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* A discussion of this trope in the music world can be seen in WebVideo/ToddInTheShadows' series ''[[https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLznZMqdhi_RVHtZYrMeoi3Fjg9VNhPAX Trainwreckords]]'', which discusses albums that, for whatever reason (from poor quality to [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks an unpopular change in sound]] to a TroubledProduction), destroyed the careers of the musicians who made them. Several albums listed on the [[CreatorKiller/Music Music page]] have links to Todd's videos on them.

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* A discussion of this trope in the music world can be seen in WebVideo/ToddInTheShadows' series ''[[https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLznZMqdhi_RVHtZYrMeoi3Fjg9VNhPAX Trainwreckords]]'', which discusses albums that, for whatever reason (from poor quality to [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks an unpopular change in sound]] to a TroubledProduction), destroyed the careers of the musicians who made them. Several albums listed on the [[CreatorKiller/Music [[CreatorKiller/{{Music}} Music page]] have links to Todd's videos on them.


* While a success with fans, Channel Awesome's fourth-anniversary film ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'' essentially dashed any chances of Creator/DougWalker ever directing another movie again. The film's incredibly TroubledProduction took a toll on Doug's health, as he lost an unhealthy amount of weight and reportedly broke down into tears several times from how the film's development was negatively affecting the cast and crew. The controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)[[note]]a bill proposed by Congress to combat copyright infringement on the web that would have resulted in [[GoneHorriblyRight the shutdown of numerous sites and content creators regardless of fair use]].[[/note]] was being debated around the same time and weighed heavily on Doug and his brother Rob. Doug's only film directing credit since was for the ''WebVideo/{{Dragonbored}}'' segment for CA's [[WebVideo/TheUncannyValley next special]], with no others being planned anytime soon.

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* While a success with fans, Channel Awesome's fourth-anniversary film ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'' essentially dashed any chances of Creator/DougWalker ever directing another movie again. The again.
** To start with, the
film's incredibly TroubledProduction took a toll on Doug's health, as he lost an unhealthy amount of weight and reportedly broke down into tears several times from how the film's development was negatively affecting the cast and crew. The controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)[[note]]a bill proposed by Congress to combat copyright infringement on the web that would have resulted in [[GoneHorriblyRight the shutdown of numerous sites and content creators regardless of fair use]].[[/note]] was being debated around the same time and weighed heavily on Doug and his brother Rob.Rob, as they feared that SOPA, if passed, would make it impossible for them to continue making their flagship show ''WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic''. Doug's only film directing credit since was for the ''WebVideo/{{Dragonbored}}'' segment for CA's [[WebVideo/TheUncannyValley next special]], with no others being planned anytime soon.


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* A discussion of this trope in the music world can be seen in WebVideo/ToddInTheShadows' series ''[[https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLznZMqdhi_RVHtZYrMeoi3Fjg9VNhPAX Trainwreckords]]'', which discusses albums that, for whatever reason (from poor quality to [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks an unpopular change in sound]] to a TroubledProduction), destroyed the careers of the musicians who made them. Several albums listed on the [[CreatorKiller/Music Music page]] have links to Todd's videos on them.


** The critical and commercial flop of ''WesternAnimation/StrangeMagic'' was enough justification on Disney's part to give Creator/TouchstonePictures the ax as the studio severed ties with [=DreamWorks=] later that year; that studio went to mend fences with Universal Pictures (which they had dumped for Disney years earlier, after the studio was spun off from Creator/{{Paramount}}) and shift distribution of DW movies to them. The company bowed down with the release of ''The Light Between Oceans'', which was also a BoxOfficeBomb that was released [[DumpMonths in September]].[[note]]Any thought of Disney reviving Touchstone was put down for good when Disney acquired Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox in 2019, rendering the label redundant[[/note]] The failure might also mark the end for Creator/GeorgeLucas' mainstream ventures as apart from a single scene in ''Film/{{Solo}}'' he has no further projects lined up for the foreseeable future.

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** * The critical and commercial flop of ''WesternAnimation/StrangeMagic'' was enough justification on Disney's part to give Creator/TouchstonePictures the ax as the studio severed ties with [=DreamWorks=] later that year; that studio went to mend fences with Universal Pictures (which they had dumped for Disney years earlier, after the studio was spun off from Creator/{{Paramount}}) and shift distribution of DW movies to them. The company bowed down with the release of ''The Light Between Oceans'', which was also a BoxOfficeBomb that was released [[DumpMonths in September]].[[note]]Any thought of Disney reviving Touchstone was put down for good when Disney acquired Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox in 2019, rendering the label redundant[[/note]] The failure might also mark the end for Creator/GeorgeLucas' mainstream ventures as apart from a single scene in ''Film/{{Solo}}'' he has no further projects lined up for the foreseeable future.


* The massive critical failure of ''Old Dogs'' took down the career of director Walt Becker, as Disney went on to cancel his next project (a project with Creator/RobinWilliams titled ''Wedding Banned'') and he has done very little since (outside of being one of the producers of ''Film/{{Zookeeper}}'' and helming ''Film/AlvinAndTheChipmunks: The Road Chip'', which was the lowest-grossing film in the series). The film also managed to be a factor in Disney getting out of films made with adult audiences in mind; as a further consequence, it effectively ended the Touchstone label except to distribute [=DreamWorks=] projects, foreign films, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking films the company doesn't really care about]] (the last in-house productions released by Touchstone were ''Film/YouAgain'' and ''Film/StepUp 3D'', both released in 2010).
** The critical and commercial flop of ''WesternAnimation/StrangeMagic'' was enough justification on Disney's part to give Creator/TouchstonePictures the ax as the studio severed ties with [=DreamWorks=] later that year; that studio went to mend fences with Universal Pictures (which they had dumped for Disney years earlier, after the studio was spun off from Creator/{{Paramount}}) and shift distribution of DW movies to them. The company bowed down with the release of ''The Light Between Oceans'', which was also a BoxOfficeBomb that was released [[DumpMonths in September]][[note]]Any thought of Disney reviving Touchstone was put down for good when Disney acquired Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox in 2019, rendering the label redundant[[/note]]. The failure might also mark the end for Creator/GeorgeLucas' mainstream ventures as apart from a single scene in ''Film/{{Solo}}'' he has no further projects lined up for the foreseeable future.

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* The massive critical failure of ''Old Dogs'' took down the career of director Walt Becker, as Disney went on to cancel his two next project projects (a project with Creator/RobinWilliams titled ''Wedding Banned'') Banned'' and a sequel to his previous film, ''Film/WildHogs'') and he has done very little since (outside of being one of the producers of ''Film/{{Zookeeper}}'' and helming ''Film/AlvinAndTheChipmunks: ''[[Film/AlvinAndTheChipmunks Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip'', Chip]]'', which was the lowest-grossing film in the series). The film also managed to be a factor in Disney getting out of films made with adult audiences in mind; mind for a decade; as a further consequence, it effectively ended the Touchstone label except to distribute [=DreamWorks=] projects, foreign films, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking films the company doesn't really care about]] (the last in-house productions released by Touchstone were ''Film/YouAgain'' and ''Film/StepUp 3D'', ''[[Film/StepUp Step Up 3D]]'', both released in 2010).
** The critical and commercial flop of ''WesternAnimation/StrangeMagic'' was enough justification on Disney's part to give Creator/TouchstonePictures the ax as the studio severed ties with [=DreamWorks=] later that year; that studio went to mend fences with Universal Pictures (which they had dumped for Disney years earlier, after the studio was spun off from Creator/{{Paramount}}) and shift distribution of DW movies to them. The company bowed down with the release of ''The Light Between Oceans'', which was also a BoxOfficeBomb that was released [[DumpMonths in September]][[note]]Any September]].[[note]]Any thought of Disney reviving Touchstone was put down for good when Disney acquired Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox in 2019, rendering the label redundant[[/note]]. redundant[[/note]] The failure might also mark the end for Creator/GeorgeLucas' mainstream ventures as apart from a single scene in ''Film/{{Solo}}'' he has no further projects lined up for the foreseeable future.


