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* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones (the chest itself contains the disembodied heart of the latter, and is the only means by which Jones can be killed)]]. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness at the hands of Beckett]]]] and settle down into a normal life with William. Meanwhile, NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: gain immortality (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A considerable amount of screen time is also devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo (which naturally leads to a considerable amount of MindScrew and [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Big-Lipped Alligator Moments]]), while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates (whom also have their own political structure and ''codebook'' that they must adhere to) reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]] and thereby allow Beckett to blackmail Jones into doing his bidding]]. As if all of this wasn't bad enough, another significant plot thread involves the various pirate legions deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines (which also requires an incantation ritual involving ''nine'' MacGuffin pieces)]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. This is without even mentioning [[spoiler: the kraken, which is anticlimactically killed off between the two films)]], the failed romance between Davy Jones and [[spoiler: Tia Dalma/Calpyso]], [[spoiler: Barbossa's return from the dead as per Calypso's will]], the gradual loss of sanity in [[spoiler: Will's father as he becomes evermore bound to ''The Flying Dutchman'']], or the numerous occasions upon which the characters incrementally relay all of this information to each other so that their later behaviours can be adjusted accordingly. Suffice to say, many if not ''most'' viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[DarknessInducedAudienceApathy had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones (the chest itself contains the disembodied heart of the latter, and is the only means by which Jones can be killed)]]. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness at the hands of Beckett]]]] and settle down into a normal life with William. Meanwhile, NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: gain immortality (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A considerable amount of screen time is also devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo (which naturally leads to a considerable amount has its own fair share of MindScrew and [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Big-Lipped Alligator Moments]]), while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates (whom also have their own political structure and ''codebook'' that they must adhere to) reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]] and thereby allow Beckett to blackmail Jones into doing his bidding]]. As if all of this wasn't bad enough, another significant plot thread involves the various pirate legions deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines (which also requires an incantation ritual involving ''nine'' MacGuffin pieces)]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. This is without even mentioning [[spoiler: the kraken, which is anticlimactically killed off between the two films)]], the failed romance between Davy Jones and [[spoiler: Tia Dalma/Calpyso]], [[spoiler: Barbossa's return from the dead as per Calypso's will]], the gradual loss of sanity in [[spoiler: Will's father as he becomes evermore bound to ''The Flying Dutchman'']], or the numerous occasions upon which the characters incrementally relay all of this information to each other so that their later behaviours can be adjusted accordingly. Suffice to say, many if not ''most'' viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[DarknessInducedAudienceApathy had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones (the chest itself contains the disembodied heart of the latter, and is the only means by which Jones can be killed)]]. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness at the hands of Beckett]]]] and settle down into a normal life with William. Meanwhile, NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: gain immortality (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A considerable amount of screen time is also devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo (which naturally leads to a considerable amount of MindScrew and [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Big-Lipped Alligator Moments]]), while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates (whom also have their own political structure and ''codebook'' that they must adhere to) reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]] and thereby allow Beckett to blackmail Jones into doing his bidding]] (as well as set up a cliffhanger between the two films). As if all of this wasn't bad enough, another significant plot thread involves the various pirate legions deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines (which also requires an incantation ritual involving ''nine'' MacGuffin pieces]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. All of this is without even mentioning the failed romance between Davy Jones and [[Tia Dalma/Calpyso]], or [[Barbossa's return from the dead as per Calpyso's will]], or the gradual loss of sanity in Will's father. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[DarknessInducedAudienceApathy had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones (the chest itself contains the disembodied heart of the latter, and is the only means by which Jones can be killed)]]. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness at the hands of Beckett]]]] and settle down into a normal life with William. Meanwhile, NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: gain immortality (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A considerable amount of screen time is also devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo (which naturally leads to a considerable amount of MindScrew and [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Big-Lipped Alligator Moments]]), while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates (whom also have their own political structure and ''codebook'' that they must adhere to) reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]] and thereby allow Beckett to blackmail Jones into doing his bidding]] (as well as set up a cliffhanger between the two films). bidding]]. As if all of this wasn't bad enough, another significant plot thread involves the various pirate legions deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines (which also requires an incantation ritual involving ''nine'' MacGuffin pieces]] pieces)]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. All of this This is without even mentioning [[spoiler: the kraken, which is anticlimactically killed off between the two films)]], the failed romance between Davy Jones and [[Tia [[spoiler: Tia Dalma/Calpyso]], or [[Barbossa's [[spoiler: Barbossa's return from the dead as per Calpyso's Calypso's will]], or the gradual loss of sanity in [[spoiler: Will's father. Needless father as he becomes evermore bound to ''The Flying Dutchman'']], or the numerous occasions upon which the characters incrementally relay all of this information to each other so that their later behaviours can be adjusted accordingly. Suffice to say, many if not most ''most'' viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[DarknessInducedAudienceApathy had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones (the chest itself contains the disembodied heart of the latter, and is the only means by which Jones can be killed)]]. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness at the hands of Beckett]]]] and settle down into a normal life with William. Meanwhile, NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: gain immortality (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A considerable amount of screen time is also devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]]]], thereby allowing Beckett to blackmail Jones into doing his bidding (as well as setting up a cliffhanger between the two films). As if all of that weren't bad enough, another major plot point involves the various pirate legions deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones (the chest itself contains the disembodied heart of the latter, and is the only means by which Jones can be killed)]]. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness at the hands of Beckett]]]] and settle down into a normal life with William. Meanwhile, NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: gain immortality (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A considerable amount of screen time is also devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, limbo (which naturally leads to a considerable amount of MindScrew and [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Big-Lipped Alligator Moments]]), while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates (whom also have their own political structure and ''codebook'' that they must adhere to) reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]]]], heart]] and thereby allowing allow Beckett to blackmail Jones into doing his bidding bidding]] (as well as setting set up a cliffhanger between the two films). As if all of that weren't this wasn't bad enough, another major significant plot point thread involves the various pirate legions deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] confines (which also requires an incantation ritual involving ''nine'' MacGuffin pieces]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. All of this is without even mentioning the failed romance between Davy Jones and [[Tia Dalma/Calpyso]], or [[Barbossa's return from the dead as per Calpyso's will]], or the gradual loss of sanity in Will's father. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords [[DarknessInducedAudienceApathy had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).
sequences]]).


