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* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' dabbles in this from time to time. For example, in ''Discworld/TheTruth'', it's explained that the dried frog pills the Bursar takes to keep him apparently sane are actually hallucinogens, the idea being that a proper dose will cause him to hallucinate that he's sane (just like most people).
** In ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'', when Hex (a non-electronic computer composed primarily of ants marching through glass tubes) becomes unstable, its rationality is restored by ''typing the words'' "dried frog pills" into it. (This may have been inspired by the [[http://www.multicians.org/cookie.html Cookie Monster virus]], one of the first computer viruses.)
** ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' introduces the concept of L-Space, where large collections of books warp time and space based on the principle that knowledge is power, power is energy, energy is matter, matter has mass, and mass warps space-time. Thus, the reason why owners of independent book stores tend to be so eccentric is that they're secretly from an alternate dimension (usually one where it's acceptable business practice to wear carpet slippers all day and only open the shop when you feel like it).
** Then there's the time in ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'' the characters travel across the sea in a magic lantern. This works because one of them is holding the lantern, and they're all inside the lantern. The trick is to complete the journey before the universe catches on... oops, too late.
** In a footnote in ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'', there's a passage regarding the philosopher Ly Tin Weedle's theory of kingons (or queons), the elemental particle of monarchy, that he believed traveled faster than light; there could only be one king at a time and there couldn't be a gap between kings, so monarchy must travel faster than anything else in the universe. His plans to use this discovery to send messages by carefully torturing a small king to modulate the signal never came to fruition because at that moment the bar closed.

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* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' dabbles in this from time to time. For example, in ''Discworld/TheTruth'', ''Literature/TheTruth'', it's explained that the dried frog pills the Bursar takes to keep him apparently sane are actually hallucinogens, the idea being that a proper dose will cause him to hallucinate that he's sane (just like most people).
** In ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'', ''Literature/{{Hogfather}}'', when Hex (a non-electronic computer composed primarily of ants marching through glass tubes) becomes unstable, its rationality is restored by ''typing the words'' "dried frog pills" into it. (This may have been inspired by the [[http://www.multicians.org/cookie.html Cookie Monster virus]], one of the first computer viruses.)
** ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' ''Literature/GuardsGuards'' introduces the concept of L-Space, where large collections of books warp time and space based on the principle that knowledge is power, power is energy, energy is matter, matter has mass, and mass warps space-time. Thus, the reason why owners of independent book stores tend to be so eccentric is that they're secretly from an alternate dimension (usually one where it's acceptable business practice to wear carpet slippers all day and only open the shop when you feel like it).
** Then there's the time in ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'' ''Literature/{{Sourcery}}'' the characters travel across the sea in a magic lantern. This works because one of them is holding the lantern, and they're all inside the lantern. The trick is to complete the journey before the universe catches on... oops, too late.
** In a footnote in ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'', ''Literature/{{Mort}}'', there's a passage regarding the philosopher Ly Tin Weedle's theory of kingons (or queons), the elemental particle of monarchy, that he believed traveled faster than light; there could only be one king at a time and there couldn't be a gap between kings, so monarchy must travel faster than anything else in the universe. His plans to use this discovery to send messages by carefully torturing a small king to modulate the signal never came to fruition because at that moment the bar closed.


** John Rogers, one of the film's writers, is a physics major. The writers were entirely aware that what they were proposing was ludicrously incorrect, but deliberately patterned ''The Core'' in the style of a 60's Science Hero movie; it's not realism that's important, it's verisimilitude. It's also worth mentioning that the craft was originally written to have a windshield, and that there were ''dinosaurs'' in one of the earlier scripts[[note]]A ShoutOut to ''Journey To The Center Of the Earth'', which posited that there was a prehistoric landscape inside the Earth's center.[[/note]]

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** John Rogers, one of the film's writers, is a physics major. The writers were entirely aware that what they were proposing was ludicrously incorrect, but deliberately patterned ''The Core'' in the style of a 60's Science Hero movie; it's not realism that's important, it's verisimilitude. It's also worth mentioning that the craft was originally written to have a windshield, and that there were ''dinosaurs'' in one of the earlier scripts[[note]]A scripts.[[note]]A ShoutOut to ''Journey To The Center Of the Earth'', which posited that there was a prehistoric landscape inside the Earth's center.[[/note]]