* Despite ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters''' success, Creator/DICEntertainment felt the need to hire a child psychologists group called ''Q5'' to help oversee the production of season 2. It was during this time when DIC realized the group had [[CriticalResearchFailure absolutely no evidence to back their research]] as their changes for the show were either hypocritical, nonsensical, or downright [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment seen as bigoted by crew members]]. Needless to say, ''The Real Ghostbusters'' was canceled afterward and Q5 was reportedly never hired again by any studio. [[note]]See Phelous's review [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OW51PDa_puE here]] for more information about the topic.[[/note]]

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* Despite ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters''' success, Creator/DICEntertainment Creator/ABC felt the need to hire a child psychologists group called ''Q5'' to help oversee the production of the second ABC season. (The syndicated season 2. did not have such requirements.) It was during this time when DIC the writers realized the group had [[CriticalResearchFailure absolutely no evidence to back their research]] as their changes for the show were either hypocritical, nonsensical, or downright [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment seen as bigoted by crew members]]. Needless to say, ''The Real Ghostbusters'' was canceled the ratings dropped afterward and Q5 was reportedly never hired again by any studio. [[note]]See Phelous's review [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OW51PDa_puE here]] for more information about the topic.[[/note]]


Compare GenreKiller and FranchiseKiller. [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused]] with AuthorExistenceFailure (though they can overlap if the work's performance is so bad that the creator is DrivenToSuicide or [[DeathByDespair otherwise dies shortly after]]), RageAgainstTheAuthor or TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou, where the creator can be ''literally'' killed by his or her work. See StarDerailingRole when it happens to the performers. See OldShame for an old work which a creator turns against later (or refuses to let see the light of day), but which by itself probably won't destroy their credibility. See ToughActToFollow when one's career was not killed by a flop but the inability to follow-up a massive success. Contrast BreakthroughHit (when the work makes the creator a big name) and CareerResurrection and WinBackTheCrowd (when the work makes the creator a big name again after a Creator Killer). For understandable reasons, many of these overlap with TroubledProduction. If it literally, and directly, kills them, then it's probably an example of FatalMethodActing.

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Compare GenreKiller and FranchiseKiller. [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused]] with AuthorExistenceFailure (though they can overlap if the work's performance is so bad that the creator is DrivenToSuicide or [[DeathByDespair otherwise dies shortly after]]), RageAgainstTheAuthor or TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou, where the creator can be ''literally'' killed by his or her work. See StarDerailingRole when it happens to the performers. See OldShame for an old work which a creator turns against later (or refuses to let see the light of day), but which by itself probably won't destroy their credibility. See ToughActToFollow when one's career was not killed by a flop but the inability to follow-up a massive success. A RoleEndingMisdemeanor is when this trope is caused by [[OvershadowedByControversy personal scandal]] rather than a failed work. Contrast BreakthroughHit (when the work makes the creator a big name) and CareerResurrection and WinBackTheCrowd (when the work makes the creator a big name again after a Creator Killer). For understandable reasons, many of these overlap with TroubledProduction. If it literally, and directly, kills them, then it's probably an example of FatalMethodActing.


[[caption-width-right:350:[-It would be [[Film/{{Split}} a while]] before he could [[https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/split_2017 recover]] from [[Film/TheLastAirbender that bottom one]].-]]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:[-It would be [[Film/{{Split}} a while]] before he could [[https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/split_2017 recover]] from [[Film/TheLastAirbender that bottom last one]].-]]]


* RCA's [[UsefulNotes/{{CED}} SelectaVision]] video system was intended to be a major competitor to [[UsefulNotes/{{VCR}} VHS and Betamax]]. While the format did have some advantages (at the time, [=SelectaVision=] movies were significantly cheaper to ''buy'' than movies on videocassette or UsefulNotes/LaserDisc), it couldn't match [=LaserDisc=] for quality or offer the recording capability of VHS/Beta. The format failed to take off, resulting in RCA writing off the entire investment in the project, and its subsequent breakup and acquisition by General Electric.

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* RCA's [[UsefulNotes/{{CED}} SelectaVision]] video system was intended to be a major competitor to [[UsefulNotes/{{VCR}} VHS and Betamax]]. While the format did have some advantages (at the time, [=SelectaVision=] movies were significantly cheaper to ''buy'' than movies on videocassette or UsefulNotes/LaserDisc), it couldn't match [=LaserDisc=] for quality or offer the recording capability of VHS/Beta. The format failed to take off, resulting in RCA writing off the entire investment in the project, and its subsequent breakup and acquisition by General Electric. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LrPe0rwXOU Video by Techmoan about it here.]]


* After the infamous [[ComicBook/TheCloneSaga Clone Saga]], it was decided that the ''Comicbook/SpiderMan'' titles were to be canceled and relaunched with new "[[ContinuityReboot number ones]]" alongside a miniseries written and drawn by Creator/JohnByrne that would retell Spider-Man's origin. This reboot was notable in that one writer - Howard Mackie - would be looking after both titles. The reboot was heavily promoted with garnered much anticipation amongst fans and critics, with Mackie claiming that they would "fix" the books and make things "fun" again. But things soured after the reboot where Mackie had Spider-Man face off against lackluster villains, engage in weird plots like facing off against vampires, supernatural villains, an alien-infested senator who was set up as the BigBad of his arc, and - most notably - "killed" Mary Jane Watson. Fan and critical reaction was sour, and soon Mackie's plans were outright scuttled - he was replaced on one of the books by Paul Jenkins, and was given just enough time to wrap up his run and bring back Mary Jane before he was pulled from the title and replaced by Creator/JMichaelStraczynski. Mackie's career never recovered from the debacle. In the decade since then, Mackie rarely worked in comics with his last work being a six-issue mini-series that was to serve as a "reinterpretation" of what was to actually have happened in the initial Clone Saga alongside Tom Defalco.

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* After the infamous [[ComicBook/TheCloneSaga Clone Saga]], it was decided that the ''Comicbook/SpiderMan'' titles were to be canceled and relaunched with new "[[ContinuityReboot number ones]]" alongside a miniseries written and drawn by Creator/JohnByrne that would retell Spider-Man's origin. This reboot was notable in that one writer - Howard Mackie - would be looking after both titles. The reboot was heavily promoted with garnered much anticipation amongst fans and critics, with Mackie claiming that they would "fix" the books and make things "fun" again. But things soured after the reboot where Mackie had Spider-Man face off against lackluster villains, engage in weird plots like facing off against vampires, supernatural villains, an alien-infested senator who was set up as the BigBad of his arc, and - most notably - "killed" Mary Jane Watson. Fan and critical reaction was sour, and soon Mackie's plans were outright scuttled - he was replaced on one of the books by Paul Jenkins, Jenkins and was given just enough time to wrap up his run and bring back Mary Jane before he was pulled from the title and replaced by Creator/JMichaelStraczynski. Mackie's career never recovered from the debacle. In the decade since then, Mackie rarely worked in comics with his last work being a six-issue mini-series that was to serve as a "reinterpretation" of what was to actually have happened in the initial Clone Saga alongside Tom Defalco.



* Karl Bollers is most famous for his run on ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog''. Unfortunately, it wasn't well received, and is pretty much the reason why he hasn't done much else.

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* Karl Bollers is most famous for his run on ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog''. Unfortunately, it wasn't well received, received and is pretty much the reason why he hasn't done much else.



* Creator/ArchieComics is effectively a shell of its former self. Once boasting one of the few long-running titles due to Creator/DCComics and Creator/MarvelComics doing reboots every time they turned around (Marvel more than DC), they now boast only one title with double digits with a handful of others with single digits that appear infrequently. What happened? First came the painful lawsuits involving ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'', which saw the title being forced into a ContinuityReboot (though it didn't lose its numbering). Soon after was ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogMegaManWorldsUnite'', which Archie attempted to raise flagging sales on ''ComicBook/MegaMan'' and tried it by buying up rights to other SEGA and Capcom franchises -- doing so cost millions and the story barely recouped the money. Then came "Riverdale Reborn", which saw all of the Archie titles being cancelled and given a ContinuityReboot of their own, forcing them into a failed Kickstarter attempt. Then, they focused on ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'', which proved good, but not the big hit Archie hoped for. Most of their titles are on "hiatuses" and the license to make ''Sonic'' comics is now in the hands of Creator/IDWPublishing.
* ''ComicBook/GetKraven'' brought an abrupt end to Creator/RonZimmerman's career as a comic-book writer, failing so badly that Marvel cancelled it before its final issue was released. He's since gone back to writing and producing for TV.

