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* ''VideoGame/YokusIslandExpress'' is a pinball Metroidvania set on a large island, with interconnected areas, several quests and collectables, {{Boss Battle}}s, and the need to obtain new abilities in order to progress. Uniquely, there is no PinballScoring or lives, and it is impossible to receive a GameOver of any kind.

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* ''VideoGame/FerazelsWand'' is a Metroidvania for Mac OS.


* ''VideoGame/{{Headlander}}: Made by ''Creator/DoubleFine'', a rather unique take on the genre as progress isn't as much locked behind skills or abilities that you unlock, but rather the robot bodies you take control of, with higher level robots giving you access to more areas.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Headlander}}: ''VideoGame/{{Headlander}}'': Made by ''Creator/DoubleFine'', a rather unique take on the genre as progress isn't as much locked behind skills or abilities that you unlock, but rather the robot bodies you take control of, with higher level robots giving you access to more areas.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Headlander}}: Made by ''Creator/DoubleFine'', a rather unique take on the genre as progress isn't as much locked behind skills or abilities that you unlock, but rather the robot bodies you take control of, with higher level robots giving you access to more areas.


Games in this genre tend to be a four (or three) on the SlidingScaleOfLinearityVsOpenness. Competing terms include "Castletroid", "Castleroid", "Metrovania", "IGAvania", and "non-linear action adventure platformer", with or without capitalization.

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Games in this genre tend to be a four (or three) on the SlidingScaleOfLinearityVsOpenness. Competing terms include "Castletroid", "Castleroid", "Metrovania", "IGAvania", "[=IGAvania=]", and "non-linear action adventure platformer", with or without capitalization.


Games in this genre tend to be a four (or three) on the SlidingScaleOfLinearityVsOpenness. Competing terms include "Castletroid", "Castleroid", "Metrovania" and "non-linear action adventure platformer", with or without capitalization.

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Games in this genre tend to be a four (or three) on the SlidingScaleOfLinearityVsOpenness. Competing terms include "Castletroid", "Castleroid", "Metrovania" "Metrovania", "IGAvania", and "non-linear action adventure platformer", with or without capitalization.


* VideoGame/{{Dandara}} is a Metroidvania game where the player cannot run or jump and instead explores the world by climbing and swinging through it.

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* VideoGame/{{Dandara}} is a Metroidvania game where the player cannot run or jump and instead explores the world by climbing and swinging through it.zipping from one flat surface to another.


Unfortunately, [[IThoughtItMeant this is not a crossover between]] ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}''... but it so should be.

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Unfortunately, [[IThoughtItMeant [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant this is not a crossover between]] ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}''... but it so should be.


This sub-genre gets its name from the ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' series. The TropeMaker was ''VideoGame/{{Metroid|1}}'', published in 1986, and subsequent ''Metroid'' games have consistently used it in all of its installments (except ''Prime Pinball''). ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' first used the style in 1986's ''Vampire Killer'' and 1987's ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIISimonsQuest'', before abandoning it and then returning to it after the success of ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'', the TropeCodifier. The term itself was originally used for the ''Castlevania'' games of the same style as ''Symphony of the Night'', but Jeremy Parish of [[http://www.retronauts.com Retronauts,]] expanded the definition so that it referred to an entire genre; his use of the term popularized it, and along with it his definition. Ironically, the designer of ''Symphony of the Night'' actually modeled that game on the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series, which also shares a number of traits with this genre though is often overlooked in discussions due to not being 2D sidescrolling.

While ''Metroid'' and ''Castlevania'' were the Trope Maker and Trope Codifier, respectively, the [[UrExample Ur Examples]] were ''VideoGame/BrainBreaker'' (1984/1985) and ''VideoGame/DragonSlayerIIXanadu'' (1985). Several early Metroidvania titles were inspired by ''Xanadu'', rather than ''Metroid'' or ''Castlevania''.

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This sub-genre gets its name from the ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' series. The TropeMaker was ''VideoGame/{{Metroid|1}}'', published in 1986, and subsequent ''Metroid'' games have consistently used it in all of its installments (except ''Prime Pinball''). ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' first used the style in 1986's ''Vampire Killer'' and 1987's ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIISimonsQuest'', before abandoning it and then returning to it after the success of ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'', the TropeCodifier. The term itself was originally used for the ''Castlevania'' games of the same style as ''Symphony of the Night'', but Jeremy Parish of [[http://www.retronauts.com Retronauts,]] expanded the definition so that it referred to an entire genre; his use of the term popularized it, and along with it his definition. Ironically, the designer of ''Symphony of the Night'' actually modeled that game on the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series, which also shares a number of traits with this genre though is often overlooked in discussions due to not being 2D sidescrolling.

side-scrolling.

While ''Metroid'' and ''Castlevania'' were the Trope Maker and Trope Codifier, respectively, the [[UrExample Ur Examples]] were ''VideoGame/BrainBreaker'' (1984/1985) and ''VideoGame/DragonSlayerIIXanadu'' (1985). Several early Metroidvania titles were inspired by ''Xanadu'', rather than ''Metroid'' or ''Castlevania''.
these titles, particularly ''Xanadu''. Metroidvania elements could be traced further back to non-platformer games ''VideoGame/{{Tutankham}}'' (1982) and ''VisualNovel/ThePortopiaSerialMurderCase'' (1983).


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* ''VisualNovel/ThePortopiaSerialMurderCase'', released in 1983, could be considered an early first-person Metroidvania. It had key Metroidvania elements, such as an open world with interconnecting areas, backtracking to previous locations, and finding new items to unlock previous areas.


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* ''VideoGame/{{Tutankham}}'', released in 1982, could be considered a proto-Metroidvania, as it had some Metroidvania elements.


* ''VideoGame/TheIconoclasts'' by Joachim "Creator/{{konjak}}" Sandberg

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* ''VideoGame/TheIconoclasts'' ''VideoGame/{{Iconoclasts}}'' by Joachim "Creator/{{konjak}}" Sandberg

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* VideoGame/{{Dandara}} is a Metroidvania game where the player cannot run or jump and instead explores the world by climbing and swinging through it.

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* ''VideoGame/ClarencesBigChance'': Sort of. Though the game itself is very linear, each level is very open and full of secrets.





While ''Metroid'' and ''Castlevania'' were the Trope Maker and Trope Codifier, respectively, the [[UrExample Ur Examples]] were ''VideoGame/BrainBreaker'' (1984/1985) ''VideoGame/DragonSlayerIIXanadu'' (1985). Several early Metroidvania titles were inspired by ''Xanadu'', rather than ''Metroid'' or ''Castlevania''.

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While ''Metroid'' and ''Castlevania'' were the Trope Maker and Trope Codifier, respectively, the [[UrExample Ur Examples]] were ''VideoGame/BrainBreaker'' (1984/1985) and ''VideoGame/DragonSlayerIIXanadu'' (1985). Several early Metroidvania titles were inspired by ''Xanadu'', rather than ''Metroid'' or ''Castlevania''.

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