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** The Tie-in comics inform us that the surest way to get the Demoman "drunk" and useless is to feed him solid food and water. His body has been spending so much time "wrestling nutrients out of grain alcohol and aspirin tablets" that it starts acting funny because it thinks it's been poisoned.
*** The Medic later [[spoiler: revives the entire team, who had been drained of ''all of their blood'' by robots, simply by "putting the blood back in" after soaking it up from the ground]].
*** And the only one who's still able to fight during that time is the Demoman, whose blood instantly gave the ''robots'' alcohol poisoning. How is it possible, given that he hasn't been given a drop for 24 hours ? His body simply adapted to turn his stomach into a distillery.

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* The manual of ''VideoGame/ThreeDirtyDwarves'' has a treatise from a scientist explaining how the titular dwarves (who are tabletop RPG avatars brought into reality by their RealityWarper creators) managed to enter our world. It starts with the premise that the non-existent nature of the dwarve's home dimension makes dimension-hopping ''easier'' (as "the rules of physics don't apply) and piles on the nonsensoleum from there.


* While not SciFi, ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' is openly plot-based. The characters are [[GenreSavvy aware]] and use it for everything from fastforwarding in time to realizing what's about to happen.

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* While not SciFi, ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' is openly plot-based.[[NarrativeCausality plot-based]]. The characters are [[GenreSavvy aware]] and use it for everything from fastforwarding in time to realizing what's about to happen.

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** {{Subverted}} in "Anima -- Revelation":
--> '''Daebo''': Daebo wonders what's wrong with sticky Kiki!
--> '''Riff''': I surmise the sugar from the marshmallow-fluff Kiki ate sent her into a vibrating phase-state where her molecules fused with the marshmallocules, altering her DNA and making her permanently sticky forever. Or she just needs a bath.


%%* James Blaylock used the same premise in ''Land of Dreams'', mostly as an excuse to include time travelers' giant shoes and spectacles in his novel alongside little men disguised as mice.

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%%* James Blaylock Creator/JamesPBlaylock used the same premise in ''Land of Dreams'', mostly as an excuse to include time travelers' giant shoes and spectacles in his novel alongside little men disguised as mice.

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* In ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' every human is essentially unaware that they are a Reality-Warping God, and mages are beginning to awaken to the truth, but most need their Focus to actually employ their powers, as they [[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve believe that whatever method they practice is actually responsible for the changes they employ]], whether they use druidic magic, mad science, martial arts or reality hacking. The more they raise their Arete the more they realize that the magic is in them rather than their tools. [[AvertedTrope Averted]] with the Technocrats, as their Enlightenment further cements their belief that their technology is the source of the fantastic abilities, and even when a Technocrat Ascends, they basically become a Ghost in the Machine.


** One can elaborate this this idea by using a very expensive oriental rug, on the theory that the chance of the toast landing butter side down is directly proportional [[FinaglesLaw to the expense of the surface it's dropped over]]. Additionally, attaching two cats back to back to a driveshaft that falls freely and dropping the entire assembly should result in it spinning in midair indefinitely. Hooking this up to a generator would make The Bi-feline Dynamo.

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** One can elaborate this on this idea by using a very expensive oriental rug, on the theory that the chance of the toast landing butter side down is directly proportional [[FinaglesLaw to the expense of the surface it's dropped over]]. Additionally, attaching two cats back to back to a driveshaft that falls freely and dropping the entire assembly should result in it spinning in midair indefinitely. Hooking this up to a generator would make The Bi-feline Dynamo.


** The previous mode of locomotion, the Starslip Drive, worked by inputting the destination and flipping you into an alternate universe where you were already there. [[spoiler: This causes some CerebusSyndrome moments when the Main character wind up in an alternate universe where another main character never existed.]]

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** The previous mode of locomotion, the Starslip Drive, worked by inputting the destination and flipping you into an alternate universe where you were already there. [[spoiler: This causes some CerebusSyndrome moments when the Main character main characters wind up in an alternate universe where another main character never existed.]]


** ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' introduces the concept of L-Space, where large collections of books warp time and space based on the principle that knowledge is power, power is energy, energy is matter, matter has mass, and mass warps space-time. Thus, the reason why owners of independent book stores tend to be so eccentric is that they're from an alternate dimension.

to:

** ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' introduces the concept of L-Space, where large collections of books warp time and space based on the principle that knowledge is power, power is energy, energy is matter, matter has mass, and mass warps space-time. Thus, the reason why owners of independent book stores tend to be so eccentric is that they're secretly from an alternate dimension.dimension (usually one where it's acceptable business practice to wear carpet slippers all day and only open the shop when you feel like it).


* ''{{ComicStrip/Foxtrot}}'': One strip has Paige intently watching a pot on the range. Peter asks her what she's doing, and she says she's watching the pot to ensure it doesn't boil, so whatever foul concoction their CordonBleugh of a mother put in won't end up as dinner. Peter laughs, then learns there's twice the usual amount, and joins her.

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* ''{{ComicStrip/Foxtrot}}'': One strip has Paige intently watching a pot on the range. Peter asks her what she's doing, and she says she's watching the pot to ensure it doesn't boil, so whatever foul concoction their CordonBleugh CordonBleughChef of a mother put in won't end up as dinner. Peter laughs, then learns there's twice the usual amount, and joins her.


* Much of Professor Farnsworth's science in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' is based on total nonsense. For instance, his theory of "reverse fossilisation" -- that if fossilization turns organic matter to minerals, then one simply had to reverse the process to turn household appliances into animals. He also built a spaceship which moved by staying perfectly still by shifting the rest of the universe, whose engine's afterburners worked at two hundred percent efficiency. Ships can cross the universe in days even though you can't travel faster than the speed of light because the speed of light was increased six hundred years ago.

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* Much of Professor Farnsworth's science in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' is based on total nonsense. For instance, his theory of "reverse fossilisation" fossilization" -- that if fossilization turns organic matter to minerals, then one simply had to reverse the process to turn household appliances into animals. He also built a spaceship which moved by staying perfectly still by shifting the rest of the universe, whose engine's afterburners worked at two hundred percent efficiency. Ships can cross the universe in days even though you can't travel faster than the speed of light because the speed of light was increased six hundred years ago.


[[folder:Folklore]]
* In one Myth/PaulBunyan story, he builds a sawmill that, simply by being set in reverse, can convert sawdust back into whole logs.
[[/folder]]