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* Creator/ArchieComics is effectively a shell of its former self. Once boasting one of the few long-running titles due to Creator/DCComics and Creator/MarvelComics doing reboots every time they turned around (Marvel more than DC), they now boast only one title with double digits with a handful of others with single digits that appear infrequently. What happened? First came the painful lawsuits involving ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'', which saw the title being forced into a ContinuityReboot (though it didn't lose its numbering). Soon after was ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogMegaManWorldsUnite'', which Archie attempted to raise flagging sales on ''ComicBook/MegaMan'' and tried it by buying up rights to other SEGA and Capcom franchises -- doing so cost millions and the story barely recouped the money. Then came "Riverdale Reborn", which saw all of the Archie titles being cancelled canceled and given a ContinuityReboot of their own, forcing them into a failed Kickstarter attempt. Then, they focused on ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'', which proved good, but not the big hit Archie hoped for. Most of their titles are on "hiatuses" and the license to make ''Sonic'' comics is now in the hands of Creator/IDWPublishing.
* ''ComicBook/GetKraven'' brought an abrupt end to Creator/RonZimmerman's career as a comic-book writer, failing so badly that Marvel cancelled canceled it before its final issue was released. He's since gone back to writing and producing for TV.



* During the '80s and '90s, The Sharper Image was a modestly popular electronics company specializing in appliances such as jogging watches. However, the company had its "big break" during the TurnOfTheMillennium, when they created an air purifier called the Ionic Breeze. The purifier became a huge success, thanks to its compact size and the fact that it didn't require frequent filter changes. However, what was believed to be the product that would make them into a household name instead turned out to be what killed them. In 2003, ''Consumer Reports'' published a negative review of the Ionic Breeze, saying that it essentially didn't work as advertised. This resulted in The Sharper Image suing them for unfair testing practices -- a suit that was thrown out of court when they were to unable to actually demonstrate that ''CR''[='=]s claims were in any way incorrect, damning the Ionic Breeze and vindicating ''CR''[='=]s review. The Ionic Breeze's fate was sealed in 2005, when ''CR'' published an article declaring it a potential health hazard thanks to the large amounts of ozone it produced, causing sales to plummet. The Sharper Image quickly dissolved, eventually filing Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in 2008. Today, the company exists strictly as a minor subsidiary of several larger corporations.
* Like The Sharper Image, Creator/{{LJN|Toys}}'s "breakthrough" product ended up being their death knell instead. After impressive licensing deals that brought toys based off properties such as ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats1985'' and ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheTempleOfDoom'', LJN used their new found fame to create a line of water guns called "Entertech". The toys were revolutionary on the fact that they could fire water like an automatic firearm, and even have its water supply come from detachable magazines. Add that to their almost completely realistic look to a real firearm, and it seemed that the brand would turn LJN into a major toy competitor to Creator/{{Hasbro}} and Creator/{{Mattel}}. That dream was never realized, however, as on the peak of Entertech's popularity, it became the center of massive media attention after several high-profile incidents of children playing with the water guns getting shot and killed by police officers who were unable to distinguish the toys with the real thing. Even more shocking were that the toy guns had been commonly used in robberies at banks and retailers. As a result of the controversy surrounding Entertech, LJN's then-parent company MCA sold the toy manufacturer in 1990 to Creator/{{Acclaim}}. Acclaim then shut down LJN's toy division in 1990 to focus more on its video game division (see the "Video Games" section for more).

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* During the '80s and '90s, The Sharper Image was a modestly popular electronics company specializing in appliances such as jogging watches. However, the company had its "big break" during the TurnOfTheMillennium, when they created an air purifier called the Ionic Breeze. The purifier became a huge success, thanks to its compact size and the fact that it didn't require frequent filter changes. However, what was believed to be the product that would make them into a household name instead turned out to be what killed them. In 2003, ''Consumer Reports'' published a negative review of the Ionic Breeze, saying that it essentially didn't work as advertised. This resulted in The Sharper Image suing them for unfair testing practices -- a suit that was thrown out of court when they were to unable to actually demonstrate that ''CR''[='=]s claims were in any way incorrect, damning the Ionic Breeze and vindicating ''CR''[='=]s review. The Ionic Breeze's fate was sealed in 2005, when ''CR'' published an article declaring it a potential health hazard thanks to the large amounts of ozone it had produced, causing sales to plummet. The Sharper Image quickly dissolved, eventually filing Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in 2008. Today, the company exists strictly as a minor subsidiary of several larger corporations.
* Like The Sharper Image, Creator/{{LJN|Toys}}'s "breakthrough" product ended up being their death knell instead. After impressive licensing deals that brought toys based off properties such as ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats1985'' and ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheTempleOfDoom'', LJN used their new found newfound fame to create a line of water guns called "Entertech". The toys were revolutionary on the fact that they could fire water like an automatic firearm, and even have its water supply come from detachable magazines. Add that to their almost completely realistic look to a real firearm, and it seemed that the brand would turn LJN into a major toy competitor to Creator/{{Hasbro}} and Creator/{{Mattel}}. That dream was never realized, however, as on the peak of Entertech's popularity, it became the center of massive media attention after several high-profile incidents of children playing with the water guns getting shot and killed by police officers who were unable to distinguish the toys with the real thing. Even more shocking were that the toy guns had been commonly used in robberies at banks and retailers. As a result of the controversy surrounding Entertech, LJN's then-parent company MCA sold the toy manufacturer in 1990 to Creator/{{Acclaim}}. Acclaim then shut down LJN's toy division in 1990 to focus more on its video game division (see the "Video Games" section for more).



* In 2010, tech company Fusion Garage released their own PC tablet called the [=JooJoo=], meant to compete with the new iPad. They had originally started this project with [=TechCrunch=] founder Michael Arrington but eventually broke off and did the tablet themselves, incurring a lawsuit from Arrington in the process. When the tablet hit store shelves, its ungainly size and weight compared to the coming iPad, along with a battery-life issues and poor lag, ended up making the tablet a failure and unplugged Fusion Garage's business within two years, owing creditors $40 million.

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* In 2010, tech company Fusion Garage released their own PC tablet called the [=JooJoo=], meant to compete with the new iPad. They had originally started this project with [=TechCrunch=] founder Michael Arrington but eventually broke off and did the tablet themselves, incurring a lawsuit from Arrington in the process. When the tablet hit store shelves, its ungainly size and weight compared to the coming iPad, along with a battery-life issues and poor lag, ended up making the tablet a failure and unplugged Fusion Garage's business within two years, owing creditors $40 million.



** The critical and commercial flop of ''WesternAnimation/StrangeMagic'' was enough justification on Disney's part to give Creator/TouchstonePictures the ax as the studio severed ties with [=DreamWorks=] later that year; that studio went to mend fences with Universal Pictures (which they had dumped for Disney years earlier, after the studio was spun off from Creator/{{Paramount}}) and shift distribution of DW movies to them. The company bowed down with the release of ''The Light Between Oceans'', which was also a BoxOfficeBomb that was released [[DumpMonths in September]][[note]]Any thought of Disney reviving Touchstone was put down for good when Disney acquired Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox in 2019, rendering the label redundant[[/note]]. The failure might also mark the end for Creator/GeorgeLucas's mainstream ventures as apart from a single scene in ''Film/{{Solo}}'' he has no further projects lined up for the foreseeable future.

to:

** The critical and commercial flop of ''WesternAnimation/StrangeMagic'' was enough justification on Disney's part to give Creator/TouchstonePictures the ax as the studio severed ties with [=DreamWorks=] later that year; that studio went to mend fences with Universal Pictures (which they had dumped for Disney years earlier, after the studio was spun off from Creator/{{Paramount}}) and shift distribution of DW movies to them. The company bowed down with the release of ''The Light Between Oceans'', which was also a BoxOfficeBomb that was released [[DumpMonths in September]][[note]]Any thought of Disney reviving Touchstone was put down for good when Disney acquired Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox in 2019, rendering the label redundant[[/note]]. The failure might also mark the end for Creator/GeorgeLucas's Creator/GeorgeLucas' mainstream ventures as apart from a single scene in ''Film/{{Solo}}'' he has no further projects lined up for the foreseeable future.