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones]], while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death]] and settle down into a normal life with Will. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A not insignificant amount of the second film's running time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]]]] and thus set up a cliffhanger between the two films, and as if all of that weren't bad enough, nearly an ''hour'' of screen time is devoted to the pirates deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no narrative or thematic reason other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones]], while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death]] Jones (the chest itself contains the disembodied heart of the latter, and settle down into a normal life with Will. is the only means by which Jones can be killed)]]. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness at the hands of Beckett]]]] and settle down into a normal life with William. Meanwhile, NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal gain immortality (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A not insignificant considerable amount of the second film's running screen time is also devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]]]] and thus set heart]]]], thereby allowing Beckett to blackmail Jones into doing his bidding (as well as setting up a cliffhanger between the two films, and as films). As if all of that weren't bad enough, nearly an ''hour'' of screen time is devoted to another major plot point involves the pirates various pirate legions deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no narrative or thematic reason other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).sequences]]).


** NoExportForYou makes it even more annoying. Several plotlines in ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'' were introduced in ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII [[UpdatedRerelease Final Mix+]]''. [[spoiler:Xemnas and the Chamber of Repose, the Lingering Sentiment's origin, etc.]]

to:

** NoExportForYou makes it even more annoying. Several plotlines in ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'' were introduced in ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII [[UpdatedRerelease Final Mix+]]''. Mix]]''. [[spoiler:Xemnas and the Chamber of Repose, the Lingering Sentiment's Will's origin, etc.]]


The TropeNamer is a plant, one of Japan's top exports to the DeepSouth. It was initially imported as a way to improve the soil, but it quickly gained a reputation for growing all over the place, being very hard to rein in, and choking out other plants. Named after the same plant as AlienKudzu, but [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant the two tropes are unrelated]]. It's also [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant not to be confused with]] the NewspaperComic of [[ComicStrip/{{Kudzu}} the same name]].

to:

The TropeNamer is a plant, one of Japan's top exports to the DeepSouth. It was initially imported as a way to improve the soil, but it quickly gained a reputation for growing all over the place, being very hard to rein in, and choking out other plants. Named after the same plant as AlienKudzu, but [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant the two tropes are unrelated]]. It's also [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant not to be confused with]] the NewspaperComic ComicStrip of [[ComicStrip/{{Kudzu}} the same name]].






* ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'': Every Creator/BigFinish plotline spawns sequels, prequels and spinoff series. These in turn may get their own spinoff series. Standalone arcs have prose sequels, PerspectiveFlip special releases (which aren't available from Creator/BigFinish at all), and links to other ''Series/DoctorWho'' media. The Doctor will merrily take a vacation in ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' comics locations, meet up with Franchise/IrisWildthyme, and reference future events from the new TV series -- which only serve as fuel for new plotlines. Every trilogy has [[TrilogyCreep at least four parts]], and villains or companions from the early 2000s have a tendency to return a decade later for an entirely new story. In short, every little piece of Creator/BigFinish is connected and constantly growing.

to:

* ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'': Every Creator/BigFinish plotline spawns sequels, prequels and spinoff series. These in turn may get their own spinoff series. Standalone arcs have prose sequels, PerspectiveFlip special releases (which aren't available from Creator/BigFinish at all), and links to other ''Series/DoctorWho'' media. The Doctor will merrily take a vacation in ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' comics locations, meet up with Franchise/IrisWildthyme, and reference future events from the new TV series -- which only serve as fuel for new plotlines. Every trilogy has [[TrilogyCreep at least four parts]], and villains or companions from the early 2000s have a tendency to return a decade later for an entirely new story. In short, every little piece of Creator/BigFinish is connected and constantly growing.



