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* In the ''Series/CriminalMinds'' episode "Legacy," the unsub has converted an old meat-packing plant into a torture house. He abducts homeless people, prostitutes, and other "undesirables" off the street, knocks them out, and plants them in the middle of the facility. They have until sundown to escape [[spoiler: or so he tells them]]. Features include: a room covered in shards of broken glass (did I mention he takes their shoes first?), incinerators, vents that spew gas, and a pack of vicious dogs. Probably inspired by H. H. Holmes (see RealLife section below).


* Used for fun in ''Tecmo's VideoGame/{{Deception}}''. In the sequels, even the buildings inhabited by the heroes are filled with [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal death-dealing devices]] which never shut off.

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* Used for fun in ''Tecmo's VideoGame/{{Deception}}''. In the sequels, even the buildings inhabited by the heroes are filled with [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal death-dealing devices]] devices which never shut off.


* Standard in ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}''. Though there are some "canon" examples in the randomly generated structures (eg. both types of temples), the mot prominent ones occur on multiplayer. In a vanilla Mine craft server, there is no protection against someone murdering you, stealing your stuff, and razing your base or house, making you a noob again. Though many servers have mods to prevent this, some don't or make you donate (pay) to use them. So what are you to do? Why integrate as many traps into your house as possible to kill any would be thieves of course! Nearly every serious player's house will have many traps and decoy treasure rooms, and they will have to go through great lengths navigating their own traps every time they want to deposit or withdrawal so much as an iron ingot from their horde. However in mine craft you can always mine blocks so there is no trap that can't be successfully or destroyed, so expect lots of obsidian to try to RailRoad you into forcing to go down the trapped paths an make you solve the puzzles. Many players even go a step further and, taking a page from every super villain, rig their buildings to self destruct with TNT upon command, so no one benefits from stealing.

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* Standard in ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}''. Though there are some "canon" examples in the randomly generated structures (eg. both types of temples), the mot most prominent ones occur on multiplayer. In a vanilla Mine craft Minecraft server, there is no protection against someone murdering you, stealing your stuff, and razing your base or house, making you a noob again. Though many servers have mods to prevent this, some don't or make you donate (pay) to use them. So what are you to do? Why integrate as many traps into your house as possible to kill any would be thieves of course! Nearly every serious player's house will have many traps and decoy treasure rooms, and they will have to go through great lengths navigating their own traps every time they want to deposit or withdrawal so much as an iron ingot from their horde. However in mine craft Minecraft you can always mine blocks so there is no trap that can't be successfully or destroyed, so expect lots of obsidian to try to RailRoad you into forcing to go down the trapped paths an and make you solve the puzzles. Many players even go a step further and, taking a page from every super villain, rig their buildings to self destruct with TNT upon command, so no one benefits from stealing.



* Pops up in virtually every level of ''VideoGame/NinjaSenki''. There are large gaps requiring pixel-perfect double-jumps to get through, caves with floors, ceilings and occasionally walls laden with instant-kill spikes, dissapearing platforms you have to jump on, jets of high-temperature flame to bypass, a section requiring the player to jump off of water's surface or else drown ... You're a ninja, technically, and so are your antagonists (when they aren't ghosts, demons or worse), but that seems like an overkill even for them.

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* Pops up in virtually every level of ''VideoGame/NinjaSenki''. There are large gaps requiring pixel-perfect double-jumps to get through, caves with floors, ceilings and occasionally walls laden with instant-kill spikes, dissapearing disappearing platforms you have to jump on, jets of high-temperature flame to bypass, a section requiring the player to jump off of water's surface or else drown ... You're a ninja, technically, and so are your antagonists (when they aren't ghosts, demons or worse), but that seems like an overkill even for them.



* ''VideoGame/Portal1'' and ''VideoGame/Portal2'' have the Aperture Science Enrichment Center, where some of the tests are potentially lethal, and the whole place is controlled by a malicious A.I. At one point in Portal 2, you find the remains of the employee nursery and "Bring Your Daughter to Work Day" mentioned in the first game. It's in the bowels of Aperture, [[NoOSHACompliance a few feet away from a giant device that produces and distributes neurotoxin]]. Although, the test chambers themselves can't count because they are designed to be lethal and dangerous. There's no excuse for everywhere else though. Similarly, in Portal, after chamber 19 [[spoiler:you have to go through the place where people work in order to get to the boss battle]]. And that place is a maze of dedly pistons and portal puzzles.