* ''Film/FantasticFour2015'' not only managed to take down so many of the people involved in the movie, but also an '''entire major movie studio''' with them:

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* ''Film/FantasticFour2015'' not only managed to take down so many of the people involved in the movie, movie but also an '''entire major movie studio''' with them:



** It even proved to be Fox's own ''Heaven's Gate''. Keep in mind that the film was Rothman's "parting gift" to Fox (read: it was the last film he greenlit for the studio), which released it years after his departure and never really recovered from its crushing failure despite the success of ''Deadpool'' and the ''X-Men'' films that had been released afterwards. Within three years or so of the film's release, [[https://variety.com/2019/biz/news/disney-fox-deal-complete-1203167374/ Fox got acquired by fellow Big Six studio Disney]], effectively rendering the entire effort [[ShaggyDogStory pointless]] and leaving Hollywood with a less competitve industry than it had before.
*** In an unrelated note, the acquisition also managed to take down Fox's mid-budget label Fox 2000 Pictures, as Disney felt having three Fox-braned labels (the main studio alongside the indie-focused Fox Searchlight) was excessive. The move shocked many in the industry as Disney planned to keep the label around post-merger, as it was responsible for some of Fox's top hits like ''Film/TheThinRedLine'', ''Film/WalkTheLine'', ''Film/TheDevilWearsPrada'' and ''Film/LifeOfPi'', among others.

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** It even proved to be Fox's own ''Heaven's Gate''. Keep in mind that the film was Rothman's "parting gift" to Fox (read: it was the last film he greenlit for the studio), which released it years after his departure and never really recovered from its crushing failure despite the success of ''Deadpool'' and the ''X-Men'' films that had been released afterwards.afterward. Within three years or so of the film's release, [[https://variety.com/2019/biz/news/disney-fox-deal-complete-1203167374/ Fox got acquired by fellow Big Six studio Disney]], effectively rendering the entire effort [[ShaggyDogStory pointless]] and leaving Hollywood with a less competitve competitive industry than it had before.
*** In an unrelated note, the acquisition also managed to take down Fox's mid-budget label Fox 2000 Pictures, as Disney felt having three Fox-braned Fox-branded labels (the main studio alongside the indie-focused Fox Searchlight) was excessive. The move shocked many in the industry as Disney planned to keep the label around post-merger, as it was responsible for some of Fox's top hits like ''Film/TheThinRedLine'', ''Film/WalkTheLine'', ''Film/TheDevilWearsPrada'' and ''Film/LifeOfPi'', among others.



* Media Home Entertainment, one of the four "mini-majors" in the home video industry covering a large library of VHS releases in many diverse genres (alongside sub-labels Hi-Tops Video releasing childrens' titles and Fox Hills Video releasing more special interest oriented videos), collapsed in 1990 when Gerald Ronson, the leader of its parent company Heron Communications, was convicted of securities fraud due to his role in the Guinness share trading fraud in the UK, eventually closing shop in 1993. Most assets of Media Home Entertainment were transferred to Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox.

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* Media Home Entertainment, one of the four "mini-majors" in the home video industry covering a large library of VHS releases in many diverse genres (alongside sub-labels Hi-Tops Video releasing childrens' children's titles and Fox Hills Video releasing more special interest oriented videos), collapsed in 1990 when Gerald Ronson, the leader of its parent company Heron Communications, was convicted of securities fraud due to his role in the Guinness share trading share-trading fraud in the UK, eventually closing shop in 1993. Most assets of Media Home Entertainment were transferred to Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox.



* While Gloria Tesch's works were never well-received, her family self-published three ''Literature/MaradoniaSaga'' books between 2008 and 2010, and they had planned to make more sequels -- the last published book ended on a {{cliffhanger}}. Then they started focusing on TheFilmOfTheBook, which languished in DevelopmentHell for a while and was finally released in 2016. It was so expensive to make that it got the Tesches evicted from their house, and they likely recouped extremely little of the money -- if ''anything at all'' -- as the film was only ever shown in one theater, which they had ''rented out''. The film features a WillReturnCaption, but it didn't even get a DVD release, [[StillbornFranchise let alone a sequel]]. Its failure seems to have killed off not only the ''Maradonia'' series[[note]]As of March 2019: No ''Maradonia'' book has been released since 2010, the ''Maradonia'' websites are down, the ebooks are no longer available for purchase, and the only physical copies on Amazon are used.[[/note]], but Gloria's entire writing "career" -- her website focuses on her modelling, and there's no sign of the "[[{{Vaporware}} soon to be released]]" new fantasy book series she's supposedly completed.

to:

* While Gloria Tesch's works were never well-received, her family self-published three ''Literature/MaradoniaSaga'' books between 2008 and 2010, and they had planned to make more sequels -- the last published book ended on a {{cliffhanger}}. Then they started focusing on TheFilmOfTheBook, which languished in DevelopmentHell for a while and was finally released in 2016. It was so expensive to make that it got the Tesches evicted from their house, and they likely recouped extremely little of the money -- if ''anything at all'' -- as the film was only ever shown in one theater, which they had ''rented out''. The film features a WillReturnCaption, but it didn't even get a DVD release, [[StillbornFranchise let alone a sequel]]. Its failure seems to have killed off not only the ''Maradonia'' series[[note]]As of March 2019: No ''Maradonia'' book has been released since 2010, the ''Maradonia'' websites are down, the ebooks are no longer available for purchase, and the only physical copies on Amazon are used.[[/note]], but Gloria's entire writing "career" -- her website focuses on her modelling, modeling, and there's no sign of the "[[{{Vaporware}} soon to be released]]" new fantasy book series she's supposedly completed.



* GameShow creator and producer Creator/ChuckBarris was riding high in TheSeventies with a stable of bawdy and tacky game shows: ''Series/TheNewlywedGame'', ''Series/TheDatingGame'', ''Series/{{Treasure Hunt|US}}'', and ''Series/TheGongShow'', the last of which he also hosted. But in 1979, he created ''3's a Crowd'', a lurid show that asked questions of a male contestant, then of his wife and secretary, to see which of the two knew him better. The show drew outrage from MoralGuardians and the fallout resulted in its cancellation along with ''Newlywed'', ''Dating'', and ''Gong'' (''Treasure Hunt'' had left the air in 1977; ''Crowd'' is in ''What Were They Thinking? The 100 Dumbest Events in Television History''). A Barris-produced revival of the 1960s game show ''Camouflage'' replaced ''Crowd'' at midseason, and was also cancelled. For the next decade, Barris generally only mounted either syndicated revivals of ''Newlywed'', ''Dating'', and ''Gong'', or shows that didn't make it past the pilot stage. (Notably, there was ''Bamboozled'' in 1986, which got hit by a lawsuit from Creator/MarkGoodson over its resemblance to ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'' and got it canned after the pilot stage.) Sony eventually acquired the rights to his catalog while Barris moved to New York before dying of natural causes in 2017.

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* GameShow creator and producer Creator/ChuckBarris was riding high in TheSeventies with a stable of bawdy and tacky game shows: ''Series/TheNewlywedGame'', ''Series/TheDatingGame'', ''Series/{{Treasure Hunt|US}}'', and ''Series/TheGongShow'', the last of which he also hosted. But in 1979, he created ''3's a Crowd'', a lurid show that asked questions of a male contestant, then of his wife and secretary, to see which of the two knew him better. The show drew outrage from MoralGuardians and the fallout resulted in its cancellation along with ''Newlywed'', ''Dating'', and ''Gong'' (''Treasure Hunt'' had left the air in 1977; ''Crowd'' is in ''What Were They Thinking? The 100 Dumbest Events in Television History''). A Barris-produced revival of the 1960s game show ''Camouflage'' replaced ''Crowd'' at midseason, and was also cancelled.canceled. For the next decade, Barris generally only mounted either syndicated revivals of ''Newlywed'', ''Dating'', and ''Gong'', or shows that didn't make it past the pilot stage. (Notably, there was ''Bamboozled'' in 1986, which got hit by a lawsuit from Creator/MarkGoodson over its resemblance to ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'' and got it canned after the pilot stage.) Sony eventually acquired the rights to his catalog while Barris moved to New York before dying of natural causes in 2017.