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

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[[folder:Films -- Animated]]



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' had a huge number of bizarre twists and turns; some of them were designed to explain things, but as the show became more and more fantastic, these became [[EpilepticTrees fewer and crazier]]. By the finale, there were -- to quote ''Website/CollegeHumor'' -- some [[http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1936291 teeny-tiny loose ends yet to be tied up]].

to:

* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' had ''Series/TheFortyFourHundred'' did this. Probably intentionally, as with an ensemble cast you never know which plot hooks you'll have the opportunity to follow up next. It did get pretty annoying, though, when the biggest teaser at the end of season 2 didn't show up until halfway through season 3.
* ''Series/AmericanGothic1995'' has
a huge number of bizarre twists dangling plot threads, most of which can be attributed to it being ScrewedByTheNetwork and turns; some of them were designed to explain things, but as CutShort; the show became more and more fantastic, these became [[EpilepticTrees fewer and crazier]]. By the finale, never got to address whether Buck will ever be stopped, or whether Caleb will turn evil, or whose side Selena is really on. But there were -- to quote ''Website/CollegeHumor'' -- some [[http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1936291 teeny-tiny loose real head-scratchers, such as whether Sutpen in "Damned If You Don't" is [[spoiler:really a ghost Buck summoned]], whether Buck [[spoiler:[[DrivenToSuicide drove his girlfriend to suicide]]]], or whether Selena would ever reconcile with her father -- and what happened to him in the first place. That last one is particularly distressing, as the episode in question was [[ExecutiveMeddling never aired]], so very few people even know it exists.
* The ill-fated TV adaptation of ''Series/{{Animorphs}}'' was forced to condense an entire season's worth of plots into a 90-minute three-part episode. The result, while superior to anything else the second season produced, is deeply confusing and disjointed, and the episode (and series)
ends yet with many of these plots still unresolved.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' was tightly plotted from the beginning and manages to maintain a tight story throughout. Unfortunately, numerous plot threads from early in the series had
to be tied up]].quietly dropped when the plot had to be modified to account for cast changes. Among the casualties: The data recording Kosh made of Talia Winter's fears, Captain Sheridan's knowledge of secret societies and black projects and Catherine Sakai's growing involvement with shady mega-corp exploitation of dead worlds - although the last one was resolved in one of the tie-in novels.
* The people behind the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' were always fairly open that 75% of the show was being made up as they went along, leading to a fair amount of Kudzu by the end. The writers made a valiant attempt to wrap everything up, but plenty of mysteries were just dealt with by using a blatant InfoDump and a HandWave saying [[spoiler:it was [[AWizardDidIt God's will]].]]
* ''Series/CoronetBlue'' was a 60s show about a guy with [[LaserGuidedAmnesia no memory]] except for the titular ArcWords. The show only ran for a single season, and they never got to resolve anything.



** There are some plot threads still left dangling from the old series, including the "Doctor is Merlin" thread (Season 26), the war between the Time Lords and the Great Vampires (Season 18), and whatever really happened in the 51st century. It took six seasons just to reveal the name of the Doctor's ''race''.

to:

** There are some plot threads still left dangling from the old series, including the "Doctor is Merlin" thread (Season 26), ([[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E1Battlefield "Battlefield"]]), the war between the Time Lords and the Great Vampires (Season 18), ([[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E4StateOfDecay "State of Decay"]]), and whatever really happened in the 51st century. It took six seasons just to reveal the name of the Doctor's ''race''.



** Showrunner Creator/RussellTDavies tied up many of the loose ends he left but there's still a lot unexplained from his tenure, including the exact means by which Rose came back from a parallel dimension, and pretty much anything to do with her in "Turn Left".
** Creator/StevenMoffat's era, Series 5-10, quickly gained a reputation for this sort of thing. For instance, Series 5 left all sorts of dangling plot threads, like who the Silence is, who [[spoiler:took control of the TARDIS]] in "The Pandorica Opens", who River Song is, and why [[spoiler:the TARDIS blowing up would destroy the Universe]] (which even the Doctor admits he's not sure about). He resolved almost all of these in Series 6, only to raise even ''more'' questions. This pattern has continued throughout his tenure with each series bringing in more outlandish situations, some of which will likely never be answered -- such as how, post-series 9, [[spoiler: Clara Oswald returns to her final death]]. ''Sometimes'' he would take the opportunity to resolve something that's been dangling for several series out of the blue. The ChristmasEpisode post-Series 9 explained [[spoiler:the circumstances of River's last night with the Doctor on Darillium]], which had been hanging since Series 4. The Series 10 SeasonFinale revealed [[spoiler: what happened to the Harold Saxon Master after "The End of Time" and how he regenerated into Missy from there]]. And then [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E12TheDoctorFalls that same episode]] left dangling [[spoiler: the fate of Nardole and the solar farmers (who apparently are doomed to forever fight Cybermen on a giant spaceship caught in a black hole), whether Missy was able to survive being killed by Saxon, whether Bill ever meets the Doctor (whom she thought dead) again, the fates of those she knew on Earth, what became of the Vault beneath St. Luke's and the Doctor's teaching job]], ''and'' of course the origin of the spaceship that left the fuel puddle that transformed Heather back in the season premiere! Twelve's GrandFinale, "Twice Upon a Time", only wrapped up ''three'' plot threads: [[spoiler: what became of Rusty the Dalek, the Doctor's inability to remember Clara Oswald, and his guilt over Bill's fate]].

