Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / InternalRetcon

Go To



* A story in ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' deals with a child growing up in the Zirr Empire, an alien regime that keeps getting into conflict with the [[TheFantasticFaux First Family]], a superhero team. The Family are constantly framed as aggressors standing in the way of galactic peace, who have been trounced by the Zirr on every occasion (barring the tragic death of their Prince). But as the story goes on, it becomes increasingly clear that the Zirr's take on the Family is a fabrication, and most of their victories were nothing of the sort. The instigating event of the story is the Zirr abducting a "war criminal" (actually just the wife of a member of the Family, who has no powers) and putting her into trial-by-combat, and they frame the Family attempting to rescue her as "a treacherous and undeclared act of aggression." At the end of the issue, the news broadcast claims that the Family left because the Emperor decided to grant them mercy and exile them, and they destroyed a piece of artwork in the throne room in a fit of pique. However, the child, who understands the language the broadcast isn't bothering to translate, realizes that the "artwork" was a vital piece of communications tech, and its destruction will leave their military crippled for some time.

to:

* A story in ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' deals with a child growing up in the Zirr Empire, an alien regime that keeps getting into conflict with the [[TheFantasticFaux First Family]], a superhero team. The Family are constantly framed as aggressors standing in the way of galactic peace, who have been trounced by the Zirr on every occasion (barring the tragic death of their Prince). But as the story goes on, it becomes increasingly clear that the Zirr's take on the Family is a fabrication, and most of their victories were nothing of the sort. The instigating event of the story is the Zirr abducting a "war criminal" (actually just the wife of a member of the Family, who has no powers) powers and putting was the only person they could take hostage in a raid on the Family's headquarters) and sentencing her into trial-by-combat, to trial by combat, and they frame the Family attempting to rescue her as "a treacherous and undeclared act of aggression." At the end of the issue, the news broadcast claims that the Family left because the Emperor decided to grant them mercy and exile them, and they destroyed a piece of artwork in the throne room in a fit of pique. However, the child, who understands the language the broadcast isn't bothering to translate, realizes that the Family actually won a crushing victory, the "artwork" was a vital piece of communications tech, and its destruction will leave their military crippled for some time.


* A story in ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' deals with a child growing up in the Zirr Empire, an alien regime that keeps getting into conflict with the [[FantasticFaux First Family]], a superhero team. The Family are constantly framed as aggressors standing in the way of galactic peace, who have been trounced by the Zirr on every occasion (barring the tragic death of their Prince). But as the story goes on, it becomes increasingly clear that the Zirr's take on the Family is a fabrication, and most of their victories were nothing of the sort. The instigating event of the story is the Zirr abducting a "war criminal" (actually just the wife of a member of the Family, who has no powers) and putting her into trial-by-combat, and they frame the Family attempting to rescue her as "a treacherous and undeclared act of aggression." At the end of the issue, the news broadcast claims that the Family left because the Emperor decided to grant them mercy and exile them, and they destroyed a piece of artwork in the throne room in a fit of pique. However, the child, who understands the language the broadcast isn't bothering to translate, realizes that the "artwork" was a vital piece of communications tech, and its destruction will leave their military crippled for some time.

to:

* A story in ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' deals with a child growing up in the Zirr Empire, an alien regime that keeps getting into conflict with the [[FantasticFaux [[TheFantasticFaux First Family]], a superhero team. The Family are constantly framed as aggressors standing in the way of galactic peace, who have been trounced by the Zirr on every occasion (barring the tragic death of their Prince). But as the story goes on, it becomes increasingly clear that the Zirr's take on the Family is a fabrication, and most of their victories were nothing of the sort. The instigating event of the story is the Zirr abducting a "war criminal" (actually just the wife of a member of the Family, who has no powers) and putting her into trial-by-combat, and they frame the Family attempting to rescue her as "a treacherous and undeclared act of aggression." At the end of the issue, the news broadcast claims that the Family left because the Emperor decided to grant them mercy and exile them, and they destroyed a piece of artwork in the throne room in a fit of pique. However, the child, who understands the language the broadcast isn't bothering to translate, realizes that the "artwork" was a vital piece of communications tech, and its destruction will leave their military crippled for some time.