* At the end of its fifth season, ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' aired what was clearly intended as its final episode. NBC, however, refused to let their {{cash cow|Franchise}} die, replacing the cast and writers entirely, and hiring the show's talent coordinator Jean Doumanian to replace Lorne Michaels as executive producer (snubbing Creator/AlFranken after network head Fred Silverman took personal offense to Franken's "Limo for the Lame-O" piece and Harry Shearer, who didn't like how Creator/LorneMichaels was running ''SNL'' and wanted to add more experienced comic actors[[note]]most of whom, like Christopher Guest and Billy Crystal, wouldn't work with Shearer until season 10[[/note]]). While Doumanian did have a knack for getting good musical guests and treating the talent right, she was out of her depth for running a comedy show.\\
\\
Though Doumanian claims that she was sabotaged because the mostly male higher-ups at NBC did not feel comfortable having a woman run the show, the TV special ''Lost and Found: SNL in the 1980s'' places the blame of the show's horrid sixth season on Doumanian because of her incompetence and inexperience. She passed up a lot of potentially funny cast members[[note]]Creator/JimCarrey, John Goodman, Creator/PaulReubens, and Robert Townsend being just a few examples -- and Creator/EddieMurphy barely made it on. If not for writer Neil Levy, he too would have been rejected[[/note]], tried to make the sketches more dramatic, had no idea how to make the humor edgy (and when she did try, it ended up being dour, flat, and obvious in an intelligence-insulting way), brought on cast members who weren't seasoned in comedy at all[[note]]save for Eddie Murphy and Joe Piscopo, though Denny Dillon did have some experience in sketch comedy, as she was on a Lorne Michaels-produced Saturday morning kids' show in the late 1970s and Creator/GilbertGottfried did do stand-up before he was hired, but this was years before Gottfried would be known for his loud, obnoxious voice and politically incorrect humor[[/note]], and did nothing to improve the show's quality when the reviews tore her season apart and began to praise ABC's ''Fridays'' as the new sharp, satirical sketch show (until ABC [[ScrewedByTheNetwork screwed the show over]]).\\
\\
After Charles Rocket's "f-word" debacle on the Charlene Tilton-hosted episode, Doumanian was fired (along with most of her cast, except for cast members Creator/EddieMurphy, Joe Piscopo, Denny Dillon, Gail Matthius - though Dillon and Matthius would be fired later - and writer Creator/BrianDoyleMurray). The season lives on as one of the lowest points in the show's peak-and-valley history (seasons 11[[note]]1985-1986[[/note]] and 20[[note]]1994-1995[[/note]] are the only other seasons that have spelled doom for ''SNL''[[note]]Other seasons, like seasons 18, 19, 23, 27, 28, 29, 30, 35, and 39 have been branded as bad, but it's mostly along the lines of being boring and uneven in quality, not "so bad that NBC wants the show canceled"[[/note]], but those seasons have been VindicatedByHistory, as most modern viewers will claim that the Weekend Update segments, done by Creator/DennisMiller and Creator/NormMacDonald respectively, are ActuallyPrettyFunny). It earned an (dis)honorable mention in ''What Were They Thinking? The 100 Dumbest Events in Television History'' and was one of the last straws for NBC regarding Silverman, who was fired for nearly killing the network shortly afterward.

to:

* At the end of its fifth season, ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' aired what was clearly intended as its final episode. NBC, however, refused to let their {{cash cow|Franchise}} die, replacing the cast and writers entirely, and hiring the show's talent coordinator Jean Doumanian to replace Lorne Michaels as executive producer (snubbing Creator/AlFranken after network head Fred Silverman took personal offense to Franken's "Limo for the Lame-O" piece and Harry Shearer, who didn't like how Creator/LorneMichaels was running ''SNL'' and wanted to add more experienced comic actors[[note]]most of whom, like Christopher Guest and Billy Crystal, wouldn't work with Shearer until season 10[[/note]]). While Doumanian did have a knack for getting good musical guests and treating the talent right, she was out of her depth for running a comedy show.\\
\\
show.
**
Though Doumanian claims that she was sabotaged because the mostly male higher-ups at NBC did not feel comfortable having a woman run the show, the TV special ''Lost and Found: SNL in the 1980s'' places the blame of the show's horrid sixth season on Doumanian because of her incompetence and inexperience. She passed up a lot of potentially funny cast members[[note]]Creator/JimCarrey, John Goodman, Creator/PaulReubens, and Robert Townsend being just a few examples -- and Creator/EddieMurphy barely made it on. If not for writer Neil Levy, he too would have been rejected[[/note]], tried to make the sketches more dramatic, had no idea how to make the humor edgy (and when she did try, it ended up being dour, flat, and obvious in an intelligence-insulting way), brought on cast members who weren't seasoned in comedy at all[[note]]save for Eddie Murphy and Joe Piscopo, though Denny Dillon did have some experience in sketch comedy, as she was on a Lorne Michaels-produced Saturday morning kids' show in the late 1970s and Creator/GilbertGottfried did do stand-up before he was hired, but this was years before Gottfried would be known for his loud, obnoxious voice and politically incorrect humor[[/note]], and did nothing to improve the show's quality when the reviews tore her season apart and began to praise ABC's ''Fridays'' as the new sharp, satirical sketch show (until ABC [[ScrewedByTheNetwork screwed the show over]]).\\
\\
over]]).
**
After Charles Rocket's "f-word" debacle on the Charlene Tilton-hosted episode, Doumanian was fired (along with most of her cast, except for cast members Creator/EddieMurphy, Joe Piscopo, Denny Dillon, Gail Matthius - though Dillon and Matthius would be fired later - and writer Creator/BrianDoyleMurray). The season lives on as one of the lowest points in the show's peak-and-valley history (seasons 11[[note]]1985-1986[[/note]] and 20[[note]]1994-1995[[/note]] are the only other seasons that have spelled doom for ''SNL''[[note]]Other seasons, like seasons 18, 19, 23, 27, 28, 29, 30, 35, and 39 have been branded as bad, but it's mostly along the lines of being boring and uneven in quality, not "so bad that NBC wants the show canceled"[[/note]], but those seasons have been VindicatedByHistory, as most modern viewers will claim that the Weekend Update segments, done by Creator/DennisMiller and Creator/NormMacDonald respectively, are ActuallyPrettyFunny). It earned an (dis)honorable mention in ''What Were They Thinking? The 100 Dumbest Events in Television History'' and was one of the last straws for NBC regarding Silverman, who was fired for nearly killing the network shortly afterward.



* Another factor in Silverman's departure from NBC was ''[[Creator/DavidLetterman The David Letterman Show]]''. This was his attempt to usher comedy in a daytime environment dominated by soap operas, game shows, sitcom reruns and syndicated talk shows hosted by Phil Donahue and Creator/MervGriffin. It didn't go over well as the piss-poor ratings proved that daytime television was not yet ready for that sort of thing. Still, Silverman pressed on with it, cutting its run time from 90 minutes to 60 after a few weeks before it was mercifully canned after ''four months'' on the air. Silverman originally axed three modestly performing game shows to make room: ''Series/ChainReaction'', ''Series/HighRollers'' and ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' (''Series/WheelOfFortune'' narrowly avoided this fate as well; it escaped cancellation twice during this span and ''Series/AnotherWorld'' had its run time cut back to make room for the spin-off soap ''Texas''). All things considered, Silverman openly hated game shows, feeling that they were a waste of time and not as entertaining as scripted programming. Never mind that game shows are generally cheaper to produce than scripted programming and might have helped NBC while Silverman nearly ran the network dry (case in point, ''Squares'' still pulled in successful ratings at the time of its cancellation). Averted for Letterman himself, who would move onto a successful career in late night television in 1982.