to:

** Showrunner Creator/RussellTDavies tied up many of the loose ends he left but there's still a lot unexplained from his tenure, including the exact means by which Rose came back from a parallel dimension, and pretty much anything to do with her in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E11TurnLeft "Turn Left".
Left"]].
** Creator/StevenMoffat's era, Series 5-10, quickly gained a reputation for this sort of thing. For instance, Series 5 left all sorts of dangling plot threads, like who the Silence is, who [[spoiler:took control of the TARDIS]] in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E12ThePandoricaOpens "The Pandorica Opens", Opens"]], who River Song is, and why [[spoiler:the TARDIS blowing up would destroy the Universe]] (which even the Doctor admits he's not sure about). He resolved almost all of these in Series 6, only to raise even ''more'' questions. This pattern has continued throughout his tenure with each series bringing in more outlandish situations, some of which will likely never be answered -- such as how, post-series 9, [[spoiler: Clara [[spoiler:Clara Oswald returns to her final death]]. ''Sometimes'' he would take the opportunity to resolve something that's been dangling for several series out of the blue. The ChristmasEpisode post-Series 9 explained [[spoiler:the circumstances of River's last night with the Doctor on Darillium]], which had been hanging since Series 4. The Series 10 SeasonFinale revealed [[spoiler: what happened to the Harold Saxon Master after [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E17E18TheEndOfTime "The End of Time" Time"]] and how he regenerated into Missy from there]]. And then [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E12TheDoctorFalls that same episode]] left dangling [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the fate of Nardole and the solar farmers (who apparently are doomed to forever fight Cybermen on a giant spaceship caught in a black hole), whether Missy was able to survive being killed by Saxon, whether Bill ever meets the Doctor (whom she thought dead) again, the fates of those she knew on Earth, what became of the Vault beneath St. Luke's and the Doctor's teaching job]], ''and'' of course the origin of the spaceship that left the fuel puddle that transformed Heather back in the season premiere! Twelve's GrandFinale, [[Recap/DoctorWho2017CSTwiceUponATime "Twice Upon a Time", Time"]], only wrapped up ''three'' plot threads: [[spoiler: what [[spoiler:what became of Rusty the Dalek, the Doctor's inability to remember Clara Oswald, and his guilt over Bill's fate]].



** Creator/MarkGatiss pokes fun at ''Doctor Who'''s tendency to do this in the comedy sketch "The Pitch of Fear", where he imagines someone trying to pitch the show to a BBC executive in the 1960s -- having already planned out ''everything'' that happens from that point on, totally unaware of how absurd it sounds when you realize much of it was WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants in RealLife. Just the description of all the different Doctors is ridiculous.
-->'''Mr Borusa''': How long do you envisage the show running?
-->'''Sydney Newman''': Um. Er... ''({{Beat}})'' Twenty-six years.
** At this point, there are some '''huge''' questions the fandom has by and large accepted will/can '''never''' be answered, despite occasional hints/teases in the new series. These include the identities and fates of family members of the Doctor (his first wife in particular) besides Susan Foreman, the ultimate fate of Susan herself, the reason he ran away from Gallifrey in the first place (he usually claims it's boredom, but "Heaven Sent" has him saying it's [[spoiler: fear of...what?]]), and his birth name.
* ''Series/AmericanGothic1995'' has a number of dangling plot threads, most of which can be attributed to it being ScrewedByTheNetwork and CutShort; the show never got to address whether Buck will ever be stopped, or whether Caleb will turn evil, or whose side Selena is really on. But there were some real head-scratchers, such as whether Sutpen in "Damned If You Don't" is [[spoiler:really a ghost Buck summoned]], whether Buck [[spoiler:[[DrivenToSuicide drove his girlfriend to suicide]]]], or whether Selena would ever reconcile with her father -- and what happened to him in the first place. That last one is particularly distressing, as the episode in question was [[ExecutiveMeddling never aired]], so very few people even know it exists.
* ''Series/CoronetBlue'' was a 60s show about a guy with [[LaserGuidedAmnesia no memory]] except for the titular ArcWords. The show only ran for a single season, and they never got to resolve anything.

to:

