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** Laws commanding adulteresses and other sex offenders to be stoned sound like pretty harsh HonorRelatedAbuse. Then you reread them and notice that ''the man too'' must be punished. Unusually even-handed, given that even some modern societies punish only the woman and let the man play KarmaHoudini. Of course, the law wasn't always ''enforced'' that way, as demonstrated in the story of [[http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John%208:1-11&version=NIV the woman caught in adultery]], that mentions nothing about her lover being stoned to death along with her, even though [[CaptainObvious he was caught in the act]] too (which in itself is not a proof for him not getting stoned, though)...

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** Laws commanding adulteresses and other sex offenders to be stoned sound like pretty harsh HonorRelatedAbuse. Then you reread them and notice that ''the man too'' must be punished. Unusually even-handed, given that even some modern societies punish only the woman and let the man play KarmaHoudini. Of course, the law wasn't always ''enforced'' that way, as demonstrated in the story of [[http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John%208:1-11&version=NIV the woman caught in adultery]], that mentions nothing about her lover being stoned to death along with her, even though [[CaptainObvious he was caught in the act]] act too (which in itself is not a proof for him not getting stoned, though)...


* ''Franchise/TombRaider'''s protagonist, Lara Croft has been seen by some as obvious {{fanservice}} for adolescent male fantasies, given her [[BuxomIsBetter generous proportions]], not really helped by the developers admitting the reason why she was a female was so gamers wouldn't have to look at a guy's ass all day. However, at the time Lara was a pretty big step forward for women in gaming, who even when they were in lead roles in action or fighting games tended to be DamselInDistress types. Having a female character that not only had a strong personality, but didn't have a male character coming to her rescue at any time was something few games had tried in the past and none saw the same mass-market success. If nothing else, the series proved that gamers--at the time largely stereotyped as violence-addicted immature adolescent males--were mature enough to at least tolerate playing a female character.

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* ''Franchise/TombRaider'''s protagonist, Lara Croft has been seen by some as obvious {{fanservice}} for adolescent male fantasies, given her [[BuxomIsBetter generous proportions]], not really helped by the developers admitting the reason why she was a female was so gamers wouldn't have to look at a guy's ass all day. However, at the time Lara was a pretty big step forward for women in gaming, who even when they were in lead roles in action or fighting games tended to be DamselInDistress types. Having a female character that not only had a strong personality, but didn't have a male character coming to her rescue at any time was something few games had tried in the past and none saw the same mass-market success. [[note]]Though Metroid arguably gets at least as much name recognition.[[/note]] If nothing else, the series proved that gamers--at the time largely stereotyped as violence-addicted immature adolescent males--were mature enough to at least tolerate playing a female character.


** Communist movements in Third World post-colonial nations, generally played a key role in developing film industries, raising literacy, increasing life expectancy and other poverty relief measures. The Soviet Union and Fidel Castro likewise lent crucial support to UsefulNotes/NelsonMandela in a time when he hadn't become a global icon.

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** Communist movements in Third World post-colonial nations, generally played a key role in developing film industries, raising literacy, increasing life expectancy and other poverty relief measures. The Soviet Union and Fidel Castro likewise lent crucial support to UsefulNotes/NelsonMandela Nelson Mandela in a time when he hadn't become a global icon.


* The exams performed in the various Empires of ImperialChina from the time of the Song (10th century) onward may seem overly restrictive today, what with the fact that one highly difficult test could make or break your prospects (until you re-sat it). However, these tests were designed to break the power of the Song Empire's feudal aristocracy by allowing middle-class people to get civil service jobs. They succeeded. Their unique societal fusion of the aristocracy and middle class into the so-called 'scholar-gentry'/'literati' class was continued by the later Yuan, Ming, and Qing empires. In an era when most countries awarded positions within the administration and army based on 'divine right', 'noble' birth, and political connections this was ''extremely'' progressive if not outright revolutionary. The idea that the daily business of government and warfare would not be stopped by mere politics was pretty darned radical.