* The ''Literature/ThursdayNext'' novel ''Lost in a Good Book'' features Nextian Geometry, which (for example) uses the "principle" that cylindrical objects such as cakes and scones look rectangular from the side, as the basis for a design of cookie cutter which doesn't leave those irregular bits of leftover dough. But only if the cutter is used with Nextian dough, which tastes like library paste.
** ''First Among Sequels'' later reveals that the Chrono Guard can time-travel because of the reasoning that, in all the entire history of the universe, someone must have invented time machines. However, when they finally trace the future history of the universe to the end and find out that no one ever did, [[PuffOfLogic all their time machines vanish]].
*** The method by which they hope time travel will be invented: A recipe for ''unscrambled eggs''.[[note]]That is to say, eggs that ''were'' scrambled but now aren't.[[/note]]
* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' runs on a combination of this and InsaneTrollLogic.
** The Infinite Improbability Drive, which, in a nutshell, [[ShapedLikeItself works against all probability precisely because someone went through the trouble of calculating precisely how improbable it is for it to work]].
** And the Infinite Improbability Drive's invention also used Nonsensoleum. They already had a Finite Improbability Generator, but needed an Infinite one to take in the whole universe for use as a drive, and frustrated scientists declared this "virtually impossible" - it took one of the lab cleaners to figure out that a "virtual impossibility" is also a "finite improbability", so he could use the Finite Improbability Generator to create the Infinite Improbability Drive [[spoiler:or, in fact, teleport its core component, the Heart of Gold/Golden Bail, there from where it had been hidden from the Krikketers]]. Furthermore, the Finite Improbability Generator is powered by a "fresh cup of really hot tea", as it runs on the unpredictability of the Brownian motion of the water molecules. [[note]]The cleaner who did this was given the Galactic Institute's Prize For Extreme Cleverness, and then was promptly murdered by a rampaging mob of respectable scientists who finally decided the one thing they couldn't stand was a smart-ass.[[/note]]
** In ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything'', a new form of travel is devised based on "Bistromathics", the unnatural manner in which numbers behave when calculated on Italian restaurant bills.
** ''Life'' also introduces the "[[WeirdnessCensor Somebody Else's Problem Field]]", a cloaking device that takes advantage of people's natural tendency to [[WeirdnessCensor ignore things they can't comprehend or don't want to deal with]], and proposes that the secret to unassisted human flight is to throw yourself at the ground and miss. Which, while a gross over-simplification, is [[GeniusBonus sort of how things maintain orbits...]] so it's not entirely false. [[spoiler:It works, too.]]
** There's also the drive that functions on the principle that bad news always reaches places before anything else. Too bad nobody would allow it to dock.
** If you've done [[Literature/AliceInWonderland six impossible things this morning]], why not round it off with breakfast at Milliways - Restaurant at the End of the Universe. Don't worry about booking a table or forgetting your wallet; since this resturant is at the ''temporal'' end of the universe, rather than the spatial, you've had literally all of time in existence to book your seats and the food you had when you last visited the place, which you've obviously already done by the time you get to the place, even if you haven't done so from ''your'' perspective yet.
** ''Literature/TheRestaurantAtTheEndOfTheUniverse'' also has an ''accidental'' application of nonsensoleum, when a rock band using cutting-edge high-tech amplifiers achieves such loud volumes that the ''tectonic plate'' on which the concert is taking place flips like a flapjack, converting a former blasted wasteland into a fertile field of volcanic soil which becomes the garden spot of that world in just a few short years. It also somehow cured the natives of their unwanted psychic powers, which were forced on the populace by the rest of the galaxy for being quiet and happy while the everyone else was miserable from the small talk they were forced into by social convention. The concert was to distract them from the constant buzz of other people's thoughts.
---> "It was a good gig," a spokesman for the band commented.

to:

* The ''Literature/ThursdayNext'' novel ''Lost in a Good Book'' features Nextian Geometry, which (for example) uses Creator/StanislawLem has sci-fi stories set after the "principle" that cylindrical objects such as cakes and scones look rectangular from the side, as the basis for a design of cookie cutter which doesn't leave those irregular bits of leftover dough. But only if the cutter is used with Nextian dough, which tastes like library paste.
** ''First Among Sequels'' later reveals that the Chrono Guard can time-travel because
Discovery of the reasoning that, in all the entire history Energetic Potential of the universe, someone must have invented time machines. However, when they finally trace the future history of the universe to the end and find out that no one ever did, [[PuffOfLogic all their time machines vanish]].
*** The method by which they hope time travel will be invented: A recipe for ''unscrambled eggs''.[[note]]That is to say, eggs that ''were'' scrambled but now aren't.[[/note]]
* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' runs on a combination of this and InsaneTrollLogic.
** The Infinite Improbability Drive, which, in a nutshell, [[ShapedLikeItself works against all probability precisely because someone went through the trouble of calculating precisely how improbable it is for it to work]].
** And the Infinite Improbability Drive's invention also used Nonsensoleum. They already had a Finite Improbability Generator, but needed an Infinite one to take in the whole universe for use as a drive, and frustrated scientists declared this "virtually impossible" - it took one of the lab cleaners to figure out that a "virtual impossibility" is also a "finite improbability", so he could use the Finite Improbability Generator to create the Infinite Improbability Drive [[spoiler:or, in fact, teleport its core component, the Heart of Gold/Golden Bail, there from where it had been hidden from the Krikketers]]. Furthermore, the Finite Improbability Generator is powered by a "fresh cup of really hot tea", as it runs on the unpredictability of the Brownian motion of the water molecules. [[note]]The cleaner who did this was given the Galactic Institute's Prize For Extreme Cleverness, and then was promptly murdered by a rampaging mob of respectable scientists who finally decided the one thing they couldn't stand was a smart-ass.[[/note]]
** In ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything'', a new form of travel is devised based on "Bistromathics", the unnatural manner in which numbers behave when calculated on Italian restaurant bills.
** ''Life'' also introduces the "[[WeirdnessCensor Somebody Else's Problem Field]]", a cloaking device that takes advantage of people's natural tendency to [[WeirdnessCensor ignore things they can't comprehend or don't want to deal with]], and proposes that the secret to unassisted human flight is to throw yourself at the ground and miss. Which, while a gross over-simplification, is [[GeniusBonus sort of how things maintain orbits...]] so it's not entirely false. [[spoiler:It works, too.]]
** There's also the drive that functions on the principle that bad news always reaches places before anything else. Too bad nobody would allow it to dock.
** If you've done [[Literature/AliceInWonderland six impossible things this morning]], why not round it off with breakfast at Milliways - Restaurant at the End of the Universe. Don't worry about booking a table or forgetting your wallet; since this resturant is at the ''temporal'' end of the universe, rather than the spatial, you've had literally all of time in existence to book your seats and the food you had when you last visited the place, which you've obviously already done by the time you get to the place, even if you haven't done so from ''your'' perspective yet.
** ''Literature/TheRestaurantAtTheEndOfTheUniverse'' also has an ''accidental'' application of nonsensoleum, when a rock band using cutting-edge high-tech amplifiers achieves such loud volumes that the ''tectonic plate'' on which the concert is taking place flips like a flapjack, converting a former blasted wasteland into a fertile field of volcanic soil which becomes the garden spot of that world in just a few short years. It also somehow cured the natives of their unwanted psychic powers, which were forced on the populace by the rest of the galaxy for being quiet and happy while the everyone else was miserable from the small talk they were forced into by social convention. The concert was to distract them from the constant buzz of other people's thoughts.
---> "It was a good gig," a spokesman for the band commented.
Lemon Juice.
----