** Creator/MarkGatiss pokes fun at ''Doctor Who'''s Who''[='s=] tendency to do this in the comedy sketch "The Pitch of Fear", where he imagines someone trying to pitch the show to a BBC executive in the 1960s -- having already planned out ''everything'' that happens from that point on, totally unaware of how absurd it sounds when you realize much of it was WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants in RealLife. Just the description of all the different Doctors is ridiculous.
-->'''Mr Borusa''': --->'''Mr. Borusa:''' How long do you envisage the show running?
-->'''Sydney Newman''':
running?\\
'''Sydney Newman:'''
Um. Er... ''({{Beat}})'' ''[{{beat}}]'' Twenty-six years.
** At this point, there are some '''huge''' questions the fandom has by and large accepted will/can '''never''' be answered, despite occasional hints/teases in the new series. These include the identities and fates of family members of the Doctor (his first wife in particular) besides Susan Foreman, the ultimate fate of Susan herself, the reason he ran away from Gallifrey in the first place (he usually claims it's boredom, but [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent "Heaven Sent" Sent"]] has him saying it's [[spoiler: fear of...[[spoiler:fear of... what?]]), and his birth name.
name.
* ''Series/AmericanGothic1995'' has ''Series/TheILand'': It starts off as a number fairly standard survival mystery, but after several episodes of dangling plot threads, most of which can be attributed to it being ScrewedByTheNetwork and CutShort; the show never got to address whether Buck will ever be stopped, or whether Caleb will turn evil, or whose side Selena is not really on. But there were some real head-scratchers, such as whether Sutpen in "Damned If You Don't" is [[spoiler:really a ghost Buck summoned]], whether Buck [[spoiler:[[DrivenToSuicide drove his girlfriend to suicide]]]], doing anything, the characters start wandering off at random, conflicts are either not resolved or whether Selena would ever reconcile with her father -- just abandoned, and what happened to him culminating in multiple instances of DroppedABridgeOnHim. Even the first place. That last one is particularly distressing, as final reveal of [[spoiler:Chase really being an old woman who was brainwashed to think she was still the episode in question same age as when she was [[ExecutiveMeddling never aired]], so very few people even know it exists.
* ''Series/CoronetBlue'' was a 60s show about a guy with [[LaserGuidedAmnesia no memory]] except for the titular ArcWords. The show only ran for a single season,
locked up]] just seems mean-spirited after everything she's been through.
%%* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'', anyone? People
and they never got to resolve anything.whole worldlines are MIA.



* ''Franchise/KamenRider''
** ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto'' starts suffering from this around episode 30. The series already featured many Kamen Riders, with each their own plotline, but kept introducing new plot elements, rather than resolve existing ones. Some of these, like the Red Shoes system, weren't even referenced anymore after their first appearance. Near the end of the series, it felt like the writers finally realized how crowded the series was and suddenly killed off multiple characters to give their plotlines some solution.
** ''Series/KamenRiderGhost'' really does not know where it wanted to go after its first arc was completed. The first arc featured a GottaCatchThemAll plot, in which multiple parties were trying to unite the 15 Eyecons [[note]](Eyeball like devices which contain the spirit of a famous historical person)[[/note]] to receive a wish. [[TheHero Takeru/Kamen Rider Ghost]], being a ghost, was searching for these, in order to wish himself back to life. He has to do this within 99 days, otherwise he'll cease to exist. [[TheRival Makoto/Kamen Rider Specter]] wanted them to do the same to his sister and the villains were looking for them for...evil stuff. But after the first arc, everyone simply forgets about the Eyecons, followed by the introduction of many new plot elements, of which none received a satisfactory conclusion. Examples are: TheRival suddenly being plagued by clones, the BigBad trying to master a race of AI controlled beings known as the Ganmaizer and TheHero trying to befriend all the historical figures inside his Eyecons.
* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' had a huge number of bizarre twists and turns; some of them were designed to explain things, but as the show became more and more fantastic, these became [[EpilepticTrees fewer and crazier]]. By the finale, there were -- to quote ''Website/CollegeHumor'' -- some [[http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1936291 teeny-tiny loose ends yet to be tied up]].
* ''Series/{{Merlin 2008}}'' is headed this way, though only time will tell if the writers can resolve everything they've raised thus far.
** This is especially true of the complex but still murky BackStory of Camelot's first generation, namely what the heck went down between Uther, Igraine, Nimueh, and Gaius when Arthur was conceived. Apparently Uther approached Nimueh (brought to the court by Gaius) to cast a spell to help his wife Igraine conceive, resulting in her death, Nimueh's banishment, and Uther's crusade against magical creatures. Every character who lived through those events tells a slightly different version of what really happened, but whether this is a variation of TheRashomon, or whether there's something more that the writers haven't told us yet, remains to be seen.
** There are also plenty of unanswered questions about the Druids (especially Mordred) and how much they know about Merlin (who they call "Emrys") and what they expect from his destiny.
* Season 2 of ''Series/{{Revenge}}'' quickly devolved into an incomprehensible mess involving a NebulousEvilOrganization whose ultimate goals were never clear, nor exactly how much or little they were involved in the various plot points going on. Notably, this actually led to the show's creator being fired, and season 3 starts with a mass burning of the whole thing, abruptly revealing that the entire group had been arrested between seasons.