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* The exams performed in the various Empires of ImperialChina UsefulNotes/ImperialChina from the time of the Song (10th century) onward may seem overly restrictive today, what with the fact that one highly difficult test could make or break your prospects (until you re-sat it). However, these tests were designed to break the power of the Song Empire's feudal aristocracy by allowing middle-class people to get civil service jobs. They succeeded. Their unique societal fusion of the aristocracy and middle class into the so-called 'scholar-gentry'/'literati' class was continued by the later Yuan, Ming, and Qing empires. In an era when most countries awarded positions within the administration and army based on 'divine right', 'noble' birth, and political connections this was ''extremely'' progressive if not outright revolutionary. The idea that the daily business of government and warfare would not be stopped by mere politics was pretty darned radical.


** There really is a town called Cucamonga -- actually it's Rancho Cucamonga -- and it has a Jack Benny Street, intersecting with a major thoroughfare called Rochester Avenue.


* A heartwarming inversion, a zero sum game if you wish: In the Ultimate [[Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood Mister Rogers]] Documentary "Wonít You Be My Neighbor", there turned out that there was exactly one piece of dirt uncovered about the man himself: *deep sigh* "He wasnít as ahead of his time as he could have been regarding his friend and colleauge François Clemmons open homosexuality!" In 1968 Roger said that he didnít care one bit about it personally, but suggested that he should get married in order to hide his homosexuality (which he did, it didnít work out), and in the decades following refused him to be Out on the show, to the point to refusing him to wear his ear-ring in his right ear (a common gay signal at the time) on the show, and how he '''eventually''' came to grips about all of this. And while all of this was being revealed, Clemmons himself (one of the core interviews) spent his entire screen time talking about the man as if he had been working for Jesus Christ Himself.


* Unlike other examples here, the "for its day" part in ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' wasn't merely a ''comparatively'' positive portrayal that was nonetheless unfortunately marred; the caricatures in the book were part of a conscious ''subversion'' of such portrayals, as they reflect how black people look through the eyes of a racist child; as the book progresses, and Huck wises up, the black characters become less and less cartoonish. Much is made of Jim's many humorously absurd superstitions, but it should be noted that many of his predictions actually come true, and many white characters believe things that are no less absurd. Strangely, this makes the book fall into somewhat of an UncannyValley of race relations, with its invocation of NWordPrivileges causing more trouble than books that are much, much more prejudiced.

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* Unlike other examples here, the "for its day" part in ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' wasn't merely a ''comparatively'' positive portrayal that was nonetheless unfortunately marred; the caricatures in the book were part of a conscious ''subversion'' of such portrayals, as they reflect how black people look through the eyes of a racist child; as the book progresses, and Huck wises up, the black characters become less and less cartoonish. Much is made of Jim's many humorously absurd superstitions, but it should be noted that many of his predictions actually come true, suspicions are frequently vindicated, and many white characters believe things that are no less absurd. just as if not more preposterous. As is requisite for any complex and well-rounded character, Jim has flaws and virtues like a real human being. While he's superstitious and blows off his chores [[note]]That's not entirely unreasonable, as it ''is'' literally slave labor. It's not like he would relish being forced to do degrading physical labor against his will.[[/note]], but he's also determined, clear-sighted, compassionate, and has strong moral convictions, as seen with his love for his family and his protective instincts towards Huck. Strangely, this makes the book fall into somewhat of an UncannyValley of race relations, with its invocation of NWordPrivileges causing more trouble than books that are much, much more prejudiced.legitimately prejudiced. The N-bomb was part of common parlance for the impoverished, backwards southerners depicted in the novel, so it's not like Twain misrepresenting reality.


* Disney's [[OldShame current stance]] on ''Film/SongOfTheSouth'' is that it is too racially insensitive even for a home video release. The movie is an adaptation of Joel Chandler Harris's renditions of actual African-American folk tales, featuring the framing tale telling the story of the narrator, Uncle Remus. Remus is a sharecropper during the Reconstruction era of the United States, just after the Civil War. Sharecroppers were free men, but many were former slaves, and most lived hard lives being exploited by landlords and even their former masters. The film has been criticized for portraying Remus as a happy, carefree man who spends his time entertaining local white children, which was seen as whitewashing history and aligning Remus with previous stereotypes of "happy slaves" presented by slavery apologists. However, the film also presents Remus as intelligent and mature, keeping his white neighbors' family together through his care. One should also consider that the film is a cartoon for children when examining its upbeat, innocent tone. Creator/WaltDisney intended to pay tribute to the African-American folk tales he had loved as a child. He even campaigned for James Baskett, who portrayed Remus, to receive an honorary Academy Award, the first one awarded to a black man.