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* ''VideoGame/Portal1'' and ''VideoGame/Portal2'' have the Aperture Science Enrichment Center, where some of the tests are potentially lethal, and the whole place is controlled by a malicious A.I. At one point in Portal 2, you find the remains of the employee nursery and "Bring Your Daughter to Work Day" mentioned in the first game. It's in the bowels of Aperture, [[NoOSHACompliance a few feet away from a giant device that produces and distributes neurotoxin]]. Although, the test chambers themselves can't count because they are designed to be lethal and dangerous. There's no excuse for everywhere else though. Similarly, in Portal, after chamber 19 [[spoiler:you have to go through the place where people work in order to get to the boss battle]]. And that place is a maze of dedly deadly pistons and portal puzzles.



* You generally got one section of this per indoor level in ''Franchise/Starcraft'', although once during Brood War you got to make it ''work for you''.

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* You generally got one section of this per indoor level in ''Franchise/Starcraft'', although once during Brood War you got get to make it ''work for you''.



* The underworld of Atlantis in Literature/{{Grailblazers}} may not actively try to kill you, but the results are indistingushable when the corridor you were running along suddenly changes into a spiral staircase, causing you to plummet at full speed. This is a side effect of the relocation spell which moves Atlantis (the ultimate offshore banking haven) randomly around the world every 30 seconds.

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* The underworld of Atlantis in Literature/{{Grailblazers}} may not actively try to kill you, but the results are indistingushable indistinguishable when the corridor you were running along suddenly changes into a spiral staircase, causing you to plummet at full speed. This is a side effect of the relocation spell which moves Atlantis (the ultimate offshore banking haven) randomly around the world every 30 seconds.



* an entertainment variant is the Escape Room, in which participants are locked inside and must discover and decipher puzzles and clues in a set amount of time to free themselves.

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* an An entertainment variant is the Escape Room, in which participants are locked inside and must discover and decipher puzzles and clues in a set amount of time to free themselves.

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* ''Series/{{Dexter}} featured a serial killer who transformed his house into a murder maze.


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* an entertainment variant is the Escape Room, in which participants are locked inside and must discover and decipher puzzles and clues in a set amount of time to free themselves.


* ''Frachise/MortalKombat'' has {{Stage Fatalit|y}}ies, which are special Fatalities the winner of a match can use to kill his/her opponent using the rather hazardous nature of the specific arena. The first one was The Pit in the first game, which simply required the winner to uppercut the loser to drop him down into the spiked pit below. Several other games in the series had Stage Fatalities with spikes, but many were far more creative (some involved throwing your opponent into acid, crushing walls, lava, or even a laser grid that dices the victim. Some don't even use actual architecture; in the Living Forest, you throw your victim to carnivorous trees.) ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' also had a special version called Death Traps, which like Brutalities, could kill your opponent (or you, if you don't look where you're going) even if his Life Bar wasn't empty, sort of the Kombat version of a ring-out. There was even one arena, the Falling Cliffs, that with a Death Trap that could kill both Kombatant's at once. (If that happened, the player who had taken the least amount of damage won the match.)

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* ''Frachise/MortalKombat'' ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' has {{Stage Fatalit|y}}ies, which are special Fatalities the winner of a match can use to kill his/her opponent using the rather hazardous nature of the specific arena. The first one was The Pit in the first game, which simply required the winner to uppercut the loser to drop him down into the spiked pit below. Several other games in the series had Stage Fatalities with spikes, but many were far more creative (some involved throwing your opponent into acid, crushing walls, lava, or even a laser grid that dices the victim. Some don't even use actual architecture; in the Living Forest, you throw your victim to carnivorous trees.) ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' also had a special version called Death Traps, which like Brutalities, could kill your opponent (or you, if you don't look where you're going) even if his Life Bar wasn't empty, sort of the Kombat version of a ring-out. There was even one arena, the Falling Cliffs, that with a Death Trap that could kill both Kombatant's at once. (If that happened, the player who had taken the least amount of damage won the match.)


