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* Businesses can enforce dress codes on the customers, but it's usually something along the lines of "must be wearing a shirt, pants, and shoes", which mostly everyone follows anyway. The rule is more for the benefit of other customers so they aren't weirded or grossed out by someone who is too revealing or could be spreading germs around. Nice restaurants can also have dress codes for guests, such as a suit jacket and tie, though this has been downplayed as American dress standards have gotten more casual. What restaurant would want to risk turning away the CEO of a major tech company, after all.

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* Businesses can enforce dress codes on the customers, but it's usually something along the lines of "must be wearing a shirt, pants, and shoes", which mostly everyone follows anyway. The rule is more for the benefit of other customers so they aren't weirded or grossed out by someone who is too revealing or could be spreading germs around. Nice restaurants can also have dress codes for guests, such as a suit jacket and tie, though this has been downplayed as American dress standards have gotten more casual. What restaurant would want to risk turning away the CEO of a major tech company, after all.all?


* Businesses can enforce dress codes on the customers, but it's usually something along the lines of "must be wearing a shirt, pants, and shoes", which mostly everyone follows anyway. The rule is more for the benefit of other customers so they aren't weirded or grossed out by someone who is too revealing or could be spreading germs around.

to:

* Businesses can enforce dress codes on the customers, but it's usually something along the lines of "must be wearing a shirt, pants, and shoes", which mostly everyone follows anyway. The rule is more for the benefit of other customers so they aren't weirded or grossed out by someone who is too revealing or could be spreading germs around. Nice restaurants can also have dress codes for guests, such as a suit jacket and tie, though this has been downplayed as American dress standards have gotten more casual. What restaurant would want to risk turning away the CEO of a major tech company, after all.



* Nice restaurants can also have dress codes for guests, such as a suit jacket and tie.

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* Nice restaurants can also have dress codes for guests, such as a suit jacket and tie.

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* Nightclubs often enforce a dress code to attract a certain clientele, though these codes tend to be vague, such as "dress to impress."
* Nice restaurants can also have dress codes for guests, such as a suit jacket and tie.

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** Recent high profile incidents have hit the headlines with parents and pupils fighting back against arbitrary, archaic and just plain sexist dress codes including:
*** Failing to account for different builds - sanctioning some girls because they are bustier and fill out the same top more than others or the “fingertip” rule on shorts making an identical pair ok on a shorter girl but a violation on a taller one.
*** Reinforcing toxic gender roles by putting the onus on girls to avoid wearing anything too revealing rather than teaching boys to behave respectfully regardless of how girls are dressed and by implication putting boys education above girls in importance.
*** Blatantly sexist double standards in dress code enforcement, usually aimed at girls. For example making girls stretch their arms above their heads and sanctioning them for bare midriff if their top and bottom show a gap even if normally it wouldn’t when boys can walk around in shirts open to the navel.
*** Complete lack of common sense in relation to the temperature and weather and the dress code - either forcing pupils to wear hot and restrictive clothing during hot weather or refusing to let them wear more in the cold.


* In an episode of ''Series/LittlePeopleBigWorld'', the Roloffs are preparing for Molly's middle school graduation. They don't check the dress code right away, and have to scramble to find a new dress for Molly because they didn't immediately check the dress code and realize the straps on her dress were too thin.

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* In an episode of ''Series/LittlePeopleBigWorld'', the Roloffs are preparing for Molly's middle school graduation. They don't check the dress code right away, and have to scramble to find a new dress for Molly because they didn't immediately check the dress code and realize the straps on her dress were too thin.narrow.


* In an episode of ''Series/LittlePeopleBigWorld'', the Roloffs are preparing for Molly's middle school graduation. They don't check the dress code right away, and have to scramble to find a new dress for Molly because they didn't immediately check the dress code and realize she's not allowed to wear spaghetti straps.

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* In an episode of ''Series/LittlePeopleBigWorld'', the Roloffs are preparing for Molly's middle school graduation. They don't check the dress code right away, and have to scramble to find a new dress for Molly because they didn't immediately check the dress code and realize she's not allowed to wear spaghetti straps.the straps on her dress were too thin.

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** Historically, the restrictions were even tighter; it used to be that many courts required counsel to appear in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morning_dress morning dress]]. American courts generally dropped this requirement over the 20th century; however, there are some traces, particularly the tradition where the U.S. Solicitor General and his/her deputies (the lawyers responsible for arguing cases in the Supreme Court for the U.S. government) continue to appear for oral argument in morning dress to this day.

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* ''ComicStrip/ForBetterOrForWorse'': April finds a loophole in her school's uniform dress code when she notes that knee length socks are compulsory, but that it does not specify colour. She proceeds to buy the brightest rainbow striped socks she can find.