* The novel ''TheHolyLand'' claims that extraterrestrials are taller because of relativity. They've been flying in spaceships for generations, and since everything in the universe is shrinking (the ''real'' reason for the redshift), the time dilation means that they've shrunken less.
** James Blaylock used the same premise in ''Land Of Dreams'', mostly as an excuse to include time travelers' giant shoes and spectacles in his novel alongside little men disguised as mice.
* This was the WordOfGod explanation (and heavily implied in the stories -- although so much of history was lost to the characters that ''they'' never figured it out, there are clues for the reader that this is what is going on) for why TimeTravel took the main character to a fantastic version of the past in Creator/LarryNiven's Svetz short stories -- which would eventually lead to ''Literature/RainbowMars''. They had managed to invent Time Travel... but since Time Travel was impossible and could only work in fiction, it took them to a fictionalized version of the past. Hence Svetz bringing back Moby Dick -- complete with a dead Ahab -- when he was sent to find a whale, after a close brush with the Leviathan.
* In one Myth/PaulBunyan story, he builds a sawmill that, simply by being set in reverse, can convert sawdust back into whole logs.
* Although it's half-TechnoBabble, half-MagiBabble, there has to be space here for Creator/RobertRankin's ''Raiders of the Lost Car Park''. The explanation for where TheFairFolk are hiding, which would boggle [[Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy Ford Prefect]]: if you've ever tried to glue a rectangular map onto a globe of the same scale, you'll find it doesn't fit properly. The bits of the map that don't fit onto the globe are the regions in which they hide out. These are only accessible to humans by playing certain notes on an ocarina that has been reinvented with a power drill. And that's the part that, comparatively speaking, ''makes sense''.
** ''Knees Up Mother Earth'' features a motor vehicle fuelled by the ''rage' of its driver. Via a helmet built from Meccano.
* In ''Literature/TallTaleAmerica'' the chapter on Jim Bridger and FeboldFeboldson ("Western Scientists") is all about this. Petrified forests having petrified gravity, feeding fish iron rich food so you could harvest them with a magnet, literally cutting fog with a knife and burying it under ground; they've got it all.
** The second chapter about Myth/PaulBunyan, the one where he's a "scientific industrialist," has got some whoppers, too. He invents refrigerator cars when he packs some cows in with a bunch of popcorn; the cows think the popcorn's snow and freeze solid on the spot. Then there's how he finds oil wells by following dinosaur footprints, or how he carves one large hole into pieces to sell as small, individual holes for fence posts.
* Creator/RobertAHeinlein's tongue-in-cheek novel ''Literature/TheNumberOfTheBeast'' features, among other things, a dimensional transference drive that works by gyroscopic precession. Specifically, precession applied to a gyroscope in such a way as to make it do something geometrically impossible. Instead, it takes itself and anything touching it into in another universe.
* Creator/StanislawLem has sci-fi stories set after the Discovery of the Energetic Potential of Lemon Juice.



