the sphere [[NotSoDifferent immediately dismisses the idea as ridiculous]].



* Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy thoroughly [[JustifiedTrope Justifies]] this by ''rewriting the laws of physics'' to create an internally-consistent universe where there really ''are'' four spatial dimensions, one of which is perceived by the protagonists as time. An (oversimplified) explanation for why time seems so different from space is that the protagonist's momentum through the dimension of time is so great that it's impossible to change trajectory without technological assistance.

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* Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy thoroughly [[JustifiedTrope Justifies]] this by ''rewriting [[http://www.gregegan.net/ORTHOGONAL/ORTHOGONAL.html#CONTENTS rewrites the laws of physics'' physics]] to create an internally-consistent universe where there really ''are'' four spatial dimensions, one of which is perceived by the protagonists as time. An (oversimplified) explanation for why time seems so different from space is that the protagonist's momentum through the dimension of time is so great that it's impossible to change trajectory without technological assistance.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' parodies this trope in "Treehouse of Horror VI", where Homer ends up in a seeming EldritchLocation... one that renders everything, including himself, in ConspicuousCG. When people try to rescue Homer and figure out what happened to him, Dr. Frink explains that Homer is trapped in "the third dimension", something baffling to the people of the two-dimensional Springfield.

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** And in Spaceland, Creator/RudyRucker's homage to ''Flatland''


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* Discussed briefly in the first episode of ''Series/DoctorWho'', "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild An Unearthly Child,]]" demonstrating how strange Susan Foreman is. Worth noting that she's supposedly a [[AdorablyPrecociousChild 15-year-old girl]] at this point.
-->'''Susan:''' ''(About a math problem)'' It's impossible unless you use D and E.\\

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* Tesseracts are featured heavily as a plot device in ''Series/{{Andromeda}}'' . Specifically as tools of the Abyss and also used to help Harper.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
Discussed briefly in the very first episode of ''Series/DoctorWho'', "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild An episode, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild "An Unearthly Child,]]" Child"]], demonstrating how strange Susan Foreman is. Worth noting that she's supposedly a [[AdorablyPrecociousChild 15-year-old girl]] at this point.
-->'''Susan:''' ''(About ''[about a math problem)'' problem]'' It's impossible unless you use D and E.\\



* In ''Series/EarthFinalConflict'', Ma'el leaves behind a complex problem that has 10 components, one in each dimension. Thus, solving the entire problem requires thinking in 10 dimensions, and there's only one human in the world, who can do that. Even the Taelons aren't that smart.
* This is how Ford Prefect explains parallel universes to Arthur Dent in ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' segments of the Creator/DouglasAdams episode of ''The South Bank Show'' (tying into ''Mostly Harmless'' above), describing the five dimensions of height, length, width, time, and quantum uncertainty:
-->'''Ford''': Normally, human beings see landscapes of space, successive slices of time, and only one of slice quantum uncertainty. Rhinoceroses see landscapes of time[[note]]As explained elsewhere in the programme, and in ''Last Chance to See'', because smell is more important to rhinos than than sight, and odours fade away more gradually than photons do[[/note]]. Cats, I believe, see landscapes of quantum uncertainty.



* An episode of ''Series/StrangeDaysAtBlakeHolseyHigh'' featured a tesseract.



* In ''Series/EarthFinalConflict'', Ma'el leaves behind a complex problem that has 10 components, one in each dimension. Thus, solving the entire problem requires thinking in 10 dimensions, and there's only one human in the world, who can do that. Even the Taelons aren't that smart.
* Tesseracts are featured heavily as a plot device in ''Series/{{Andromeda}}'' . Specifically as tools of the Abyss and also used to help Harper.
* An episode of ''Series/StrangeDaysAtBlakeHolseyHigh'' featured a tesseract.
* This is how Ford Prefect explains parallel universes to Arthur Dent in ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' segments of the Creator/DouglasAdams episode of ''The South Bank Show'' (tying into ''Mostly Harmless'' above), describing the five dimensions of height, length, width, time, and quantum uncertainty:
-->'''Ford''': Normally, human beings see landscapes of space, successive slices of time, and only one of slice quantum uncertainty. Rhinoceroses see landscapes of time[[note]]As explained elsewhere in the programme, and in ''Last Chance to See'', because smell is more important to rhinos than than sight, and odours fade away more gradually than photons do[[/note]]. Cats, I believe, see landscapes of quantum uncertainty.



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-->'''Ford''': Normally, human beings see landscapes of space, successive slices of time, and only one of slice quantum uncertainty. Rhinoceroses see landscapes of time[[note]]As explained elsewhere in the programme, and in ''Last Chance to See'', because smell is more to rhinos than important than sight, and odours fade away more gradually than photons do[[/note]]. Cats, I believe, see landscapes of quantum uncertainty.

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-->'''Ford''': Normally, human beings see landscapes of space, successive slices of time, and only one of slice quantum uncertainty. Rhinoceroses see landscapes of time[[note]]As explained elsewhere in the programme, and in ''Last Chance to See'', because smell is more important to rhinos than important than sight, and odours fade away more gradually than photons do[[/note]]. Cats, I believe, see landscapes of quantum uncertainty.


* This is how Ford Prefect explains parallel universes to Arthur Dent in ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' segments of the Creator/DouglasAdams episode of ''The South Bank Show'' (tying into ''Mostly Harmless'' above):

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* This is how Ford Prefect explains parallel universes to Arthur Dent in ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' segments of the Creator/DouglasAdams episode of ''The South Bank Show'' (tying into ''Mostly Harmless'' above):above), describing the five dimensions of height, length, width, time, and quantum uncertainty:


* This is how Ford Prefect explains parallel universes to Arthur Dent in the ''Franchise/HitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' segments of the Creator/DouglasAdams episode of ''The South Bank Show'' (tying into ''Mostly Harmless'' above):

to:

* This is how Ford Prefect explains parallel universes to Arthur Dent in the ''Franchise/HitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' segments of the Creator/DouglasAdams episode of ''The South Bank Show'' (tying into ''Mostly Harmless'' above):



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* According to ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'', the Whole Sort of General Mish-Mash is the sum total of everything that could exist and all the different ways one could look at it. So-called parallel universes (which are neither) are "slices" through the Whole Sort of General Mish-Mash in various dimensions -- and since they're not parallel, these slices intersect.




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* This is how Ford Prefect explains parallel universes to Arthur Dent in the ''Franchise/HitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' segments of the Creator/DouglasAdams episode of ''The South Bank Show'' (tying into ''Mostly Harmless'' above):
-->'''Ford''': Normally, human beings see landscapes of space, successive slices of time, and only one of slice quantum uncertainty. Rhinoceroses see landscapes of time[[note]]As explained elsewhere in the programme, and in ''Last Chance to See'', because smell is more to rhinos than important than sight, and odours fade away more gradually than photons do[[/note]]. Cats, I believe, see landscapes of quantum uncertainty.


* A tesseract is a classic example. It's a cube with four spatial dimensions. The name even means "four rays" because at the corners of the tesseract there would be four lines all at right angles to each other [[SchmuckBait try and visualize that.]]

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* A tesseract is a classic example. It's a cube with four spatial dimensions. The name even means "four rays" because at the corners of the tesseract there would be four lines all at right angles to each other other. [[SchmuckBait try and visualize that.]]



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* A tesseract is a classic example. It's a cube with four spatial dimensions. The name even means "four rays" because at the corners of the tesseract there would be four lines all at right angles to each other [[SchmuckBait try and visualize that.]]

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