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* Disney's [[OldShame current stance]] on ''Film/SongOfTheSouth'' is that it is too racially insensitive even for a home video release. The movie is an adaptation of Joel Chandler Harris's Harris' renditions of actual African-American folk tales, featuring the with a framing tale telling the story of the about Harris' narrator, Uncle Remus. Remus is a sharecropper during the Reconstruction era of the United States, just after the Civil War. Sharecroppers were free men, but many were former slaves, and most lived hard lives being exploited by landlords and even their former masters.landowners. The film has been criticized for portraying Remus as a happy, carefree man who spends his time entertaining local white children, which was seen as whitewashing history and aligning Remus with previous stereotypes of "happy slaves" presented by slavery apologists. However, the film also presents Remus as intelligent and mature, keeping his white neighbors' family together through his care. One should also consider that the film is a cartoon for children when examining its upbeat, innocent tone. Creator/WaltDisney intended to pay tribute to the African-American folk tales he had loved as a child. He even campaigned for James Baskett, who portrayed Remus, to receive an honorary Academy Award, the first one awarded to a black man.



* The film of ''Film/LiveAndLetDie'' may look incredibly offensive today with its seeming stereotyping of all black people as superstitious drug-dealing criminals. However, the film was surprisingly liberal for its time in showing Bond in an inter-racial relationship, two of the most competent agents in the film (Quarrel Jr. and Strutter) are black, and the most incompetent of the 'heroes' is the racist sheriff, J.W. Pepper, who is explicitly shown as an idiot. While the black mooks are walking blackface stereotypes, Mr. Big himself is every bit as intelligent, sophisticated and charismatic as any other Bond villain. It is also far less racist than the original Creator/IanFleming book.

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* The film of ''Film/LiveAndLetDie'' may look incredibly offensive today with its seeming stereotyping of all black people as superstitious drug-dealing criminals. However, the film was surprisingly liberal for its time in showing Bond in an inter-racial interracial relationship, two of the most competent agents in the film (Quarrel Jr. and Strutter) are black, and the most incompetent of the 'heroes' "heroes" is the racist sheriff, J.W. Pepper, who is explicitly shown as an idiot. While the black mooks are walking blackface stereotypes, Mr. Big himself is every bit as intelligent, sophisticated and charismatic as any other Bond villain. It is also far less racist than the original Creator/IanFleming book.



** In the Early 60s, Ford even made ''Cheyenne Autumn'' which portrayed the Cheyenne tribe with nobility and sympathy and sharply criticized the American government policy towards Indian tribes. Ford even made ''Sergeant Rutledge'' an attempt to make Woody Strode, a character actor in many of his films, the first African-American movie star.
** On a general note, many scholars note that the rise of the spaghetti west and the TwilightOfTheOldWest movies and other revisionist films that came in TheSixties and TheSeventies, the end result has been that TheWestern became [[GenreKiller a dead genre]]. The unintended consequence has been the virtual drying up of on-screen representations of Native Americans. The earlier westerns while flawed, crude and stereotyped [[AtLeastIAdmitIt at least admitted]] that wars with the Native Tribes were crucial parts of American history, and kept the names of Geronimo, Dull Knife and other famous Indian chiefs, tribes and warriors in popular memory. Modern Hollywood rarely ventures and portrays Native American culture and life in modern America or offer many roles, to the point that funding for such films has dried up and films like ''Dead Man'', ''The Exiles'' or Creator/JohnnyDepp's ''The Brave'' are obscure.
** A lot of revisionist Westerns made in the '50s and '60s, which were daring enough to depict Native Americans sympathetically, haven't aged well, whether due to NobleSavage stereotyping or off-color casting. ''Film/BrokenArrow1950'' being the best example: Jeff Chandler's Cochise was considered groundbreaking, as an honest, sympathetic, and intelligent Apache Indian -- but today comes off as an improbably perfect wise man, played by a Jewish New Yorker. Later films like ''Film/LittleBigMan'' [[note]] which had a swarthy-skinned white youth (Creator/DustinHoffman) passing as a Native American in-story, which wasn't much better [[/note]] and ''Film/DancesWithWolves'', which feature Native American actors playing Native Americans, haven't helped.
** Creator/NicholasRay's ''The Savage Innocents'' was shot on location in the Arctic and was intended to subvert the stereotypes of Eskimos and Inuit, a fact that a modern audience will see as fundamentally compromised on account of its casting of Anthony Quinn rather than an Inuit actor as a lead (which Robert Flaherty did with Film/NanookOfTheNorth), and equally offensively, for casting Japanese actress Yoko Tani as Quinn's wife. However as noted by Tag Gallagher in the context of films made in that time:

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** In the Early 60s, Ford even made ''Cheyenne Autumn'' which portrayed the Cheyenne tribe with nobility and sympathy and sharply criticized the American government policy towards Indian tribes. Ford even made ''Sergeant Rutledge'' an attempt to make Woody Strode, a character actor in many of his films, the first African-American movie star.
** On a general note, many scholars note that the rise of the spaghetti west and the TwilightOfTheOldWest movies and other revisionist films that came in TheSixties and TheSeventies, the end result has been that TheWestern became [[GenreKiller a dead genre]]. The unintended consequence has been the virtual drying up of on-screen representations of Native Americans. The earlier westerns while flawed, crude and stereotyped [[AtLeastIAdmitIt at least admitted]] that wars with the Native Tribes were crucial parts of American history, and kept the names of Geronimo, Dull Knife and other famous Indian chiefs, tribes and warriors in popular memory. Modern Hollywood rarely ventures and portrays Native American culture and life in modern America or offer many roles, to the point that funding for such films has dried up and films like ''Dead Man'', ''The Exiles'' or Creator/JohnnyDepp's ''The Brave'' are obscure.
**
* A lot of revisionist Westerns made in the '50s and '60s, which were daring enough to depict Native Americans sympathetically, haven't aged well, whether due to NobleSavage stereotyping or off-color casting. ''Film/BrokenArrow1950'' being the best example: Jeff Chandler's Cochise was considered groundbreaking, as an honest, sympathetic, and intelligent Apache Indian -- but today comes off as an improbably perfect wise man, played by a Jewish New Yorker. Later films like ''Film/LittleBigMan'' [[note]] which had a swarthy-skinned white youth (Creator/DustinHoffman) passing as a Native American in-story, which wasn't much better [[/note]] and ''Film/DancesWithWolves'', which feature Native American actors playing Native Americans, haven't helped.\n**
*
Creator/NicholasRay's ''The Savage Innocents'' was shot on location in the Arctic and was intended to subvert the stereotypes of Eskimos and Inuit, a fact that a modern audience will see as fundamentally compromised on account of its casting of Anthony Quinn rather than an Inuit actor as a lead (which Robert Flaherty did with Film/NanookOfTheNorth), and equally offensively, for casting Japanese actress Yoko Tani as Quinn's wife. However as noted by Tag Gallagher in the context of films made in that time:



* ''Film/{{Them}}'' is another 50's monster flick that has a progressive female lead in entomologist Dr. Pat Medford. She's a competent professional who ably assists in dealing with the film's giant mutant ants, including going down with the male (non-scientist) heroes into a gassed colony to make sure the inhabitants are all dead. She does scream once, when she abruptly and unexpectedly comes face to face with one of the creatures, but beyond that moment she also never falls into the DistressedDamsel catagory.

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* ''Film/{{Them}}'' is another 50's 1950s monster flick that has a progressive female lead in entomologist Dr. Pat Medford. She's a competent professional who ably assists in dealing with the film's giant mutant ants, including going down with the male (non-scientist) heroes into a gassed colony to make sure the inhabitants are all dead. She does scream once, when she abruptly and unexpectedly comes face to face with one of the creatures, but beyond that moment she also never falls into the DistressedDamsel catagory.category.


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* ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys'' is notorious for its {{yellowface}} caricature Mr. Yunioshi, played by Mickey Rooney. However, the film does at least give him a respectable profession as an artistic photographer rather than saddle him with a stereotypical trade, such as running a laundry or restaurant. Judging by the comments of Holly's friends, he's quite talented. The film also pointedly features a mixed-race couple at Holly's party consisting of a white man and Chinese woman, putting them in the center of the frame in several scenes. This was pretty progressive for 1961, when whites were still barred from marrying Asians in nine states.