* Much thought has gone into preventing members of unknown future societies from accidentally or deliberately digging up [[https://www.damninteresting.com/this-place-is-not-a-place-of-honor/ radioactive waste]], which can remain dangerous to human life for hundreds of thousands of years. Needless to say, such a timeframe precludes depending on a simple written warning to convey the right message. Some of the proposed solutions have involved marking the burial sites with hostile structures designed to deter people from exploring the surrounding areas. This is an interesting example in that the design intent is entirely benevolent.

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* Much thought has gone into preventing members of unknown future societies from accidentally or deliberately digging up [[https://www.damninteresting.com/this-place-is-not-a-place-of-honor/ Much thought]] has gone into preventing members of unknown future societies from accidentally or deliberately digging up radioactive waste]], waste, which can remain dangerous to human life for hundreds of thousands of years. Needless to say, such a timeframe precludes depending on a simple written warning to convey the right message. Some of the proposed solutions have involved marking the burial sites with hostile structures designed to deter people from exploring the surrounding areas. This is an interesting example in that the design intent is entirely benevolent.


* Much thought has gone into preventing members of unknown future societies from accidentally or deliberately digging up [[https://www.damninteresting.com/this-place-is-not-a-place-of-honor/ radioactive waste]], which can remain dangerous to human life for hundreds of thousands of years. Needless to say, such a timeframe precludes depending on a simple written warning to convey the right message. Some of the proposed solutions have involved marking the burial sites with hostile structures designed to deter people from exploring the area. This is an interesting example in that the design intent is entirely benevolent.

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* Much thought has gone into preventing members of unknown future societies from accidentally or deliberately digging up [[https://www.damninteresting.com/this-place-is-not-a-place-of-honor/ radioactive waste]], which can remain dangerous to human life for hundreds of thousands of years. Needless to say, such a timeframe precludes depending on a simple written warning to convey the right message. Some of the proposed solutions have involved marking the burial sites with hostile structures designed to deter people from exploring the area.surrounding areas. This is an interesting example in that the design intent is entirely benevolent.

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* Much thought has gone into preventing members of unknown future societies from accidentally or deliberately digging up [[https://www.damninteresting.com/this-place-is-not-a-place-of-honor/ radioactive waste]], which can remain dangerous to human life for hundreds of thousands of years. Needless to say, such a timeframe precludes depending on a simple written warning to convey the right message. Some of the proposed solutions have involved marking the burial sites with hostile structures designed to deter people from exploring the area. This is an interesting example in that the design intent is entirely benevolent.


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* ''TabletopGame/ThirteenthAge'' has 'Living Dungeons' - living agglomerations of subterranean architecture that swim through the ground, occasionally surfacing to lure in unlucky heroes and monsters or devour new buildings to add to their ever-shifting bodies. The biggest and most terrible of these is the titular villain and setting of the module ''Eyes of the Stone Thief''.


* For whatever reason, ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms, and power plants containing burning pipes and toxic waste pools.

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* For whatever reason, ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms, and power plants containing burning pipes and toxic waste pools.



* The Azran sites you visit in various ''Franchise/ProfessorLayton'' games most notably in "Miracle Mask" and "Azran Legacy" where you deal with killer robots, spiked floors, and trap rooms that you can only proceed if you can solve a puzzle.

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* The Azran sites you visit in various ''Franchise/ProfessorLayton'' ''VideoGame/ProfessorLayton'' games most notably in "Miracle Mask" and "Azran Legacy" where you deal with killer robots, spiked floors, and trap rooms that you can only proceed if you can solve a puzzle.

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* [[TemptingFate The S.S. "Literally Can't Sink"]] from ''VideoGame/AHatInTime'', considering it's supposed to be a cruise ship for passengers, either has a bunch of off-screen elevators Hat Kid can't use or is basically one big architectural flaw. Slightly justified by every single one of its crew (except the captain) being ''completely'' incompetent at their jobs.

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*** Hyrule Castle in general falls into this trope (if used as a dungeon and not as another location), but the version in Twilight Princess takes it a step further by having Link climb the main tower platform by platform to get to the throne room. One has to wonder how Zelda manages to do that every day.


* In ''Series/ThePrisoner'' episode ''The Girl Who Was Death'', she lures him into a ghost town, to a block of shops for a butcher, baker, and candlestick maker, each equipped with lethal booby traps inspired by their trade.

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* In ''Series/ThePrisoner'' ''Series/ThePrisoner1967'' episode ''The "The Girl Who Was Death'', Death", she lures him into a ghost town, to a block of shops for a butcher, baker, and candlestick maker, each equipped with lethal booby traps inspired by their trade.


* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by one of the Renegades in ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'', who complains about Botta feeling the need to make overly-complicated security systems.

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* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by one One of the Renegades in ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'', who ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'' complains about Botta feeling the need to make overly-complicated security systems.



* In the [[FreewareGames freeware]] ''VideoGame/BinaryBoy'', you have a beautiful green field... which has stumps with man-sized balls spinning around, and meter-tall red blades flipping up and down, both very much lethal to the protagonist.

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* In the [[FreewareGames freeware]] ''VideoGame/BinaryBoy'', you have a beautiful green field... which has stumps with man-sized balls spinning around, and meter-tall red blades flipping up and down, both very much lethal to the protagonist.



* In ''EvilGenius'', you have to make the choice between making corridors easy for minions to use and filling them with traps against enemy agents: there's very little common ground between the two.

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* In ''EvilGenius'', ''VideoGame/EvilGenius'', you have to make the choice between making corridors easy for minions to use and filling them with traps against enemy agents: there's very little common ground between the two.



* In ''VideoGame/HalfLife'', Gordon Freeman frequently needs to turn on equipment, but the required buttons, valves and switches are in dangerous or unlikely locations, such as underwater or on the wrong side of an enormous fan.

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* In ''VideoGame/HalfLife'', ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'', Gordon Freeman frequently needs to turn on equipment, but the required buttons, valves and switches are in dangerous or unlikely locations, such as underwater or on the wrong side of an enormous fan.



* ''VideoGame/{{Jumper}}'' games consume this trope for breakfast, dinner, lunch and supper 7 times a week. The first game is partly {{justified|Trope}} in that it takes place in AbandonedLaboratory. Still doesn't make sense how it is [[BenevolentArchitecture still perfectly navigable]].

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Jumper}}'' games consume this trope for breakfast, dinner, lunch and supper 7 times a week. The first game series is partly {{justified|Trope}} in chock-full of buildings that it takes place seem to be made with challenging agile creatures in AbandonedLaboratory. Still doesn't make sense how it is [[BenevolentArchitecture mind than serving any other purpose, from an {{abandoned laboratory}} with numerous cannons to a factory that even ''without'' delibarately-placed traps still perfectly navigable]].looks [[NoOSHACompliance work-unsafe]], to jungles and windswept mountains that have far more spikes and electricity than could be naturally possible.



** ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'': The [[ThatOneLevel Stone Tower Temple]] is so complex, that it requires completing half of it by fighting its first mini boss for [[LightEmUp the Light Arrows]]. Then you have to exit the temple, fire an arrow at the crystal beneath the entrance to turn the temple and the surrounding environment ''[[MindScrew upside-down]]'', before going back inside to complete the other half[[note]]commonly referred to as "The Inverted Temple"[[/note]]. Which will require you to cross open expanses, while trying not to fall into the sky!

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'': The [[ThatOneLevel Stone Tower Temple]] is so complex, that it requires completing half of it by fighting its first mini boss for [[LightEmUp the Light Arrows]]. Then you have to exit the temple, fire an arrow at the crystal beneath the entrance to turn the temple and the surrounding environment ''[[MindScrew upside-down]]'', ''upside-down'', before going back inside to complete the other half[[note]]commonly referred to as "The Inverted Temple"[[/note]]. Which will require you to cross open expanses, while trying not to fall into the sky!



* ''Frachise/MortalKombat'' has [[StageFatality Stage Fatalities]], which are special Fatalities the winner of a match can use to kill his/her opponent using the rather hazardous nature of the specific arena. The first one was The Pit in the first game, which simply required the winner to uppercut the loser to drop him down into the spiked pit below. Several other games in the series had Stage Fatalities with spikes, but many were far more creative (some involved throwing your opponent into acid, crushing walls, lava, or even a laser grid that dices the victim. Some don't even use actual architecture; in the Living Forest, you throw your victim to carnivorous trees.) ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' also had a special version called Death Traps, which like Brutalities, could kill your opponent (or you, if you don't look where you're going) even if his Life Bar wasn't empty, sort of the Kombat version of a ring-out. There was even one arena, the Falling Cliffs, that with a Death Trap that could kill both Kombatant's at once. (If that happened, the player who had taken the least amount of damage won the match.)

