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* In Creator/FranzKafka's short story, ''Poseidon'', the [[Characters/ClassicalMythologyOlympians Greek god of the sea]], does not rule over his realm by chauffeuring the waters with his trident but rather [[BeleagueredBureaucrat by spending all his time filling out forms]] and [[PenPushingPresident writing administrative reports]] for his periodic trips to Olympus.

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* In Creator/FranzKafka's short story, ''Poseidon'', the [[Characters/ClassicalMythologyOlympians Greek god of the sea]], sea]] does not rule over his realm by chauffeuring the waters with his trident but rather instead [[BeleagueredBureaucrat by spending spends all his time filling out forms]] and [[PenPushingPresident writing administrative reports]] for his periodic trips to Olympus.


* In Creator/FranzKafka's short story, ''Poseidon'', the [[Characters/ClassicalMythologyOlympians Greek god of the sea]], who one would think would rule over his realm by chauffeuring the waters with his trident, has to instead [[BeleagueredBureaucrat spend all his time filling out forms]] and [[PenPushingPresident writing administrative reports]] for his periodic trips to Olympus.

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* In Creator/FranzKafka's short story, ''Poseidon'', the [[Characters/ClassicalMythologyOlympians Greek god of the sea]], who one would think would does not rule over his realm by chauffeuring the waters with his trident, has to instead trident but rather [[BeleagueredBureaucrat spend by spending all his time filling out forms]] and [[PenPushingPresident writing administrative reports]] for his periodic trips to Olympus.


** Yes, there are trolls and dwarves and vampires and goblins and wizards. They all live in the big city and are, for the most part, trying to get by in life like everyone else, with regular jobs and all. Every fantasy series has a big city -- few of them go into detail about how much trade and bureaucracy is needed to make that city ''work''. Creator/TerryPratchett has said the concept of the Discworld is taking a very realistic look at fantasy, and he envisioned it as a world that keeps functioning even when it's not on the page.

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** Yes, there are trolls and dwarves dwarfs and vampires and goblins and wizards. They all live in the big city and are, for the most part, trying to get by in life like everyone else, with regular jobs and all. Every fantasy series has a big city -- few of them go into detail about how much trade and bureaucracy is needed to make that city ''work''. Creator/TerryPratchett has said the concept of the Discworld is taking a very realistic look at fantasy, and he envisioned it as a world that keeps functioning even when it's not on the page.


* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' was created to showcase this trope. Yes, there are trolls and dwarves and vampires and goblins and wizards. They all live in the big city and are, for the most part, trying to get by in life like everyone else, with regular jobs and all. Every fantasy series has a big city -- few of them go into detail about how much trade and bureaucracy is needed to make that city ''work''. Creator/TerryPratchett has said the concept of the Discworld is taking a very realistic look at fantasy, and he envisioned it as a world that keeps functioning even when it's not on the page.

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* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' was created to showcase this trope.
**
Yes, there are trolls and dwarves and vampires and goblins and wizards. They all live in the big city and are, for the most part, trying to get by in life like everyone else, with regular jobs and all. Every fantasy series has a big city -- few of them go into detail about how much trade and bureaucracy is needed to make that city ''work''. Creator/TerryPratchett has said the concept of the Discworld is taking a very realistic look at fantasy, and he envisioned it as a world that keeps functioning even when it's not on the page.page.
** The same applies outside the big city. About ninety percent of a rural witch's work is a combination of district nurse and social worker (and occasionally community police officer), rather than magic.


[[folder: Fan Works]]
* In the ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' fanfic ''FanFic/DrowningInYourDepths,'' Dipper scoffs at the human superstition of people making [[DealWithTheDevil Deals With The Devil]] in return for durational benefits. According to him, demonic entities rarely ever attempt to purchase human souls that they cannot eat immediately. This is due to issues with storage and maintenance.
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[[folder: Fan Works]]
* In the ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' fanfic ''FanFic/DrowningInYourDepths,'' Dipper scoffs at the human superstition of people making [[DealWithTheDevil Deals With The Devil]] in return for durational benefits. According to him, demonic entities rarely ever attempt to purchase human souls that they cannot eat immediately. This is due to issues with storage and maintenance.
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* ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' universe is a very colorful, very stylish, and very headbanging world, but despite all the fantastical elements it still has to deal with racism (the [[VideoGame/Splatoon2 second game]] alone has a popular idol pass for the majority and get freaked out when a Splatfest sounds like the verge of a race war), shady businesses done for spending cash, prominent bands moving on or breaking up, and even old hangouts becoming ghost towns.