* "Baby, It's Cold Outside" generates controversy today that would have baffled its original 1940's audience. While today's listeners hear a man continuing to pressure a woman into sex after she has said no several times, it wasn't meant to convey that imagery when it was first written. It was literally about a woman staying overnight in a man's house during a heavy snow, which back then would have been scandalous in and of itself. Society of the day understood the woman's "no" to be merely obligatory, for propriety's sake, and that she was in no danger. Also, the line "What's in this drink?" wasn't mean to imply that he had slipped her a date rape drug, but merely that the drink contained alcohol.
** The social mores of the time were far from balanced, with [[AManIsNotAVirgin men expected to be widely sexually active]] and [[AManIsAlwaysEager ready to partake in it whenever they get the chance]]. Women, meanwhile [[AllWomenArePrudes were definitely expected to wait for marriage]] and pretend to have no interest in sex at all aside from pleasing her husband and becoming a mother. In other words, sex for recreation was a strict no-no for single women, but expected for single men. In order to overcome this, the men had to be persistent ("I wore her down" was a frequent brag) and women had to either pretend nothing happened or behave as if she had no choice. The woman in the song wants to have sex with the man, offering increasingly lame excuses, and even pretends her drink is weakening her resolve, which was an oft-used excuse when women were caught ("My drink was too strong"). She finally joins him in agreeing it's cold outside and she should stay, "giving in" but sounding happy to do so.

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* "Baby, It's Cold Outside" generates controversy today that would have baffled its original 1940's 1940s audience. While today's listeners hear Modern audiences often accuse the lyrics of sounding like a date rape, with the man continuing refusing to pressure a woman into sex after she has said no several times, it wasn't meant to convey that imagery when it was first written. It was literally about a woman staying overnight in a man's house during a heavy snow, which back then would have been scandalous in and of itself. Society of the day understood accept the woman's "no" constant barrage of refusals until he finally breaks her down enough to be merely obligatory, for propriety's sake, and that she was in no danger. Also, the do something against her will. The line in which she remarks, "What's in this drink?" wasn't mean to imply that he had slipped her a date rape drug, but merely that is also seen as sounding like she's being drugged, However, when the drink contained alcohol.
** The social mores of the time
song was written (by a man specifically to perform with his wife at cocktail parties) societal pressures were far from balanced, with [[AManIsNotAVirgin men very different. AManIsAlwaysEager and AllWomenArePrudes were fully enforced, so courtship was a delicate game of manners where women were expected to be widely sexually active]] and [[AManIsAlwaysEager ready to partake in it whenever they get put up a token resistance for propriety's sake, while the chance]]. Women, meanwhile [[AllWomenArePrudes were definitely expected to wait for marriage]] and pretend to have no interest in sex at all aside from pleasing her husband and becoming a mother. In other words, sex for recreation man's job was a strict no-no for single women, but expected for single men. In order to overcome this, the men had pursue. The song is supposed to be persistent ("I wore her down" was a frequent brag) romantic couple playing out this dance of evasion and women had to either pretend nothing happened or behave as if she had no choice. The persuasion until the woman in feels that propriety has been met and she can allow herself to "give in." Her line about the song wants to have sex with the man, offering increasingly lame excuses, and even pretends her drink is weakening her resolve, which was an oft-used excuse when women were caught ("My drink was too strong"). She finally joins him in agreeing it's cold outside a common excuse among sexually active women at the time, blaming the alcohol for "weakening their resolve" to maintain pure, when they actually knew exactly what they wanted. To audiences of the time, the undertone of the story was fairly risque and she should stay, "giving in" but sounding happy to do so.liberating.

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** The social mores of the time were far from balanced, with [[AManIsNotAVirgin men expected to be widely sexually active]] and [[AManIsAlwaysEager ready to partake in it whenever they get the chance]]. Women, meanwhile [[AllWomenArePrudes were definitely expected to wait for marriage]] and pretend to have no interest in sex at all aside from pleasing her husband and becoming a mother. In other words, sex for recreation was a strict no-no for single women, but expected for single men. In order to overcome this, the men had to be persistent ("I wore her down" was a frequent brag) and women had to either pretend nothing happened or behave as if she had no choice. The woman in the song wants to have sex with the man, offering increasingly lame excuses, and even pretends her drink is weakening her resolve, which was an oft-used excuse when women were caught ("My drink was too strong"). She finally joins him in agreeing it's cold outside and she should stay, "giving in" but sounding happy to do so.