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* Another factor in Silverman's departure from NBC was ''[[Creator/DavidLetterman The David Letterman Show]]''. This was his attempt to usher comedy in a daytime environment dominated by soap operas, game shows, sitcom reruns and syndicated talk shows hosted by Phil Donahue and Creator/MervGriffin. It didn't go over well as the piss-poor ratings proved that daytime television was not yet ready for that sort of thing. Still, Silverman pressed on with it, cutting its run time from 90 minutes to 60 after a few weeks before it was mercifully canned after ''four months'' on the air. Silverman originally axed three modestly performing game shows to make room: ''Series/ChainReaction'', ''Series/HighRollers'' and ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' (''Series/WheelOfFortune'' narrowly avoided this fate as well; it escaped cancellation twice during this span and ''Series/AnotherWorld'' had its run time cut back to make room for the spin-off soap ''Texas''). All things considered, Silverman openly hated game shows, feeling that they were a waste of time and not as entertaining as scripted programming. Never mind that game shows are generally cheaper to produce than scripted programming and might have helped NBC while Silverman nearly ran the network dry (case in point, ''Squares'' still pulled in successful ratings at the time of its cancellation). Averted for Letterman himself, who would move onto a successful career in late night late-night television in 1982.



* Creator/{{Gottlieb}} was the leader of the business from post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII to the 1980s, upon which it quickly descended into a DorkAge that would eventually kill the company. The early 80s had solid state computer technology become small enough and inexpensive enough to be put into pinball machines--whereas Gottlieb's competitors used solid state systems to create pre-recorded audio, switched from scoring reels to digital displays, hold more complex save data, design more complex rules and playfields, and greatly expand settings and options for the operators, Gottlieb continued to make machines in the pre-solid state style and fall behind. Though Gottlieb's designers eventually incorporated these new elements into their games, the company remained three to four years behind their competitors in technology and game design: For every new standard borne of advancements in technology Gottlieb adopted, [[CantCatchUp the other companies had already created a few more]]. Without a good reason for operators to buy their machines rather than some other company's, Gottlieb went out of business in 1995.

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* Creator/{{Gottlieb}} was the leader of the business from post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII to the 1980s, upon which it quickly descended into a DorkAge that would eventually kill the company. The early 80s had solid state computer technology become small enough and inexpensive enough to be put into pinball machines--whereas Gottlieb's competitors used solid state solid-state systems to create pre-recorded audio, switched from scoring reels to digital displays, hold more complex save data, design more complex rules and playfields, and greatly expand settings and options for the operators, Gottlieb continued to make machines in the pre-solid state style and fall behind. Though Gottlieb's designers eventually incorporated these new elements into their games, the company remained three to four years behind their competitors in technology and game design: For every new standard borne of advancements in technology Gottlieb adopted, [[CantCatchUp the other companies had already created a few more]]. Without a good reason for operators to buy their machines rather than some other company's, Gottlieb went out of business in 1995.



** Robin Cruddace was widely praised for his handling of the 5th edition Imperial Guard book, which saw a once joke-level army being turned into one of the strongest forces on the tabletop, until he got his hands on the Tyranids... and promptly got labeled as a treadhead. It's widely considered by the fandom that Cruddace excels at balancing vehicle-based armies, but when given the Tyranids, the only army in the entire game to not use vehicles in any way or form, his only reaction was to make them bland and passable while ensuring that any real threats to vehicles in the codex were eliminated (the sole exception being the Hive Guards) by raising their prices or reducing their effectiveness. Combined with Matt Ward's "accomplishments" above, this has resulted in GW instead not naming any specific writer on any of their codexes since the 6th edition release of the Tyranids due to the internet backlash that ensues. Remember that Games Workshop is a firm that doesn't '''read''' internet feedback, which should give you an idea of how serious this is.
** Tom Kirby, a former CEO of the company during the 5th-late 7th edition era of 40k and the last two editions of Warhammer Fantasy and the onset of Age of Sigmar, was right up there with Ward and Cruddace in terms of hatred. He infamously declared that he did not care about competitive balance and that Warhammer was suppose to be a casual game, which many took to meaning he simply did not care about rules-writing at all. It didn't help that this was the era where the rules balance took a nose dive (including the infamous "build your army as you like" unbound approach), actually following through with a bunch of legal lawsuits, price hikes, and near-draconian "laws" on the sales of their own miniatures (to this day GW is still the only manufacturer that actually ban third party retailers from advertising ''their own products online''). How bad did it get? The fallout from this managed to cause GW to suffer a 5% annual loss ''for several years in a row''. It got so bad that he eventually had to step down as CEO, with Kevin Rountree replacing him. Coincidentally this change also marked a moment where very well received products (discount sets, the return of specialist games, and the re-introduction of a lot of fan favorites and the online community) came out, so it's unclear whether Rountree managed to undo much of Kirby's mistakes, or if Kirby had implemented them but was oust before they came to light.

to:

** Robin Cruddace was widely praised for his handling of the 5th edition Imperial Guard book, which saw a once joke-level army being turned into one of the strongest forces on the tabletop, tabletop until he got his hands on the Tyranids... and promptly got labeled as a treadhead. It's widely considered by the fandom that Cruddace excels at balancing vehicle-based armies, but when given the Tyranids, the only army in the entire game to not use vehicles in any way or form, his only reaction was to make them bland and passable while ensuring that any real threats to vehicles in the codex were eliminated (the sole exception being the Hive Guards) by raising their prices or reducing their effectiveness. Combined with Matt Ward's "accomplishments" above, this has resulted in GW instead not naming any specific writer on any of their codexes since the 6th edition release of the Tyranids due to the internet backlash that ensues. Remember that Games Workshop is a firm that doesn't '''read''' internet feedback, which should give you an idea of how serious this is.
** Tom Kirby, a former CEO of the company during the 5th-late 7th edition era of 40k and the last two editions of Warhammer Fantasy and the onset of Age of Sigmar, was right up there with Ward and Cruddace in terms of hatred. He infamously declared that he did not care about competitive balance and that Warhammer was suppose to be a casual game, which many took to meaning he simply did not care about rules-writing at all. It didn't help that this was the era where the rules balance took a nose dive (including the infamous "build your army as you like" unbound approach), actually following through with a bunch of legal lawsuits, price hikes, and near-draconian "laws" on the sales of their own miniatures (to this day GW is still the only manufacturer that actually ban third party third-party retailers from advertising ''their own products online''). How bad did it get? The fallout from this managed to cause GW to suffer a 5% annual loss ''for several years in a row''. It got so bad that he eventually had to step down as CEO, with Kevin Rountree replacing him. Coincidentally this change also marked a moment where very well received products (discount sets, the return of specialist games, and the re-introduction of a lot of fan favorites and the online community) came out, so it's unclear whether Rountree managed to undo much of Kirby's mistakes, or if Kirby had implemented them but was oust ousted before they came to light.



** David Shriner's career also tanked when, fresh off the heels of the hit ''Kooza'', he wrote and directed the highly-hyped ''Theatre/BananaShpeel'' -- which was intended as Cirque's first permanent show in New York City. The show was a critical and commercial disaster, annoyed audiences to no end, and caused Cirque's reputation as a whole to nosedive. This show and other weaker Cirque efforts produced over 2008-10 (''Theatre/CrissAngelBelieve'', ''ZAIA'', and ''Theatre/VivaElvis'') were revamped and/or closed down, the next few tours (''TOTEM'', ''Theatre/MichaelJacksonTHEIMMORTALWorldTour'', and ''Amaluna'') pulled in breathtaking numbers, and the company remains prolific.

to:

** David Shriner's career also tanked when, when fresh off the heels of the hit ''Kooza'', he wrote and directed the highly-hyped ''Theatre/BananaShpeel'' -- which was intended as Cirque's first permanent show in New York City. The show was a critical and commercial disaster, annoyed audiences to no end, and caused Cirque's reputation as a whole to nosedive. This show and other weaker Cirque efforts produced over 2008-10 (''Theatre/CrissAngelBelieve'', ''ZAIA'', and ''Theatre/VivaElvis'') were revamped and/or closed down, the next few tours (''TOTEM'', ''Theatre/MichaelJacksonTHEIMMORTALWorldTour'', and ''Amaluna'') pulled in breathtaking numbers, and the company remains prolific.