* In the ''Literature/{{Wildcards}}'' books, some Aces are super inventors, but other scientists/engineers can't operate or maintain their devices because it's their own psychic power that makes them work.



* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' runs on a combination of this and InsaneTrollLogic.
** The Infinite Improbability Drive, which, in a nutshell, [[ShapedLikeItself works against all probability precisely because someone went through the trouble of calculating precisely how improbable it is for it to work]].
** And the Infinite Improbability Drive's invention also used Nonsensoleum. They already had a Finite Improbability Generator, but needed an Infinite one to take in the whole universe for use as a drive, and frustrated scientists declared this "virtually impossible" - it took one of the lab cleaners to figure out that a "virtual impossibility" is also a "finite improbability", so he could use the Finite Improbability Generator to create the Infinite Improbability Drive [[spoiler:or, in fact, teleport its core component, the Heart of Gold/Golden Bail, there from where it had been hidden from the Krikketers]]. Furthermore, the Finite Improbability Generator is powered by a "fresh cup of really hot tea", as it runs on the unpredictability of the Brownian motion of the water molecules. [[note]]The cleaner who did this was given the Galactic Institute's Prize For Extreme Cleverness, and then was promptly murdered by a rampaging mob of respectable scientists who finally decided the one thing they couldn't stand was a smart-ass.[[/note]]
** In ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything'', a new form of travel is devised based on "Bistromathics", the unnatural manner in which numbers behave when calculated on Italian restaurant bills.
** ''Life'' also introduces the "[[WeirdnessCensor Somebody Else's Problem Field]]", a cloaking device that takes advantage of people's natural tendency to [[WeirdnessCensor ignore things they can't comprehend or don't want to deal with]], and proposes that the secret to unassisted human flight is to throw yourself at the ground and miss. Which, while a gross over-simplification, is [[GeniusBonus sort of how things maintain orbits...]] so it's not entirely false. [[spoiler:It works, too.]]
** There's also the drive that functions on the principle that bad news always reaches places before anything else. Too bad nobody would allow it to dock.
** If you've done [[Literature/AliceInWonderland six impossible things this morning]], why not round it off with breakfast at Milliways - Restaurant at the End of the Universe. Don't worry about booking a table or forgetting your wallet; since this resturant is at the ''temporal'' end of the universe, rather than the spatial, you've had literally all of time in existence to book your seats and the food you had when you last visited the place, which you've obviously already done by the time you get to the place, even if you haven't done so from ''your'' perspective yet.
** ''Literature/TheRestaurantAtTheEndOfTheUniverse'' also has an ''accidental'' application of nonsensoleum, when a rock band using cutting-edge high-tech amplifiers achieves such loud volumes that the ''tectonic plate'' on which the concert is taking place flips like a flapjack, converting a former blasted wasteland into a fertile field of volcanic soil which becomes the garden spot of that world in just a few short years. It also somehow cured the natives of their unwanted psychic powers, which were forced on the populace by the rest of the galaxy for being quiet and happy while the everyone else was miserable from the small talk they were forced into by social convention. The concert was to distract them from the constant buzz of other people's thoughts.
---> "It was a good gig," a spokesman for the band commented.
* The novel ''Literature/TheHolyLand'' claims that extraterrestrials are taller because of relativity. They've been flying in spaceships for generations, and since everything in the universe is shrinking (the ''real'' reason for the redshift), the time dilation means that they've shrunken less.
%%* James Blaylock used the same premise in ''Land of Dreams'', mostly as an excuse to include time travelers' giant shoes and spectacles in his novel alongside little men disguised as mice.
* ''Literature/TheLongEarth'': Travel to parallel dimensions is achieved with a device that consists of a metal case, a few wires, and a potato. Although given that at least some people have the ability to "step" without them, it might be [[MagicFeather another trope entirely]].
* Creator/RobertAHeinlein's tongue-in-cheek novel ''Literature/TheNumberOfTheBeast'' features, among other things, a dimensional transference drive that works by gyroscopic precession. Specifically, precession applied to a gyroscope in such a way as to make it do something geometrically impossible. Instead, it takes itself and anything touching it into in another universe.