* UsefulNotes/AbrahamLincoln, despite being known for his firm stance against slavery, held views that would be considered very racist today (a good example being his [[http://www.learner.org/workshops/primarysources/emancipation/docs/address.html "Nobody likes you and you should get the hell out of the country for your own good"]] speech to some prominent black citizens). Also, as a politician, he had to balance his various interests against each other; simply outlawing slavery would massively disrupt society and the economy, and further divide the country against itself. His original plan, which ultimately only got a partial enactment in Washington, D.C., itself, was to buy out the slaveholders at the taxpayers' expense and ship the newly freed slaves back to Africa. Only when this plan didn't work out as he'd hoped and all the disruption and division he'd been trying to avoid happened anyway did he finally decide on a somewhat more radical course, and then only as it came to be to his political advantage. Thus, while he wasn't exactly a saintly abolitionist (and most people never were), he does earn considerable admiration as a crafty politician for having been able to compromise and cajole his way to the slaves' emancipation. (And he ''did'' hate slavery, and for entirely altruistic reasons, even if he usually didn't say so publicly.)

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* UsefulNotes/AbrahamLincoln, despite being known for his firm stance against slavery, held views that would be considered very racist today (a good example being his [[http://www.learner.org/workshops/primarysources/emancipation/docs/address.html "Nobody likes you and you should get the hell out of the country for your own good"]] speech to some prominent black citizens). Also, as a politician, he had to balance his various interests against each other; simply outlawing slavery would massively disrupt society and the economy, and further divide the country against itself. His original plan, which ultimately only got a partial enactment in Washington, D.C., itself, was to buy out the slaveholders at the taxpayers' expense and ship the newly freed slaves back to Africa. [[note]]Albeit, [[https://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2015/jun/26/blog-posting/did-abraham-lincoln-plan-send-ex-slaves-central-am/ if the slaves so chose]][[/note]] Only when this plan didn't work out as he'd hoped and all the disruption and division he'd been trying to avoid happened anyway did he finally decide on a somewhat more radical course, and then only as it came to be to his political advantage. Thus, while he wasn't exactly a saintly abolitionist (and most people never were), he does earn considerable admiration as a crafty politician for having been able to compromise and cajole his way to the slaves' emancipation. (And he ''did'' hate slavery, and for entirely altruistic reasons, even if he usually didn't say so publicly.)

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** The Koran allows men to take up to four wives. Modern audiences (and even many Muslims in more developed and progressive countries) are disgusted by any allowance of polygamy. However there is a notable caveat to that law: The man must show no favoritism and treat all wives equally. Seeing as how polygamy at the time was usually a nobleman having his "main" wife treated as a queen and the others basically just concubines for his enjoyment this was actually relatively egalitarian.


* Despite [[ReignOfTerror its modern-day associations]], [[OffWithHisHead the guillotine]] was the first execution method explicitly designed to be quick and painless, at a time when purposely brutal executions like drawing and quartering were still practiced.

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* Despite [[ReignOfTerror its modern-day associations]], [[OffWithHisHead the guillotine]] was the first execution method [[TheMoralSubstitute explicitly designed to be quick and painless, at a time when purposely brutal executions like drawing and quartering were still practiced.]] The same goes for hanging, the gas chamber, and electric chair: while they seem pretty gruesome to us and are rarely used anymore, they were intented as "nicer" ways to kill people.


* While UsefulNotes/RichardNixon is often characterized today as a backwards-looking, Archie Bunker-like racist curmudgeon, some of his personally held social views and policies of his administration were rather tolerant or even progressive by early 1970s standards. He continued the process of school desegregation and his administration regularly fought against racial discrimination in court (one of the most notable cases being when the Justice Department sued [[UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump The Trump Organization]] for housing discrimination in 1973). His administration also enacted programs that encouraged schools to expand athletic programs for girls (yes, our current standard of girls' athletics having equal stature to boys' athletics in our schools we owe to Nixon) and encouraged girls to participate in skills education. Privately, he didn't object to giving women legal access to an abortion (even though it was partially because he believed that [[CrossesTheLineTwice mixed-race babies should be aborted]]) and his privately-held views on homosexuality were rather tolerant and progressive for the time as well. (It's a condition they are born with and their attraction to the same gender is involuntary, and they should be left alone as long as they keep it behind closed doors. Just don't do it in public, don't encourage it and keep it away from kids.) However, it is undeniable that Nixon was a man who held numerous prejudices which were among his personal downfalls.

