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* The RPG.Net forums have "In Which I Watch" threads where people watch a show for the first time, or at least not having seen it recently, and comment on what they see.

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* The ''DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' novel ''The All-Consuming Fire'' (a ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' crossover). The headings usually use LiteralMetaphor or sardonic {{Understatement}}, so when you get to the relevant part you think "Wait, ''that's'' what that meant?"


* ''Mariken'', a Dutch children's novel by Peter van Gestel, is an adaptation of the miracle play or prose novel[[note]] depending on who you ask[[/note]] ''Mariken van Nieumeghen'' from the 16th century and it straight up uses this trope. The first chapter: (Dutch) 'Waarin Archibald uit de stad wordt verjaagd en tussen de bloeiende ganzeriken een klein meisje vindt' (English) 'In which Archibald is driven from the city and finds a little girl between the flowering cinquefoils'.
The original uses a variant: it has no clearly marked chapters because it's written like a play, but the acts are divided by descriptions beginning with 'How', e.g.: 'Hoe heer Ghijsbrecht Mariken zijnder nichten tot Nimmeghen ghesonden heeft./Hoe heer Gijsbrecht zijn nicht Mariken naar Nijmegen zond.', which is in English: 'How mister Gijsbrecht sent his niece Mariken to Nijmegen.'[[note]] Nieumeghen/Nimmeghen are old spellings of the Dutch city Nijmegen.[[/note]]

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* ''Mariken'', a Dutch children's novel by Peter van Gestel, is an adaptation of the miracle play or prose novel[[note]] depending novel (depending on who you ask[[/note]] ask) ''Mariken van Nieumeghen'' from the 16th century and it straight up uses this trope. The first chapter: (Dutch) E.g.: 'Waarin Archibald uit de stad wordt verjaagd en tussen de bloeiende ganzeriken een klein meisje vindt' (English) vindt', which is in English: 'In which Archibald is driven from the city and finds a little girl between the flowering cinquefoils'.
** The original uses a variant: it has no clearly marked chapters because it's written like a play, but the acts are divided by descriptions beginning with 'How', e.g.: 'Hoe heer Ghijsbrecht Mariken zijnder nichten tot Nimmeghen ghesonden heeft./Hoe heer Gijsbrecht zijn nicht Mariken naar Nijmegen zond.', which is in English: 'How mister Gijsbrecht sent his niece Mariken to Nijmegen.'[[note]] Nieumeghen/Nimmeghen are old spellings of the Dutch city Nijmegen.[[/note]]


* Creator/UmbertoEco's book ''Literature/TheNameOfTheRose'', in part a wonderful pastiche of SherlockHolmes set in a 14th century monastery, in which most of the divisions are headed with such a description, except for the Seventh Day, "In which, if it were to summarize the prodigious revelations of which it speaks, the title would have to be as long as the chapter itself, contrary to usage." Done largely to avoid having to put something like 'In which it is revealed that [[spoiler:go and read the damn book... or watch [[TheFilmOfTheBook the movie]]]] is the murderer'

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* Creator/UmbertoEco's book ''Literature/TheNameOfTheRose'', in part a wonderful pastiche of SherlockHolmes set in a 14th century monastery, in which most of the divisions are headed with such a description, except for the Seventh Day, "In which, if it were to summarize the prodigious revelations of which it speaks, the title would have to be as long as the chapter itself, contrary to usage." Done largely to avoid having to put something like 'In which it is revealed that [[spoiler:go and read the damn book... or watch [[TheFilmOfTheBook the movie]]]] X is the murderer'


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* ''Mariken'', a Dutch children's novel by Peter van Gestel, is an adaptation of the miracle play or prose novel[[note]] depending on who you ask[[/note]] ''Mariken van Nieumeghen'' from the 16th century and it straight up uses this trope. The first chapter: (Dutch) 'Waarin Archibald uit de stad wordt verjaagd en tussen de bloeiende ganzeriken een klein meisje vindt' (English) 'In which Archibald is driven from the city and finds a little girl between the flowering cinquefoils'.
The original uses a variant: it has no clearly marked chapters because it's written like a play, but the acts are divided by descriptions beginning with 'How', e.g.: 'Hoe heer Ghijsbrecht Mariken zijnder nichten tot Nimmeghen ghesonden heeft./Hoe heer Gijsbrecht zijn nicht Mariken naar Nijmegen zond.', which is in English: 'How mister Gijsbrecht sent his niece Mariken to Nijmegen.'[[note]] Nieumeghen/Nimmeghen are old spellings of the Dutch city Nijmegen.[[/note]]

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* ''The '44 Vintage'' by Creator/AnthonyPrice has chapter titles like "How Corporal Butler Was Saved By His Boots" and "How the Germans Spoilt a Good Plan".