* The people behind the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' were always fairly open that 75% of the show was being made up as they went along, leading to a fair amount of Kudzu by the end. The writers made a valiant attempt to wrap everything up, but plenty of mysteries were just dealt with by using a blatant InfoDump and a HandWave saying [[spoiler:it was [[AWizardDidIt God's will]].]]
%%
%%* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'', anyone? People and whole worldlines are MIA.
%%

to:

* The people behind the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' were always fairly open that 75% of the show was being made ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' unfortunately ended up as they went along, leading to with a fair amount of Kudzu by the end. The writers made Plot, likely a valiant attempt result of minimal planning and continuity changes over time. Unanswered questions include [[spoiler:whether or not Sam really was corrupted when brought back to wrap everything up, but plenty life as Azazel said and why all of mysteries Mary's friends and acquaintances were just dealt with killed off, which wasn't justified by using a blatant InfoDump and a HandWave saying [[spoiler:it was [[AWizardDidIt God's will]].]]
%%
%%* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'', anyone? People and whole worldlines are MIA.
%%
her eventual backstory.]]



* ''Series/TheFortyFourHundred'' did this. Probably intentionally, as with an ensemble cast you never know which plot hooks you'll have the opportunity to follow up next. It did get pretty annoying, though, when the biggest teaser at the end of season 2 didn't show up until halfway through season 3.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' unfortunately ended up with a Kudzu Plot, likely a result of minimal planning and continuity changes over time. Unanswered questions include [[spoiler:whether or not Sam really was corrupted when brought back to life as Azazel said and why all of Mary's friends and acquaintances were killed off, which wasn't justified by her eventual backstory.]]
* ''Series/{{Merlin 2008}}'' is headed this way, though only time will tell if the writers can resolve everything they've raised thus far.
** This is especially true of the complex but still murky BackStory of Camelot's first generation, namely what the heck went down between Uther, Igraine, Nimueh, and Gaius when Arthur was conceived. Apparently Uther approached Nimueh (brought to the court by Gaius) to cast a spell to help his wife Igraine conceive, resulting in her death, Nimueh's banishment, and Uther's crusade against magical creatures. Every character who lived through those events tells a slightly different version of what really happened, but whether this is a variation of TheRashomon, or whether there's something more that the writers haven't told us yet, remains to be seen.
** There are also plenty of unanswered questions about the Druids (especially Mordred) and how much they know about Merlin (who they call "Emrys") and what they expect from his destiny.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' was tightly plotted from the beginning and manages to maintain a tight story throughout. Unfortunately, numerous plot threads from early in the series had to be quietly dropped when the plot had to be modified to account for cast changes. Among the casualties: The data recording Kosh made of Talia Winter's fears, Captain Sheridan's knowledge of secret societies and black projects and Catherine Sakai's growing involvement with shady mega-corp exploitation of dead worlds - although the last one was resolved in one of the tie-in novels.
* The ill-fated TV adaptation of ''Series/{{Animorphs}}'' was forced to condense an entire season's worth of plots into a 90-minute three-part episode. The result, while superior to anything else the second season produced, is deeply confusing and disjointed, and the episode (and series) ends with many of these plots still unresolved.
* Season 2 of ''Series/{{Revenge}}'' quickly devolved into an incomprehensible mess involving a NebulousEvilOrganization whose ultimate goals were never clear, nor exactly how much or little they were involved in the various plot points going on. Notably, this actually led to the show's creator being fired, and season 3 starts with a mass burning of the whole thing, abruptly revealing that the entire group had been arrested between seasons.
* ''Franchise/KamenRider''
** ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto'' starts suffering from this around episode 30. The series already featured many Kamen Riders, with each their own plotline, but kept introducing new plot elements, rather than resolve existing ones. Some of these, like the Red Shoes system, weren't even referenced anymore after their first appearance. Near the end of the series, it felt like the writers finally realized how crowded the series was and suddenly killed off multiple characters to give their plotlines some solution.
** ''Series/KamenRiderGhost'' really does not know where it wanted to go after its first arc was completed. The first arc featured a GottaCatchThemAll plot, in which multiple parties were trying to unite the 15 Eyecons [[note]](Eyeball like devices which contain the spirit of a famous historical person)[[/note]] to receive a wish. [[TheHero Takeru/Kamen Rider Ghost]], being a ghost, was searching for these, in order to wish himself back to life. He has to do this within 99 days, otherwise he'll cease to exist. [[TheRival Makoto/Kamen Rider Specter]] wanted them to do the same to his sister and the villains were looking for them for...evil stuff. But after the first arc, everyone simply forgets about the Eyecons, followed by the introduction of many new plot elements, of which none received a satisfactory conclusion. Examples are: TheRival suddenly being plagued by clones, the BigBad trying to master a race of AI controlled beings known as the Ganmaizer and TheHero trying to befriend all the historical figures inside his Eyecons.
* ''Series/TheILand'': It starts off as a fairly standard survival mystery, but after several episodes of not really doing anything, the characters start wandering off at random, conflicts are either not resolved or just abandoned, and culminating in multiple instances of DroppedABridgeOnHim. Even the final reveal of [[spoiler:Chase really being an old woman who was brainwashed to think she was still the same age as when she was locked up]] just seems mean-spirited after everything she's been through.