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* While UsefulNotes/RichardNixon is often characterized today as a backwards-looking, Archie Bunker-like racist curmudgeon, some of his personally held social views and policies of his administration were rather tolerant or even progressive by early 1970s standards. He continued the process of school desegregation and his administration regularly fought against racial discrimination in court (one of the most notable cases being when the Justice Department sued [[UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump The Trump Organization]] for housing discrimination in 1973). His administration also enacted programs that encouraged schools to expand athletic programs for girls (yes, our current standard of girls' athletics having equal stature to boys' athletics in our schools we owe to Nixon) and encouraged girls to participate in skills education. Privately, he didn't object to giving women legal access to an abortion (even though it was partially because he believed that [[CrossesTheLineTwice mixed-race babies should be aborted]]) and his privately-held views on homosexuality were rather tolerant and progressive for the time as well. (It's a condition they are born with and their attraction to the same gender is involuntary, and they should be left alone as long as they keep it behind closed doors. Just don't do it in public, don't encourage it and keep it away from kids.) However, it is undeniable that Nixon was Nixon, like many politicians of his time, seemed to possess a man who held numerous belief in ''legal'' equality between different racial, ethnic and gender groups with deplorable personal prejudices which were among (particularly his personal downfalls.obsessive antisemitism) that undeniably colored his thoughts, actions and occasionally his policies.


* Barry Goldwater. While he was regressive in many ways (such as supporting segregation) in other ways he was way ahead of his time (such as supporting allowing women and gay people into the military back in TheFifties and TheSixties).
** Goldwater didn't even support segregation per se, rather he was a hardline property rights advocate who while opposed to government-sanctioned discrimination (even helping push for desegregation in his home city of Phoenix) regarded preventing private businesses from discriminating on the basis of race was an example of government overreach.
* A heartwarming inversion, a zero sum game if you wish: In the Ultimate [[Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood Mister Rogers]] Documentary "Wonít You Be My Neighbor", there turned out that there was exactly one piece of dirt uncovered about the man himself: *deep sigh* "He wasnít as ahead of his time as he could have been regarding his friend and colleauge François Clemmons open homosexuality!". In 1968 Roger said that he didnít care one bit about it personally, but suggested that he should get married in order to hide his homosexuality (which he did, it didnít work out), and in the decades following refused him to be Out on the show, to the point to refusing him to wear his ear-ring in his right ear (a common gay signal at the time) on the show, and how he '''eventually''' came to grips about all of this. And while all of this was being revealed, Clemmons himself (one of the core interviews) spent his entire screen time talking about the man as if he had been working for Jesus Christ Himself.

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* Barry Goldwater. While he was regressive in Goldwater, the head of the Republican Party's conservative wing for many ways (such years, was and sometimes still is caricatured as supporting segregation) a bigoted reactionary. He was a hardline property rights advocate who opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 because he thought it violated the Constitution's rights to association (though he had supported desegregating the armed forces and personally helped desegregate his home city of Phoenix, he felt government involvement was unethical), and received heavy criticism for his militant anticommunism and extremely hawkish views on foreign policy. That said, in other ways he was way ahead of his time (such as supporting time. Notably, Goldwater supported allowing women and gay people into the military back in TheFifties and TheSixties).
** Goldwater didn't even support segregation per se, rather he
TheSixties, and was a hardline property rights advocate who while opposed to government-sanctioned discrimination (even helping push for desegregation in his home city extremely critical of Phoenix) regarded preventing private businesses from discriminating on the basis of race was an example of government overreach.
Religious Right's growing influence in the Republican Party.
* A heartwarming inversion, a zero sum game if you wish: In the Ultimate [[Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood Mister Rogers]] Documentary "Wonít You Be My Neighbor", there turned out that there was exactly one piece of dirt uncovered about the man himself: *deep sigh* "He wasnít as ahead of his time as he could have been regarding his friend and colleauge François Clemmons open homosexuality!". homosexuality!" In 1968 Roger said that he didnít care one bit about it personally, but suggested that he should get married in order to hide his homosexuality (which he did, it didnít work out), and in the decades following refused him to be Out on the show, to the point to refusing him to wear his ear-ring in his right ear (a common gay signal at the time) on the show, and how he '''eventually''' came to grips about all of this. And while all of this was being revealed, Clemmons himself (one of the core interviews) spent his entire screen time talking about the man as if he had been working for Jesus Christ Himself.

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