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* ''Frachise/MortalKombat'' has [[StageFatality Stage Fatalities]], {{Stage Fatalit|y}}ies, which are special Fatalities the winner of a match can use to kill his/her opponent using the rather hazardous nature of the specific arena. The first one was The Pit in the first game, which simply required the winner to uppercut the loser to drop him down into the spiked pit below. Several other games in the series had Stage Fatalities with spikes, but many were far more creative (some involved throwing your opponent into acid, crushing walls, lava, or even a laser grid that dices the victim. Some don't even use actual architecture; in the Living Forest, you throw your victim to carnivorous trees.) ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' also had a special version called Death Traps, which like Brutalities, could kill your opponent (or you, if you don't look where you're going) even if his Life Bar wasn't empty, sort of the Kombat version of a ring-out. There was even one arena, the Falling Cliffs, that with a Death Trap that could kill both Kombatant's at once. (If that happened, the player who had taken the least amount of damage won the match.)



* The builders of the ''[[VideoGame/{{Marathon}} U.E.S.C. Marathon]]'' decided to put crushing elevators and huge pits of lava in a ''civilian residential area'', among other things. Oh, and the seven-platform puzzle which is monstrously difficult and requires an hour of trekking back and forth between control rooms which activate a ''mechanical staircase'' to get to the [[GoshDangItToHeck friggin']] ''observatory''. Some of it is justified, since the AI in charge of doors, lifts, and platforms has gone ''quite'' [[AIIsACrapshoot insane]], so things aren't working properly. There's no excuse for the lava, though.

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* The In ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'', the builders of the ''[[VideoGame/{{Marathon}} U.E.S.C. Marathon]]'' ''Marathon'' decided to put crushing elevators and huge pits of lava in a ''civilian residential area'', among other things. Oh, and the seven-platform puzzle which is monstrously difficult and requires an hour of trekking back and forth between control rooms which activate a ''mechanical staircase'' to get to the [[GoshDangItToHeck friggin']] friggin' ''observatory''. Some of it is justified, since the AI in charge of doors, lifts, and platforms has gone ''quite'' [[AIIsACrapshoot insane]], so things aren't working properly. There's no excuse for the lava, though.



* The ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series generally [[AvertedTrope averts]] this, although the haphazardly arranged [[ExplodingBarrels volatile containers]] [[NoOSHACompliance are another issue]]. One location in the [[VideoGame/MassEffect2 second game]] has this fully in force: Jarrahe Station. The station is accessed after finding a crashed freighter on an uncharted world in which the security mechs it had been transporting [[AIIsACrapshoot got a virus, went crazy, and started killing the crew and randomly self-destructing]]. You trace the ship back to Jarrahe Station. You go on board to find that everyone is dead. Apparently the station's VI was infected with the same virus and killed the crew as they attempted to shut it down and reset the system. Mostly the station is just kind of creepy. Then you get to engineering. (The Malevolent Architecture comes into play here). The hallways in the section appear to have steam venting into them. Then the computer tells that it's actual plasma venting into the hallways. So then you have to make your way to the controls way in the back of the section, dodging the vents along the way to restore power to the section and shut the vents down. The plasma was venting due to the AxeCrazy VI running the place, but one wonders [[FridgeLogic why there were plasma vents in the hallways in the first place.]]

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* The ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series generally [[AvertedTrope averts]] {{avert|edTrope}}s this, although the haphazardly arranged [[ExplodingBarrels volatile containers]] [[NoOSHACompliance are another issue]]. One location in the [[VideoGame/MassEffect2 second game]] has this fully in force: Jarrahe Station. The station is accessed after finding a crashed freighter on an uncharted world in which the security mechs it had been transporting [[AIIsACrapshoot got a virus, went crazy, and started killing the crew and randomly self-destructing]]. You trace the ship back to Jarrahe Station. You go on board to find that everyone is dead. Apparently the station's VI was infected with the same virus and killed the crew as they attempted to shut it down and reset the system. Mostly the station is just kind of creepy. Then you get to engineering. (The Malevolent Architecture comes into play here). The engineering where the hallways in the section appear to have steam venting into them. Then the computer tells that it's actual plasma venting into the hallways. So then you have to make your way to the controls way in the back of the section, dodging the vents along the way to restore power to the section and shut the vents down. The plasma was venting due to the AxeCrazy VI running the place, but one wonders [[FridgeLogic why there were plasma vents in the hallways in the first place.]]



* ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'' have the Aperture Science Enrichment Center, where some of the tests are potentially lethal, and the whole place is controlled by a malicious A.I. At one point in Portal 2, you find the remains of the employee nursery and "Bring Your Daughter to Work Day" mentioned in the first game. It's in the bowels of Aperture, [[NoOSHACompliance a few feet away from a giant device that produces and distributes neurotoxin]]. Although, the test chambers themselves can't count because they are designed to be lethal and dangerous. There's no excuse for everywhere else though. Similarly, in Portal, after chamber 19 [[spoiler:you have to go through the place where people work in order to get to the boss battle]]. And that place is a maze of dedly pistons and portal puzzles.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'' ''VideoGame/Portal1'' and ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'' ''VideoGame/Portal2'' have the Aperture Science Enrichment Center, where some of the tests are potentially lethal, and the whole place is controlled by a malicious A.I. At one point in Portal 2, you find the remains of the employee nursery and "Bring Your Daughter to Work Day" mentioned in the first game. It's in the bowels of Aperture, [[NoOSHACompliance a few feet away from a giant device that produces and distributes neurotoxin]]. Although, the test chambers themselves can't count because they are designed to be lethal and dangerous. There's no excuse for everywhere else though. Similarly, in Portal, after chamber 19 [[spoiler:you have to go through the place where people work in order to get to the boss battle]]. And that place is a maze of dedly pistons and portal puzzles.



* In ''[[Franchise/StarWars Jedi Academy]]'', in the second level on Vjun, about two-thirds of the way through the game, you start in a hanger with the series's star Kyle Katarn, who immediately runs to the locked elevator, then starts talking about how the switch to summon it is hidden in a control panel fourteen floors up, and generally [[LampshadeHanging mocks]] the trope he has lived in for about five games so far. This sequence is easy to miss as the real exit is blatantly obvious and closer than the elevator; approaching it starts a new {{cutscene}} where Kyle makes more comments about your next stop being a garbage compactor.

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* In ''[[Franchise/StarWars Jedi Academy]]'', ''VideoGame/JediAcademy'', in the second level on Vjun, about two-thirds of the way through the game, you start in a hanger with the series's star Kyle Katarn, who immediately runs to the locked elevator, then starts talking about how the switch to summon it is hidden in a control panel fourteen floors up, and generally [[LampshadeHanging mocks]] mocks the trope he has lived in for about five games so far. This sequence is easy to miss as the real exit is blatantly obvious and closer than the elevator; approaching it starts a new {{cutscene}} where Kyle makes more comments about your next stop being a garbage compactor.



* Largely averted in the ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}''; the levels are usually pretty logical and you get the impression that people COULD live in them; there are kitchens, bathrooms, toilets, etc. There are still some exceptions, though.
** Constantine's mansion in "The Sword", from ''VideoGame/ThiefTheDarkProject''.

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* Largely averted in the ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}''; the levels are usually pretty logical and you get the impression that people COULD live in them; there are kitchens, bathrooms, toilets, etc. There are still some exceptions, though.
**
though, such as Constantine's mansion in "The Sword", from ''VideoGame/ThiefTheDarkProject''.



* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d at one point in ''VideoGame/VoodooVince'', in which the titular character stumbles upon a mansion that, for no apparent reason, contains a complex room-rotating system, and the narrator comments "wow, that must have been one screwed up architect."

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* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d at one point in In ''VideoGame/VoodooVince'', in which the titular eponymous character stumbles upon a mansion that, for no apparent reason, contains a complex room-rotating system, and the system. The then narrator comments "wow, that must have been one screwed up architect."



* The titular house in ''[[VideoGame/NancyDrew Nancy Drew: Curse of Blackmoor Manor]]'' contains an underground series of rotating rooms, chambers with collapsing floors and ceilings, and a door which will explode if a puzzle is completed incorrectly.

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* The titular eponymous house in ''[[VideoGame/NancyDrew Nancy Drew: Curse of Blackmoor Manor]]'' contains an underground series of rotating rooms, chambers with collapsing floors and ceilings, and a door which will explode if a puzzle is completed incorrectly.