* '' WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'' delved into this in its third season. Presumably, the planned fourth season would have tied up at least some of the loose ends, but the show got canceled before that could happen, meaning the third season finishes out with many plot points unresolved. Designs for the fourth season have been released, though, [[AllThereInTheManual in the ''Allspark Almanac'']] and at conventions, which answer some (but not all) of the remaining questions.


Added DiffLines:

* '' WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'' delved into this in its third season. Presumably, the planned fourth season would have tied up at least some of the loose ends, but the show got canceled before that could happen, meaning the third season finishes out with many plot points unresolved. Designs for the fourth season have been released, though, [[AllThereInTheManual in the ''Allspark Almanac'']] and at conventions, which answer some (but not all) of the remaining questions.

Added DiffLines:

* Admirably [[DownplayedTrope Downplayed]] in ''Literature/TheLicaniusTrilogy''. Despite introducing time travel, multiple POV threads across different time periods and alternate dimensions, the story never sprawls out of control and almost everything is neatly wrapped up with solid answers by the story's end.


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, [[Deuteragonist William Turner]] wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones]], while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death]] and settle down into a normal life with Will. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A not insignificant amount of the second film's running time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]]]] and thus set up a cliffhanger between the two films, and as if all of that weren't bad enough, nearly an ''hour'' of screen time is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no narrative or thematic reason other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, [[Deuteragonist {{Deuteragonist}} William Turner]] Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones]], while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death]] and settle down into a normal life with Will. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while NominalHero Jack Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A not insignificant amount of the second film's running time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart]]]] and thus set up a cliffhanger between the two films, and as if all of that weren't bad enough, nearly an ''hour'' of screen time is devoted to the pirates' agreeing pirates deciding to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no narrative or thematic reason other reason than to have a [[spoiler: [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].altogether]] (or simply ignored the plot and [[JustHereForGodzilla only stuck around for the humour and action sequences]]).


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist William Turner}} wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones]], while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death]] and settle down into a normal life with Will. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while {{NominalHero Jack Sparrow}} seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A not insignificant amount of the second film's running time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal {{MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart}}]] and thus set up a cliffhanger between the two films, and as if all of that weren't bad enough, nearly an ''hour'' of screen time is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no narrative or thematic reason other reason than to have a [[spoiler: BattleInTheRain maelstrom]] take place during the climactic battle sequence]]. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, {{Deuteragonist [[Deuteragonist William Turner}} Turner]] wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor, Davy Jones]], while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death]] and settle down into a normal life with Will. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them, while {{NominalHero NominalHero Jack Sparrow}} Sparrow seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A not insignificant amount of the second film's running time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal {{MacGuffin [[MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart}}]] heart]]]] and thus set up a cliffhanger between the two films, and as if all of that weren't bad enough, nearly an ''hour'' of screen time is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no narrative or thematic reason other reason than to have a [[spoiler: BattleInTheRain maelstrom]] [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom]]]] take place during the climactic battle sequence]].sequence. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, Will Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor]], while BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Meanwhile, Jack seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at seemingly no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal Davy Jones' heart and thus set up a cliffhanger between the two films]], and as if all of that weren't bad enough, yet ''another'' subplot is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom take place during the climactic battle sequence]]. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, Will Turner {{Deuteragonist William Turner}} wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor]], captor, Davy Jones]], while heroine Elizabeth Swann seeks to [[spoiler: avenge her father's death]] and settle down into a normal life with Will. The BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Meanwhile, them, while {{NominalHero Jack Sparrow}} seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. A not insignificant amount of the second film's running time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is then devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at seemingly essentially no consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal {{MacGuffin Davy Jones' heart heart}}]] and thus set up a cliffhanger between the two films]], films, and as if all of that weren't bad enough, yet ''another'' subplot nearly an ''hour'' of screen time is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no narrative or thematic reason other reason than to have a [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom [[spoiler: BattleInTheRain maelstrom]] take place during the climactic battle sequence]]. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].