* England, circa the 17th century onwards, the length of one's wig determined one's social status in polite society. This still remains with English law: judges wear longer, full wigs than the barristers (lawyers) who wear short, abbreviated ones. Also, judges and Queen's Counsel ([=QCs=] for short, senior barristers who have been formally recognised for their skill; the title becomes King's Counsel when the monarch is male) wear silk robes and stockings in court, while junior barristers wear other materials. This requirement has led to the process of becoming a QC being called "taking silk" and [=QCs=] being referred to as "silks".

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* England, circa the 17th century onwards, the length of one's wig determined one's social status in polite society. This still remains with English law: judges wear longer, full wigs than the barristers (lawyers) who wear short, abbreviated ones.ones--although because nothing is simple in English law or custom, the Court of Appeal wears short wigs and the Supreme Court (formerly the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords) doesn't even wear robes, sitting instead in suits. Also, judges and Queen's Counsel ([=QCs=] for short, senior barristers who have been formally recognised for their skill; the title becomes King's Counsel when the monarch is male) wear silk robes and stockings in court, while junior barristers wear other materials. This requirement has led to the process of becoming a QC being called "taking silk" and [=QCs=] being referred to as "silks".


* England, circa the 16th century onwards, the length of one's wig determined one's social status in polite society. This still remains with English criminal law: judges wear longer, full wigs than the barristers (lawyers) who wear short, abbreviated ones.

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* England, circa the 16th 17th century onwards, the length of one's wig determined one's social status in polite society. This still remains with English criminal law: judges wear longer, full wigs than the barristers (lawyers) who wear short, abbreviated ones.ones. Also, judges and Queen's Counsel ([=QCs=] for short, senior barristers who have been formally recognised for their skill; the title becomes King's Counsel when the monarch is male) wear silk robes and stockings in court, while junior barristers wear other materials. This requirement has led to the process of becoming a QC being called "taking silk" and [=QCs=] being referred to as "silks".


Two of the most common places for dress codes are schools and workplaces, particularly {{office}}s. Schools which enforce dress codes may carve out exceptions, i.e. spirit wear or casual wear allowed as a reward, on birthdays, at regular intervals, or in exchange for a small donation to charity [[note]] and sometimes a combination of the latter two [[/note]]. Workplaces often have "Casual Fridays." (There are still limits, of course, although on many shows the characters will take their sartorial freedom to [[HilarityEnsues hilarious extremes]]).

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Two of the most common places for dress codes are schools and workplaces, particularly {{office}}s.offices. Schools which enforce dress codes may carve out exceptions, i.e. spirit wear or casual wear allowed as a reward, on birthdays, at regular intervals, or in exchange for a small donation to charity [[note]] and sometimes a combination of the latter two [[/note]]. Workplaces often have "Casual Fridays." (There are still limits, of course, although on many shows the characters will take their sartorial freedom to [[HilarityEnsues hilarious extremes]]).


* In season 10 of ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' the school introduces uniforms ''[[SuddenSchoolUniform in the middle of the school year]]'', in response to a number of incidents. A far cry from ''Series/DegrassiJuniorHigh'' where they didn't even have a ''wardrobe'' and the characters' clothes were the actors' odidrealize'Little People, Big World'', the Roloffs are preparing for Molly's middle school graduation. They don't check the dress code right away, and have to scramble to find a new dress for Molly because they didn't immediately check the dress code and realize she's not allowed to wear spaghetti straps.

to:

* In season 10 of ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' the school introduces uniforms ''[[SuddenSchoolUniform in the middle of the school year]]'', in response to a number of incidents. A far cry from ''Series/DegrassiJuniorHigh'' where they didn't even have a ''wardrobe'' and the characters' clothes were the actors' odidrealize'Little People, Big World'', own.
* In an episode of ''Series/LittlePeopleBigWorld'',
the Roloffs are preparing for Molly's middle school graduation. They don't check the dress code right away, and have to scramble to find a new dress for Molly because they didn't immediately check the dress code and realize she's not allowed to wear spaghetti straps.


# To show that a character is going to violate the code, and get in some form of trouble over it.

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# To show that a character [[TheLawOfConservationOfDetail is going to violate the code, and get in some form of trouble over it.
it]].


** Service dogs wear vests which usually say something to the effect of "Don't distract me! I'm working!" When they're not working, they can take the vest off and can basically live as pets.

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** Service dogs wear vests which usually say something to the effect of "Don't distract me! I'm working!" When they're not working, they can take the vest off and can basically live as pets.


** Coaches wear suits, tie optional. Female coaches wear pantsuits.

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** Coaches wear suits, tie optional.suits and ties. Female coaches wear pantsuits.

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