* Andrew Dobson, also known as Tom Preston, has always been a highly controversial artist for a large number of reasons, but for the most part of his career, had a significant fanbase along with a significant hatedom. Many times, he dealt with this by mocking his critics within his work. However, this did not work out for the better when he released the comic strip named ''BINGO'', where he went into further detail about things that his haters loved to bring up. The reason this backfired horribly at him was because he brought up things that the vast majority of his fanbase was never aware of, leading to them going outside of Website/DeviantArt for answers or to have the ''many'' critics, trolls and detractors provide the info for them. This eventually kickstarted a series of events that made Dobson lose a massive chunk of his fanbase, have dozens of parodies made against him to this day, lose a great amount of respect amongst his peers and being seen in a light comparable to that of [[WebComic/{{Sonichu}} Christian Weston Chandler]] according to many people. As a result, he departed from his Website/DeviantArt site (though not deactivating it) and moving on to other stuff in 2015, though his hatedom still continues to this day.

to:

* Andrew Dobson, also known as Tom Preston, has always been a highly controversial artist for a large number of reasons, but for the most part of his career, had a significant fanbase along with a significant hatedom. Many times, he dealt with this by mocking his critics within his work. However, this did not work out for the better when he released the comic strip named ''BINGO'', where he went into further detail about things that his haters loved to bring up. The reason this backfired horribly at him was because that he brought up things that the vast majority of his fanbase was never aware of, leading to them going outside of Website/DeviantArt for answers or to have the ''many'' critics, trolls and detractors provide the info for them. This eventually kickstarted a series of events that made Dobson lose a massive chunk of his fanbase, have dozens of parodies made against him to this day, lose a great amount of respect amongst his peers and being seen in a light comparable to that of [[WebComic/{{Sonichu}} Christian Weston Chandler]] according to many people. As a result, he departed from his Website/DeviantArt site (though not deactivating it) and moving on to other stuff in 2015, though his hatedom still continues to this day.



* One of the first Website/YouTube gaming channels, Gamelife, came crashing down on April 17th, 2007 when their frontman, Andrew Rosenblum, was arrested for threatening to shoot up his ex-girlfriend's school ''the day after the Virginia Tech Massacre''. Sponsors quickly withdrew any connection to the channel, and even a prospective gaming show on television was cancelled, leading to a quick death of Gamelife.

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* One of the first Website/YouTube gaming channels, Gamelife, came crashing down on April 17th, 2007 when their frontman, Andrew Rosenblum, was arrested for threatening to shoot up his ex-girlfriend's school ''the day after the Virginia Tech Massacre''. Sponsors quickly withdrew any connection to the channel, and even a prospective gaming show on television was cancelled, canceled, leading to a quick death of Gamelife.



* While a success with fans, Channel Awesome's fourth anniversary film ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'' essentially dashed any chances of Creator/DougWalker ever directing another movie again. The film's incredibly TroubledProduction took a toll on Doug's health, as he lost an unhealthy amount of weight and reportedly broke down into tears several times from how the film's development was negatively affecting the cast and crew. The controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)[[note]]a bill proposed by Congress to combat copyright infringement on the web that would have resulted in [[GoneHorriblyRight the shutdown of numerous sites and content creators regardless of fair use]].[[/note]] was being debated around the same time and weighed heavily on Doug and his brother Rob. Doug's only film directing credit since was for the ''WebVideo/{{Dragonbored}}'' segment for CA's [[WebVideo/TheUncannyValley next special]], with no others being planned anytime soon.

to:

* While a success with fans, Channel Awesome's fourth anniversary fourth-anniversary film ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'' essentially dashed any chances of Creator/DougWalker ever directing another movie again. The film's incredibly TroubledProduction took a toll on Doug's health, as he lost an unhealthy amount of weight and reportedly broke down into tears several times from how the film's development was negatively affecting the cast and crew. The controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)[[note]]a bill proposed by Congress to combat copyright infringement on the web that would have resulted in [[GoneHorriblyRight the shutdown of numerous sites and content creators regardless of fair use]].[[/note]] was being debated around the same time and weighed heavily on Doug and his brother Rob. Doug's only film directing credit since was for the ''WebVideo/{{Dragonbored}}'' segment for CA's [[WebVideo/TheUncannyValley next special]], with no others being planned anytime soon.



** Relatedly, the one-two-three punch of ''Adult Party Cartoon'', ''WesternAnimation/GaryTheRat'', and ''WesternAnimation/{{Stripperella}}'' resulted in Creator/SpikeTV giving up on any semblance of an animation block less than a year into its existence. (''Stripperella'' was brought down mainly due to a lawsuit filed against a stripper who claimed that Creator/StanLee stole the show's idea from her; unlike the other two shows, it was fairly well-received by critics and fans, and became enough of a CultClassic to warrant a DVD release.)

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** Relatedly, the one-two-three punch of ''Adult Party Cartoon'', ''WesternAnimation/GaryTheRat'', and ''WesternAnimation/{{Stripperella}}'' resulted in Creator/SpikeTV giving up on any semblance of an animation block less than a year into its existence. (''Stripperella'' was brought down mainly due to a lawsuit filed against a stripper who claimed that Creator/StanLee stole the show's idea from her; unlike the other two shows, it was fairly well-received by critics and fans, fans and became enough of a CultClassic to warrant a DVD release.)



** The same goes for the cast and crew, as none of them have done anything noteworthy following its cancellation[[note]]With the exception of co-creator Jesse Hernandez and theme composer NUMP[[/note]]. In fact a few of them ended up quitting the TV industry to pursue other careers.
* Despite ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters''' success, Creator/DICEntertainment felt the need to hire a child psychologists group called ''Q5'' to help oversee the production of season 2. It was during this time when DIC realized the group had [[CriticalResearchFailure absolutely no evidence to back their research]] as their changes for the show were either hypocritical, nonsensical, or downright [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment seen as bigoted by crew members]]. Needless to say, ''The Real Ghostbusters'' was canceled afterwards and Q5 was reportedly never hired again by any studio. [[note]]See Phelous's review [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OW51PDa_puE here]] for more information about the topic.[[/note]]

to:

** The same goes for the cast and crew, as none of them have done anything noteworthy following its cancellation[[note]]With the exception of co-creator Jesse Hernandez and theme composer NUMP[[/note]]. In fact fact, a few of them ended up quitting the TV industry to pursue other careers.
* Despite ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters''' success, Creator/DICEntertainment felt the need to hire a child psychologists group called ''Q5'' to help oversee the production of season 2. It was during this time when DIC realized the group had [[CriticalResearchFailure absolutely no evidence to back their research]] as their changes for the show were either hypocritical, nonsensical, or downright [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment seen as bigoted by crew members]]. Needless to say, ''The Real Ghostbusters'' was canceled afterwards afterward and Q5 was reportedly never hired again by any studio. [[note]]See Phelous's review [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OW51PDa_puE here]] for more information about the topic.[[/note]]



* Can an entire company be killed off by a commercial? If so, Just for Feet certainly fits the bill. In 1999, the fast-growing shoe retailer produced an ad for the UsefulNotes/SuperBowl, which depicted hunters driving a Humvee in the African desert...who turn out to be targeting [[UnfortunateImplications a barefoot Kenyan runner]]. The hunters give the runner a cup of drugged water and then put a pair of shoes on his feet while he's unconscious. [[OvershadowedByControversy It made their name more noticed, alright]]; the company was ''massively'' criticized for the ad's racist undertones, and its failure put a giant fork in the road for their future. The next year, the company filed for bankruptcy before subsequently collapsing.

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* Can an entire company be killed off by a commercial? If so, Just for Feet certainly fits the bill. In 1999, the fast-growing shoe retailer produced an ad for the UsefulNotes/SuperBowl, which depicted hunters driving a Humvee in the African desert...who turn turned out to be targeting [[UnfortunateImplications a barefoot Kenyan runner]]. The hunters give the runner a cup of drugged water and then put a pair of shoes on his feet while he's unconscious. [[OvershadowedByControversy It made their name more noticed, alright]]; the company was ''massively'' criticized for the ad's racist undertones, and its failure put a giant fork in the road for their future. The next year, the company filed for bankruptcy before subsequently collapsing.