Added DiffLines:

* {{Zigzagged}} with ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'': despite its nature as a MassivelyMultiplayerCrossover, self-contained installments avert this since most of its {{Crossover}} plot elements are either resolved by the climax or AdaptedOut from the start to avoid it entirely. {{Continuit|y}}ies like the "Classic Timeline" and ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsAlpha'' sagas will leave dangling plot threads, but are also resolved either off-screen or often through WordOfGod (even though some explanations can be flimsy). However, the ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsZ'' saga became a victim of this due a combination of MergedReality (think of the end of ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths'', but kickstarted by the events from ''Anime/SuperDimensionCenturyOrguss'') and its overall MythArc becoming something else entirely (rather than an overarching EldritchAbomination, it became deliberate misinformation by TheManBehindTheMan).


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Meanwhile, Jack seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the East India Trading Company, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at seemingly no consequence]], and as if all of that weren't bad enough, yet ''another'' subplot is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom take place during the climactic battle sequence]]. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. To boot, Will Turner wants to [[spoiler: rescue his father from ''The Flying Dutchman'' by obtaining the key to the titular dead man's chest and killing his father's captor]], while BigBad, Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Company seeks to rule over the seven seas by exterminating the various pirate factions that occupy them. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Meanwhile, Jack seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)]]. Nearly half-an-hour of the third film is devoted to the protagonists' efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the East India Trading Company, British Empire, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking James Norrington is also shoehorned into the story at seemingly no consequence]], consequence other than to [[spoiler: steal Davy Jones' heart and thus set up a cliffhanger between the two films]], and as if all of that weren't bad enough, yet ''another'' subplot is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom take place during the climactic battle sequence]]. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Meanwhile, Jack seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler]]become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)[[/spoiler]]. Nearly half-an-hour to an hour of the third film is devoted to the protagonists' quest to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their efforts to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler]]him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain[[/spoiler]]. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the plot only for [[spoiler]]him to die at seemingly no consequence[[/spoiler]], and is if all of that weren't bad enough, yet ''another'' subplot is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to release a sea goddess from her human confines for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom take place during the climactic battle sequence]]. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and story threads altogether]].

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. Meanwhile, Jack seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler]]become [[spoiler: become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)[[/spoiler]]. seas)]]. Nearly half-an-hour to an hour of the third film is devoted to the protagonists' quest efforts to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their efforts quest to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler]]him [[spoiler: him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain[[/spoiler]]. captain]]. The latter-most of these ties into the broader, overarching plot which sees many diverse factions of pirates reluctantly banding together so that they can fend off the East India Trading Company, which also involves a lot of blackmailing and lengthy negotiations between each of the parties involved. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking James Norrington is also shoehorned into the plot only for [[spoiler]]him to die story at seemingly no consequence[[/spoiler]], consequence]], and is as if all of that weren't bad enough, yet ''another'' subplot is devoted to the pirates' agreeing to [[spoiler: release a sea goddess from her human confines confines]] for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom take place during the climactic battle sequence]]. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and individual story threads altogether]].
altogether]].


* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, betray one of their allies, or compromise with one of their adversaries. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. An entire subplot is devoted to releasing a sea goddess from her human confines for seemingly no other reason than to have a maelstrom take place during the climactic battle sequence. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already given up on trying to follow the story altogether]].

to:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' in particular, are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder betray one of their allies, allies]], or compromise with one of their adversaries. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. An Meanwhile, Jack seems to be juggling ''three separate albeit interconnected agendas at once''--get Cutler Beckett off his back, settle his debt with Davy Jones, and [[spoiler]]become immortal (the latter of which might even involve killing Jones and taking his place as ruler of the high seas)[[/spoiler]]. Nearly half-an-hour to an hour of the third film is devoted to the protagonists' quest to rescue Jack from limbo, while an entire subplot revolves around their efforts to recruit an esteemed pirate lord, only for [[spoiler]]him to be killed off so that Elizabeth can take his place as captain[[/spoiler]]. James Norrington is also shoehorned into the plot only for [[spoiler]]him to die at seemingly no consequence[[/spoiler]], and is if all of that weren't bad enough, yet ''another'' subplot is devoted to releasing the pirates' agreeing to release a sea goddess from her human confines for seemingly no other reason than to have a [[BattleInTheRain maelstrom take place during the climactic battle sequence. sequence]]. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already long given up on trying to follow the characters and story threads altogether]].

Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' and its sequel, ''[[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd At World's End]]'' are infamous for this. In addition to both films being over two and a half hours long, almost every one of the seven or so main characters has their own goal or agenda which they are working towards, resulting in many circumstances wherein which they either revise said agenda, betray one of their allies, or compromise with one of their adversaries. A not insignificant amount of time is devoted to the LoveTriangle between Jack, Will, and Elizabeth that [[RomanticPlotTumor feels completely unnecessary]] after the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl first film]] already made it perfectly clear that Will and Elizabeth were the OfficialCouple. An entire subplot is devoted to releasing a sea goddess from her human confines for seemingly no other reason than to have a maelstrom take place during the climactic battle sequence. Needless to say, many if not most viewers were left thoroughly exhausted by the end of it all, while others [[EightDeadlyWords had already given up on trying to follow the story altogether]].

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