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* The multiple-sentence-long "In which..." chapter titles in ''Literature/TheRestOfUsJustLiveHere'' tell a typical teen UrbanFantasy story. The chapters themselves tell a slightly overlapping story of "normal" students in the same world.

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* Every chapter of ''Literature/{{Water Margin}}''.


[[folder:Western Animation]]
* My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic has the season five episode 'The one where Pinkie Pie knows' which is a parody on the comedy series Friends.
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[[folder:Western %%[[folder:Western Animation]]
* My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic has the season five episode 'The one where Pinkie Pie knows' which is a parody on the comedy series Friends.
[[/folder]]
%%[[/folder]]

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* Every chapter in "Tales from the Abridgement", ''FanFic/ThomasAbridged'''s anthology-but-not-really spin-off starts with "In Which...".

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* Howard Pyle does this with his chapter names in his children's literature versions of ''Myth/RobinHood'' and ''Myth/KingArthur''.


A convention of giving a chapter (or work) a name that is a summation of the contents ''of the chapter'' (or work). It used to be a serious writing convention; many 18th- and 19th-century (and occasionally, early 20th-century) works had extended titles that pretty much summed up the main events of the installment, but it is not as likely to be taken seriously today. In modern works, this is a [[TitleTropes titling convention]] with an intentionally {{Retraux}} feel.

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A convention of giving a chapter (or work) a name that is a summation of the contents ''of the chapter'' (or work). It used to be a serious writing convention; many 18th- 17th- and 19th-century 18th-century (and occasionally, early 20th-century) 19th-century) works had extended titles that pretty much summed up the main events of the installment, but it is not as likely to be taken seriously today. In modern works, this is a [[TitleTropes titling convention]] with an intentionally {{Retraux}} feel.



This trope probably descends from the poets' practice (common in the Renaissance era) of putting short summaries called "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument_%28literature%29 arguments]]" before every section of their poems.

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This trope probably descends comes from the poets' practice (common in the Renaissance era) of putting short summaries called "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument_%28literature%29 arguments]]" before every section of their poems.


!! In Which the Details of the literary Convention "In Which a Trope Is Described" shall be Disseminated

A convention of giving a chapter (or work) a name which is a summation of the contents ''of the chapter'' (or work). It used to be a serious writing convention--many 18th- and 19th-century (and occasionally, early 20th-century) works had extended titles which pretty much summed up the main events of the installment--but it is not as likely to be taken seriously today. In modern works, this is a [[TitleTropes titling convention]] with an intentionally {{Retraux}} feel.

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!! In Which the Details of the literary Convention "In Which a Trope Is Described" shall will be Disseminated

A convention of giving a chapter (or work) a name which that is a summation of the contents ''of the chapter'' (or work). It used to be a serious writing convention--many convention; many 18th- and 19th-century (and occasionally, early 20th-century) works had extended titles which that pretty much summed up the main events of the installment--but installment, but it is not as likely to be taken seriously today. In modern works, this is a [[TitleTropes titling convention]] with an intentionally {{Retraux}} feel.



An equally old-fashioned variant is when the title consists of a number of short phrases which enumerate the main plot points of the chapter (and occasionally irrelevant side details). For instance: "A Trope is described.--The Summary of its Qualities.--'In Which Examples Are Listed'.--The Contributors provide the aforemention'd Examples.--End of the Page"

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An equally old-fashioned variant is when the title consists of a number of short phrases which that enumerate the main plot points of the chapter (and occasionally irrelevant side details). For instance: "A Trope is described.--The Summary of its Qualities.--'In Which Examples Are Listed'.--The Contributors provide the aforemention'd Examples.--End of the Page"


* Kim Stanley Robinson's ''The Years of Rice and Salt'' is divided into several sections, but the first section features chapter headings in this style.

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* Kim Stanley Robinson's ''The Years of Rice and Salt'' ''Literature/TheYearsOfRiceAndSalt'' is divided into several sections, but the first section features chapter headings in this style.


* The Polish novel ''Księga urwisów'' uses the "plot point listing" variant for nearly all chapters.

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* The Polish novel ''Księga urwisów'' uses the "plot point listing" variant for nearly all chapters. Such as "An opportunity comes up. Unforeseen obstacle. Escape".

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* The Polish novel ''Księga urwisów'' uses the "plot point listing" variant for nearly all chapters.

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