Added DiffLines:

* A story in ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' deals with a child growing up in the Zirr Empire, an alien regime that keeps getting into conflict with the [[FantasticFaux First Family]], a superhero team. The Family are constantly framed as aggressors standing in the way of galactic peace, who have been trounced by the Zirr on every occasion (barring the tragic death of their Prince). But as the story goes on, it becomes increasingly clear that the Zirr's take on the Family is a fabrication, and most of their victories were nothing of the sort. The instigating event of the story is the Zirr abducting a "war criminal" (actually just the wife of a member of the Family, who has no powers) and putting her into trial-by-combat, and they frame the Family attempting to rescue her as "a treacherous and undeclared act of aggression." At the end of the issue, the news broadcast claims that the Family left because the Emperor decided to grant them mercy and exile them, and they destroyed a piece of artwork in the throne room in a fit of pique. However, the child, who understands the language the broadcast isn't bothering to translate, realizes that the "artwork" was a vital piece of communications tech, and its destruction will leave their military crippled for some time.

Added DiffLines:

* This is the plot of the Kaleidoscope extension of ''VideoGame/{{Tattletail}}''. Mama (having been banished into a videotape) has altered your memories so that you believe Tattletail is a boring, educational toy (rather than a fun, mischevious toy), and that Mama is kind (rather than murderous). The only way to get your real memories back is to enter the Kaleidoscope, find the tape, and destroy it.


Subtrope of, and is most likely to happen when history is, WrittenByTheWinners. UnPerson is a variety where individuals are "retconned away". DeceasedFallGuyGambit is another form of this. For when the past isn't so much completely changed as painted in a more favorable or less favorable light, see TreacheryCoverUp and HistoricalVillainUpgrade. When this trope is about constantly denied fears or threats, then it is NoMereWindmill. If the authorities ''literally'' change the past, that's a CosmicRetcon. Not to be confused with the Doylist OrwellianRetcon, where later editions of earlier parts of the work are changed to fit into the retcon.

to:

Subtrope of, and is most likely to happen when history is, WrittenByTheWinners. UnPerson is a variety where individuals are "retconned away". DeceasedFallGuyGambit is another form of this. For when the past isn't so much completely changed as painted in a more favorable or less favorable light, see TreacheryCoverUp and HistoricalVillainUpgrade. When this trope is about constantly denied fears or threats, then it is NoMereWindmill. If the authorities ''literally'' change the past, that's a CosmicRetcon.CosmicRetcon or {{Retconjuration}}. Not to be confused with the Doylist OrwellianRetcon, where later editions of earlier parts of the work are changed to fit into the retcon.


* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Lie of the Land", the aliens that have taken over Earth brainwash everyone with propaganda that they have always been there, guiding the evolution of humanity and civilization. People who disagree with the so-called "True History" are arrested by the Memory Police and sent to a forced labor camp.

to:

* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Lie of the Land", the aliens that have taken over Earth brainwash everyone with propaganda that they have always been there, guiding the evolution of humanity and civilization.civilization, while in reality they have only been there for a few months. People who disagree with the so-called "True History" are arrested by the Memory Police and sent to a forced labor camp.


* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Lie of the Land," the aliens that have taken over Earth brainwash everyone with propaganda that they have always been there, guiding the evolution of humanity and civilization. People who disagree with this history are arrested by the Memory Police and sent to a forced labor camp.

to:

* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Lie of the Land," Land", the aliens that have taken over Earth brainwash everyone with propaganda that they have always been there, guiding the evolution of humanity and civilization. People who disagree with this history the so-called "True History" are arrested by the Memory Police and sent to a forced labor camp.

Added DiffLines:

* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Lie of the Land," the aliens that have taken over Earth brainwash everyone with propaganda that they have always been there, guiding the evolution of humanity and civilization. People who disagree with this history are arrested by the Memory Police and sent to a forced labor camp.


* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' the Third Hokage made it illegal for anyone to talk about the Kyuubi being sealed into Naruto in an attempt to give him a normal childhood. The children were simply told that the Fourth had defeated the Kyuubi.

to:

* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' the ''Manga/{{Naruto}}''
** The
Third Hokage made it illegal for anyone to talk about the Kyuubi being sealed into Naruto in an attempt to give him a normal childhood. The children were simply told that the Fourth had defeated the Kyuubi.


Added DiffLines:

** The Sage of Six Paths is a figure of myth, with only fragmented stories which leads many people to assume he was fictional. The reason for this is that during the Warring Clans Era [[spoiler:Black Zetsu]] deliberately modified or destroyed all records of the Sage's life [[spoiler:to hide the existence of Kaguya]]. All of this was part of a scheme to manipulate [[spoiler:the Uchiha clan by guiding them down a path that would revive her]].

Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/PokemonSwordAndShield'' legend holds that an ancient hero saved Galar on the Darkest Day and was made king. This legend quickly falls apart, especially when an ancient mural is destroyed to reveal a statue commemorating the ''two'' heroes and the Pokémon who fought at their side. Post-game the descendants of the royal family admit that their ancestors deliberately covered up the statues, presumably to hog the glory for themselves.


** The Chantry also does this for minor personal details, such as your love interests. In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'', if the PlayerCharacter is male and romances [[GayOption Dorian]], Dorian can remark at one point that he wonders how long [[BuryYourGays before the Chantry writes]] ''[[BuryYourGays that]]'' [[BuryYourGays part out of retellings]] of the Inquisitor's life, though not so much because they're both men but because Dorian is from the Tevinter Imperium, who are pretty much considered heretical by the Southern Chantry.[[labelnote:*]]Mainly because they have their ''own'' version of the Chantry, who both considers the "Southern" Chantry heretical and is in turn considered heretical by the Southern Chantry themselves. Suffice to say they're not on good terms at all.[[/labelnote]]

to:

** The Chantry also does this for minor personal details, such as your love interests. In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'', if the PlayerCharacter is male and romances [[GayOption Dorian]], Dorian can remark at one point that he wonders how long [[BuryYourGays before the Chantry writes]] ''[[BuryYourGays that]]'' [[BuryYourGays part out of retellings]] of the Inquisitor's life, though not so much because they're both men but because Dorian is from the Tevinter Imperium, who are pretty much considered heretical by the sworn enemies of the Southern Chantry.[[labelnote:*]]Mainly because they have their ''own'' version of the Chantry, who both considers the "Southern" Chantry heretical and is in turn considered heretical by the Southern Chantry themselves. Suffice to say they're not on good terms at all.[[/labelnote]]


** The Chantry also does this for minor personal details, like [[BuryYourGays sexuality]]. In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'', if the PlayerCharacter is male and romances [[GayOption Dorian]], Dorian can remark at one point that he wonders how long before the Chantry writes ''that'' part out of retellings of the Inquisitor's life?
*** That probably has to do with the fact he's from Tevinter and nothing to do with the fact they're both men.

to:

** The Chantry also does this for minor personal details, like [[BuryYourGays sexuality]]. such as your love interests. In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'', if the PlayerCharacter is male and romances [[GayOption Dorian]], Dorian can remark at one point that he wonders how long [[BuryYourGays before the Chantry writes ''that'' writes]] ''[[BuryYourGays that]]'' [[BuryYourGays part out of retellings retellings]] of the Inquisitor's life?
*** That probably has to do with the fact he's from Tevinter and nothing to do with the fact
life, though not so much because they're both men.men but because Dorian is from the Tevinter Imperium, who are pretty much considered heretical by the Southern Chantry.[[labelnote:*]]Mainly because they have their ''own'' version of the Chantry, who both considers the "Southern" Chantry heretical and is in turn considered heretical by the Southern Chantry themselves. Suffice to say they're not on good terms at all.[[/labelnote]]


* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', the three-part opening arc of Season 2 involves a Bajoran hero named Li Nalas, famous for his single-handed defeat of an infamous Cardassian war criminal. As Li eventually explains to Sisko, he almost literally stumbled over said Cardassian as the latter was bathing, and shot as he was reaching for his own phaser. He related the events accurately, but because the Cardassian was so hated, his friends got it in their heads that it had been a heroic struggle and repeated this story all over Bajor, such that Li became a symbol for the Resistance, much to his own disdain. However, over the course of the arc, it becomes clear that he ''does'' possess heroic qualities including a willingness to risk his own life for others, ultimately culminating in [[spoiler:his making a HeroicSacrifice to save Sisko at the end.]]

to:

* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', the three-part opening arc of Season 2 involves a Bajoran hero named Li Nalas, famous for his single-handed defeat of an infamous Cardassian war criminal. As Li eventually explains to Sisko, he almost literally stumbled over said Cardassian as the latter was bathing, and shot as he was reaching for his own phaser. He related the events accurately, but because the Cardassian was so hated, his friends got it in their heads that it had been a heroic struggle and repeated this story all over Bajor, such that Li became a symbol for the Resistance, much to his own disdain. However, (However, over the course of the arc, it becomes clear that even if that particular story was heavily embellished, he ''does'' possess truly have heroic qualities including a willingness to risk his own life for others, traits, ultimately culminating in [[spoiler:his making a HeroicSacrifice to save Sisko at the end.]]Sisko.]])


* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', the three-part opening arc of Season 2 involves a Bajoran hero named Li Nalas, famous for his single-handed defeat of an infamous Cardassian war criminal. As Li eventually explains to Sisko, he almost literally stumbled over said Cardassian as the latter was bathing, and shot as he was reaching for his own phaser. He related the events accurately, but the story that got out was a heroic struggle, and Li became a symbol for the Resistance, much to his own disdain. However, over the course of the arc, it becomes clear that he ''does'' possess heroic qualities including a willingness to risk his own life for others, ultimately culminating in [[spoiler:his making a HeroicSacrifice to save Sisko at the end.]]

to:

* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', the three-part opening arc of Season 2 involves a Bajoran hero named Li Nalas, famous for his single-handed defeat of an infamous Cardassian war criminal. As Li eventually explains to Sisko, he almost literally stumbled over said Cardassian as the latter was bathing, and shot as he was reaching for his own phaser. He related the events accurately, but because the story Cardassian was so hated, his friends got it in their heads that got out was it had been a heroic struggle, struggle and repeated this story all over Bajor, such that Li became a symbol for the Resistance, much to his own disdain. However, over the course of the arc, it becomes clear that he ''does'' possess heroic qualities including a willingness to risk his own life for others, ultimately culminating in [[spoiler:his making a HeroicSacrifice to save Sisko at the end.]]


* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', the three-part opening arc of Season 2 involves a Bajoran hero named Li Nalas, famous for his single-handed defeat of an infamous Cardassian war criminal. As Li eventually explains to Sisko, he almost literally stumbled over said Cardassian as the latter was bathing, and shot as he was reaching for his own phaser. He related the events accurately, but the story that got out was a heroic struggle, and Li became a symbol for the Resistance, much to his own disdain. (He does eventually prove his true capacity for heroism when he [[spoiler:makes a HeroicSacrifice to save Sisko]].)

to:

* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', the three-part opening arc of Season 2 involves a Bajoran hero named Li Nalas, famous for his single-handed defeat of an infamous Cardassian war criminal. As Li eventually explains to Sisko, he almost literally stumbled over said Cardassian as the latter was bathing, and shot as he was reaching for his own phaser. He related the events accurately, but the story that got out was a heroic struggle, and Li became a symbol for the Resistance, much to his own disdain. (He does eventually prove However, over the course of the arc, it becomes clear that he ''does'' possess heroic qualities including a willingness to risk his true capacity own life for heroism when he [[spoiler:makes others, ultimately culminating in [[spoiler:his making a HeroicSacrifice to save Sisko]].)Sisko at the end.]]

Showing 15 edit(s) of 132

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report