* Franchise{{Tron}}: {{Cyberspace}} is a beautiful, fantastic setting. The first film, it's under a totalitarian government persecuting religious believers, trying to invoke OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions so they viewed the state (and the [[AIISACrapshoot cruel AI in charge]]) as a quasi-god. The ''Betrayal'' comic and ''VideoGame/TronEvolution'' are all over FantasticRacism between Programs and Isos, with Clu cheerfully fanning the flames to get more power. TRON: Legacy has, again, a totalitarian government with Clu believing himself to be a liberator and benevolent dictator when the truth is that he was anything but. WesternAnimation/TRONUprising has criminal gangs, rogue scientists, Occupation forces who really believe that Clu's the best option, and the protagonist has to report to his "day job" in what amounts to an auto repair shop. Even ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' shows that spam, shady back market products, and criminal malware gangs are a headache on that side of the screen. {{Justified}} in that the digital world was built by humans and populated by digital avatars that reflect the best and worst of the humans who built them.

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* Franchise{{Tron}}: Franchise/{{Tron}}: {{Cyberspace}} is a beautiful, fantastic setting. The first film, it's under a totalitarian government persecuting religious believers, trying to invoke OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions so they viewed the state (and the [[AIISACrapshoot cruel AI in charge]]) as a quasi-god. The ''Betrayal'' comic and ''VideoGame/TronEvolution'' are all over FantasticRacism between Programs and Isos, with Clu cheerfully fanning the flames to get more power. TRON: Legacy has, again, a totalitarian government with Clu believing himself to be a liberator and benevolent dictator when the truth is that he was anything but. WesternAnimation/TRONUprising has criminal gangs, rogue scientists, Occupation forces who really believe that Clu's the best option, and the protagonist has to report to his "day job" in what amounts to an auto repair shop. Even ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' shows that spam, shady back market products, and criminal malware gangs are a headache on that side of the screen. {{Justified}} in that the digital world was built by humans and populated by digital avatars that reflect the best and worst of the humans who built them.

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* Franchise{{Tron}}: {{Cyberspace}} is a beautiful, fantastic setting. The first film, it's under a totalitarian government persecuting religious believers, trying to invoke OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions so they viewed the state (and the [[AIISACrapshoot cruel AI in charge]]) as a quasi-god. The ''Betrayal'' comic and ''VideoGame/TronEvolution'' are all over FantasticRacism between Programs and Isos, with Clu cheerfully fanning the flames to get more power. TRON: Legacy has, again, a totalitarian government with Clu believing himself to be a liberator and benevolent dictator when the truth is that he was anything but. WesternAnimation/TRONUprising has criminal gangs, rogue scientists, Occupation forces who really believe that Clu's the best option, and the protagonist has to report to his "day job" in what amounts to an auto repair shop. Even ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' shows that spam, shady back market products, and criminal malware gangs are a headache on that side of the screen. {{Justified}} in that the digital world was built by humans and populated by digital avatars that reflect the best and worst of the humans who built them.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'': The main character, Philip J. Fry, is initially dazzled by the New New York of 3000 A.D. after being frozen for 1,000 years. However, he becomes more blasacute&e about the setting as he finds he still has to do the same things he did back in 1999 like earn money, get a job, find a place to live, and pay taxes.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'': The main character, Philip J. Fry, is initially dazzled by the New New York of 3000 A.D. after being frozen for 1,000 years. However, he becomes more blasacute&e blasé about the setting as he finds he still has to do the same things he did back in 1999 like earn money, get a job, find a place to live, and pay taxes.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'': The main character, Philip J. Fry, is initially dazzled by the New New York of 3000 A.D. after being frozen for 1,000 years. However, he becomes more blase' about the setting as he finds he still has to do the same things he did back in 1999 like earn money, get a job, find a place to live, and pay taxes.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'': The main character, Philip J. Fry, is initially dazzled by the New New York of 3000 A.D. after being frozen for 1,000 years. However, he becomes more blase' blasacute&e about the setting as he finds he still has to do the same things he did back in 1999 like earn money, get a job, find a place to live, and pay taxes.


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[[folder: Web Comic]]Webcomics]]

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* ''Webcomic/CrystalHeroes'' only has ordinary problems despite taking place in a fantasy setting. The characters only go into a dungeon in the first place because it has a library book that the main character needs for her college lit class.