* ''Literature/TheLongEarth'': Travel to parallel dimensions is achieved with a device that consists of a metal case, a few wires, and a potato. Although given that at least some people have the ability to "step" without them it might be [[MagicFeather another trope entirely]].

to:

* ''Literature/TheLongEarth'': Travel to parallel dimensions is achieved with a device that consists of a metal case, a few wires, and a potato. Although given it's half-TechnoBabble, half-MagiBabble, there has to be space here for Creator/RobertRankin's ''Raiders of the Lost Car Park''. The explanation for where TheFairFolk are hiding, which would boggle [[Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy Ford Prefect]]: if you've ever tried to glue a rectangular map onto a globe of the same scale, you'll find it doesn't fit properly. The bits of the map that at least don't fit onto the globe are the regions in which they hide out. These are only accessible to humans by playing certain notes on an ocarina that has been reinvented with a power drill. And that's the part that, comparatively speaking, ''makes sense''.
** ''Knees Up Mother Earth'' features a motor vehicle fuelled by the ''rage' of its driver. Via a helmet built from Meccano.
* This was the WordOfGod explanation (and heavily implied in the stories -- although so much of history was lost to the characters that ''they'' never figured it out, there are clues for the reader that this is what is going on) for why TimeTravel took the main character to a fantastic version of the past in Creator/LarryNiven's Svetz short stories -- which would eventually lead to ''Literature/RainbowMars''. They had managed to invent Time Travel... but since Time Travel was impossible and could only work in fiction, it took them to a fictionalized version of the past. Hence Svetz bringing back Moby Dick -- complete with a dead Ahab -- when he was sent to find a whale, after a close brush with the Leviathan.
* In ''Literature/TallTaleAmerica'' the chapter on Jim Bridger and FeboldFeboldson ("Western Scientists") is all about this. Petrified forests having petrified gravity, feeding fish iron rich food so you could harvest them with a magnet, literally cutting fog with a knife and burying it under ground; they've got it all.
** The second chapter about Myth/PaulBunyan, the one where he's a "scientific industrialist", has got
some people whoppers, too. He invents refrigerator cars when he packs some cows in with a bunch of popcorn; the cows think the popcorn's snow and freeze solid on the spot. Then there's how he finds oil wells by following dinosaur footprints, or how he carves one large hole into pieces to sell as small, individual holes for fence posts.
* The ''Literature/ThursdayNext'' novel ''Lost in a Good Book'' features Nextian Geometry, which (for example) uses the "principle" that cylindrical objects such as cakes and scones look rectangular from the side, as the basis for a design of cookie cutter which doesn't leave those irregular bits of leftover dough. But only if the cutter is used with Nextian dough, which tastes like library paste.
** ''First Among Sequels'' later reveals that the Chrono Guard can time-travel because of the reasoning that, in all the entire history of the universe, someone must
have invented time machines. However, when they finally trace the ability future history of the universe to "step" without the end and find out that no one ever did, [[PuffOfLogic all their time machines vanish]].
*** The method by which they hope time travel will be invented: A recipe for ''unscrambled eggs''.[[note]]That is to say, eggs that ''were'' scrambled but now aren't.[[/note]]
* In the ''Literature/WildCards'' books, some Aces are super inventors, but other scientists/engineers can't operate or maintain their devices because it's their own psychic power that makes
them it might be [[MagicFeather another trope entirely]].work.



--->''[[LargeHam David Tennant]]: He's hyper-podulating! He's using his moluscian glang-valves to internally vibrolate our DNA!''

to:

--->''[[LargeHam --->'''[[LargeHam David Tennant]]: Tennant]]:''' He's hyper-podulating! He's using his moluscian glang-valves to internally vibrolate our DNA!''DNA!

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