* If we're looking for a pyramid-shaped building complete with [[ChaosArchitecture moving three-dimensional puzzle hallways and chambers]], where death can jump at you from every angle in the form of deadly monsters, look no further than the movie ''Film/AVPAlienVsPredator''. That pyramid was explicitly designed to be a maze where [[EverythingTryingToKillYou a lurking enemy]] ''[[EverythingTryingToKillYou is]]'' [[EverythingTryingToKillYou trying to kill you]] and the hunter can become the hunted.

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* If we're looking for a pyramid-shaped building complete with [[ChaosArchitecture moving three-dimensional puzzle hallways and chambers]], chambers, where death can jump at you from every angle in the form of deadly monsters, look no further than the movie ''Film/AVPAlienVsPredator''. That pyramid was explicitly designed to be a maze where [[EverythingTryingToKillYou a lurking enemy]] ''[[EverythingTryingToKillYou is]]'' [[EverythingTryingToKillYou trying to kill you]] and the hunter can become the hunted.



* The [[color:blue:house]] from ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves''. And not in the "ludicrously designed" sense, but in the "actively trying to eat the residents" sense.

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* The [[color:blue:house]] house from ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves''. And ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves'' is malevolent not in the "ludicrously designed" sense, but in the "actively trying to eat the residents" sense.



* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Discworld/ReaperMan'' features the Lost Jewelled TempleOfDoom of Offler the Crocodile God. The priests have a very easy time of it as, of the very few people who ever find the place, none gets past the DeathCourse, even as far as the jolly drawing of a thermometer for the Roof Repair Fund (a joke about the maintenance problems of old English churches, by the way). The priests barely look up from their game of cards to comment, "Heyup, another one for the big rolling ball, then." To date, two people have gotten through: one is Mrs. Cake, feared by all churches as a stubborn busybody, and the other is Death. When the latter showed up, the priests ran screaming, thinking it was the former. Essentially, their choices boiled down to [[Creator/EddieIzzard Cake or Death.]]
** The [[spoiler: mall organism]] from the same novel is a literal and ''living'' example of this trope.
** Also the Labyrinth in Ephebe as seen in Discword/SmallGods, and it gets redesigned every so often.

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* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/{{Discworld}}''
**
''Discworld/ReaperMan'' features the Lost Jewelled TempleOfDoom of Offler the Crocodile God. The priests have a very easy time of it as, of the very few people who ever find the place, none gets past the DeathCourse, even as far as the jolly drawing of a thermometer for the Roof Repair Fund (a joke about the maintenance problems of old English churches, by the way). The priests barely look up from their game of cards to comment, "Heyup, another one for the big rolling ball, then." To date, two people have gotten through: one is Mrs. Cake, feared by all churches as a stubborn busybody, and the other is Death. When the latter showed up, the priests ran screaming, thinking it was the former. Essentially, their choices boiled down to [[Creator/EddieIzzard Cake or Death.]]
**
]] The [[spoiler: mall organism]] from the same novel is a literal and ''living'' example of this trope.
** Also the The Labyrinth in Ephebe as seen in Discword/SmallGods, ''Discword/SmallGods'', and it gets redesigned every so often.






* ''Robot Wars'' (no, not the VideoGame/{{super|RobotWars}} kind) and ''Battlebots'', both shows featuring homemade combat machines, had the arena be as much of a potential threat at the other robots. Sawblades, spikes from the floor, fire coming from the ground, and many other things were available for potential damage. The former even had a [[BottomlessPits Pit Of Do... Oblivion]], which was an instant win if a team got the opponent in it, along with being a disposal bin of sorts for defeated robots; and the "Drop Zone", in which defeated robots are placed on a square on the ground with something very heavy hanging above. [[AnvilOnHead What's about to happen]] should be quite obvious.

to:

* ''Robot Wars'' (no, not the VideoGame/{{super|RobotWars}} kind) ''Series/RobotWars'' and ''Battlebots'', ''Series/{{Battlebots}}'', both shows featuring homemade combat machines, had the arena be as much of a potential threat at the other robots. Sawblades, spikes from the floor, fire coming from the ground, and many other things were available for potential damage. The former even had a [[BottomlessPits Pit Of Do... Oblivion]], which was an instant win if a team got the opponent in it, along with being a disposal bin of sorts for defeated robots; and the "Drop Zone", in which defeated robots are placed on a square on the ground with something very heavy hanging above. [[AnvilOnHead What's about to happen]] should be quite obvious.



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