{{Fantasy}} stories set in [[MagicalLand magical lands]], FairyTale kingdoms, worlds of HighFantasy, HeroicFantasy, or [[SugarBowl Sugar Bowls]] and [[ScienceFiction science fiction]] stories set in a CrystalSpiresAndTogas {{Utopia}} or [[Mohs/ScienceInGenreOnly somewhere on the squishier end]] of the MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness seemingly take place in universes far removed from the concerns of reality. Yet despite how fantastic these worlds seem upon first impression, it can turn out that their denizens still spend much of their time dealing with the same ordinary matters (e.g., money, employment, taxes, bureaucracy, politics, legal disputes, potholes in the street, etc.) that people do in RealLife. This is how the Extraordinary World, Ordinary Problems trope works. It can be invoked by anything from a quick joke, a [[{{Parody}} parody]] of fantasy and science fiction tropes, or a complete [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstruction]] of either genre. One way to get the point across is to feature an outsider who's initially in awe of the new setting but soon learns things really aren't much different from the mundane world he or she came from.

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{{Fantasy}} stories set in [[MagicalLand magical lands]], FairyTale kingdoms, worlds of HighFantasy, HeroicFantasy, or [[SugarBowl Sugar Bowls]] and [[ScienceFiction science fiction]] stories set in a CrystalSpiresAndTogas {{Utopia}} or [[Mohs/ScienceInGenreOnly somewhere on the squishier end]] of the MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness seemingly take place in universes far removed from the concerns of reality. Yet despite how fantastic these worlds seem upon first impression, it can turn out that their denizens still spend much of their time dealing with the same ordinary matters (e.g., money, employment, taxes, bureaucracy, politics, legal disputes, lawsuits, potholes in the street, etc.) that people do in RealLife. This is how the Extraordinary World, Ordinary Problems trope works. It can be invoked by anything from a quick joke, a [[{{Parody}} parody]] of fantasy and science fiction tropes, or a complete [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstruction]] of either genre. One way to get the point across is to feature an outsider who's initially in awe of the new setting but soon learns things really aren't much different from the mundane world he or she came from.


* In ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': Alethkar's War of Reckoning against the Parshendi began in retribution for the assassination of their king, but continues because Parshendi lands are a fantastic source of gemstones to fuel the FunctionalMagic of Soulcasting, which produces a [[MundaneUtility vital source of food for the Alethi armies]]. That the competition over harvesting gems is a good source of political capital in the Alethi DeadlyDecadentCourt doesn't help matters either.

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* In ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': Alethkar's War of Reckoning against the Parshendi began in retribution for the assassination of their king, but continues because Parshendi lands are a fantastic source of gemstones to fuel the FunctionalMagic of Soulcasting, which produces a [[MundaneUtility vital source of food for the Alethi armies]]. That the competition over harvesting over-harvesting gems is a good source of political capital in the Alethi DeadlyDecadentCourt doesn't help matters either.



-->It's hard to properly dramatize, say, the domestic effects of Dad's bank overdraft when a giant writhing kraken is levelling the city. This mismatch between the conventional dramatic proprieties and SF's extreme, grotesque, or visionary thematics is known as the "squid on the mantelpiece."

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-->It's hard to properly dramatize, say, the domestic effects of Dad's bank overdraft when a giant writhing kraken is levelling leveling the city. This mismatch between the conventional dramatic proprieties and SF's extreme, grotesque, or visionary thematics is known as the "squid on the mantelpiece."



* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' and its sequel series and spinoffs are all set in a fantasy world which mainly borrows from Eastern cultures where certain people can "bend" elements. However the conflicts in most of the story arcs are often mundane issues which just so happen to take place in such a setting. For example, [[TheEmpire the Fire nation]]'s imperialism in the first series is shown more akin to something like a European nation at the height of colonialism. the Roman empire, or even Imperial Japan, rather than hoards of AlwaysChaoticEvil {{mooks}} marching out of {{Mordor}}.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' and its sequel series and spinoffs are all set in a fantasy world which mainly borrows from Eastern cultures where certain people can "bend" elements. However However, the conflicts in most of the story arcs are often mundane issues which just so happen to take place in such a setting. For example, [[TheEmpire the Fire nation]]'s Nation]]'s imperialism in the first series is shown more akin to something like a European nation at the height of colonialism. colonialism, the Roman empire, Empire, or even Imperial Japan, rather than hoards of AlwaysChaoticEvil {{mooks}} marching out of {{Mordor}}.

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