* On March 27, 2011, Creator/FourKidsEntertainment was sued by Creator/TVTokyo and Nihon Ad Systems over unpaid royalties to their CashCowFranchise, ''[[Anime/YuGiOh Yu-Gi-Oh!]]'', and shut down a week later, already damaged by the financial loss of their ''[[Anime/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]]'' license. A year after filing for bankruptcy, [=4Kids=] reincorporated itself as [=4Licensing=] Corporation, sold most of their licenses to Creator/SabanBrands, and their production facilities to Creator/{{Konami}}.

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* On March 27, 2011, Creator/FourKidsEntertainment was sued by Creator/TVTokyo and Nihon Ad Systems over unpaid royalties to their CashCowFranchise, ''[[Anime/YuGiOh Yu-Gi-Oh!]]'', and shut down a week later, already damaged by the financial loss of their ''[[Anime/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]]'' license. A year after filing for bankruptcy, [=4Kids=] reincorporated itself as [=4Licensing=] Corporation, sold most of their licenses to Creator/SabanBrands, and their production facilities to Creator/{{Konami}}. [=4Licensing=] eventually closed up shop in February 2017 after filing for bankruptcy yet again.



* Crash Media Group was launched in 1997 with the intention of releasing [=DVDs=]. They would go on to license and release over 200 live-action films. Forming an alliance with the animation studio Abrams Gentile Entertainment, Crash Media would license animated titles. Kimio Ikeda proposed a concept of a car-racing anime called ''Shiden'', but despite making a pilot episode, [[AuthorExistenceFailure Ikeda died before a full series could be produced]]. In 2004, Crash Media snapped up the license to the first 13 episodes of the anime series ''Geisters - Fractions of the Earth'', with Creator/CentralParkMedia distributing. Unfortunately, the show was met with a mixed response, Crash's licensor to the series was shut down, and Crash Media left the anime industry. Crash closed up shop in 2007 after a lawsuit regarding their release of the Samurai Trilogy films starring Creator/ToshiroMifune without Criterion's knowledge, unsuccessful distribution deals with Koch Distribution and Inspired Corporation, as well as low sales and returns.
* Despite being a successful anime licensor, Creator/CentralParkMedia laid off several of its employees in 2006 due to financial problems resulting from the Musicland group going bankrupt that year. CPM eventually ceased operations in April 2009 after filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

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* Crash Media Group was launched in 1997 with the intention of releasing [=DVDs=]. They would go on to license and release over 200 live-action films. Forming an alliance with the animation studio Abrams Gentile Entertainment, Crash Media would license animated titles. Kimio Ikeda proposed a concept of a car-racing anime called ''Shiden'', but despite making a pilot episode, [[AuthorExistenceFailure Ikeda died before a full series could be produced]]. In 2004, Crash Media snapped up the license to the first 13 episodes of the anime series ''Geisters - Fractions of the Earth'', with Creator/CentralParkMedia distributing. Unfortunately, the show was met with a mixed response, Crash's licensor to the series was shut down, and Crash Media left the anime industry. Crash closed up shop shut down for good in 2007 after a lawsuit regarding their release of the Samurai Trilogy films starring Creator/ToshiroMifune without Criterion's knowledge, unsuccessful distribution deals with Koch Distribution and Inspired Corporation, as well as low sales and returns.
sales.
* Despite being a successful anime licensor, Creator/CentralParkMedia laid off several of its employees in 2006 due to financial problems resulting from the Musicland group going bankrupt that year. CPM eventually ceased operations closed its doors in April 2009 after filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.


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* Despite lasting for two seasons with positive reception, ''WesternAnimation/SkysurferStrikeForce'' wasn't the success that Creator/RubySpears needed to keep themselves afloat from the financial problems stemming from their departure from Taft Broadcasting in 1991.[[note]] Taft had filed for bankruptcy that year and put up RS and Creator/HannaBarbera for sale, with Turner Broadcast buying up HB entirely while only taking the pre-1991 RS library; leaving RS to fend for themselves.[[/note]] Ruby Spears would end up closing their doors in 1996 shortly after Skysurfer's cancellation.
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* ''Film/FantasticFour2015'' not only managed to take down so many of the people involved in the movie, but also an '''entire major movie studio''' with it:

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* ''Film/FantasticFour2015'' not only managed to take down so many of the people involved in the movie, but also an '''entire major movie studio''' with it:them:


* ''Film/FantasticFour2015'':

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* ''Film/FantasticFour2015'':''Film/FantasticFour2015'' not only managed to take down so many of the people involved in the movie, but also an '''entire major movie studio''' with it:



** It even proved to be Fox's own ''Heaven's Gate''. Keep in mind that the film was Rothman's "parting gift" to Fox (read: it was the last film he greenlit for the studio), which released it years after his departure and never really recovered from its crushing failure despite the success of ''Deadpool'' and the ''X-Men'' films that had been released afterwards. Within three years or so of the film's release, [[https://variety.com/2019/biz/news/disney-fox-deal-complete-1203167374/ Fox got acquired by fellow Big Six studio Disney]].

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** It even proved to be Fox's own ''Heaven's Gate''. Keep in mind that the film was Rothman's "parting gift" to Fox (read: it was the last film he greenlit for the studio), which released it years after his departure and never really recovered from its crushing failure despite the success of ''Deadpool'' and the ''X-Men'' films that had been released afterwards. Within three years or so of the film's release, [[https://variety.com/2019/biz/news/disney-fox-deal-complete-1203167374/ Fox got acquired by fellow Big Six studio Disney]].Disney]], effectively rendering the entire effort [[ShaggyDogStory pointless]] and leaving Hollywood with a less competitve industry than it had before.
*** In an unrelated note, the acquisition also managed to take down Fox's mid-budget label Fox 2000 Pictures, as Disney felt having three Fox-braned labels (the main studio alongside the indie-focused Fox Searchlight) was excessive. The move shocked many in the industry as Disney planned to keep the label around post-merger, as it was responsible for some of Fox's top hits like ''Film/TheThinRedLine'', ''Film/WalkTheLine'', ''Film/TheDevilWearsPrada'' and ''Film/LifeOfPi'', among others.


** It might even prove to be Fox's own ''Heaven's Gate''. Keep in mind that the film was Rothman's "parting gift" to Fox (read: it was the last film he greenlit for the studio), which released it years after his departure and never really recovered from its crushing failure despite the success of ''Deadpool'' and the ''X-Men'' films that had been released afterwards. Within three years or so of the film's release, Fox is expected to merge with fellow Big Six studio Disney.

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** It might even prove proved to be Fox's own ''Heaven's Gate''. Keep in mind that the film was Rothman's "parting gift" to Fox (read: it was the last film he greenlit for the studio), which released it years after his departure and never really recovered from its crushing failure despite the success of ''Deadpool'' and the ''X-Men'' films that had been released afterwards. Within three years or so of the film's release, [[https://variety.com/2019/biz/news/disney-fox-deal-complete-1203167374/ Fox is expected to merge with got acquired by fellow Big Six studio Disney.Disney]].

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[[folder:Literature]]
* While Gloria Tesch's works were never well-received, her family self-published three ''Literature/MaradoniaSaga'' books between 2008 and 2010, and they had planned to make more sequels -- the last published book ended on a {{cliffhanger}}. Then they started focusing on TheFilmOfTheBook, which languished in DevelopmentHell for a while and was finally released in 2016. It was so expensive to make that it got the Tesches evicted from their house, and they likely recouped extremely little of the money -- if ''anything at all'' -- as the film was only ever shown in one theater, which they had ''rented out''. The film features a WillReturnCaption, but it didn't even get a DVD release, [[StillbornFranchise let alone a sequel]]. Its failure seems to have killed off not only the ''Maradonia'' series[[note]]As of March 2019: No ''Maradonia'' book has been released since 2010, the ''Maradonia'' websites are down, the ebooks are no longer available for purchase, and the only physical copies on Amazon are used.[[/note]], but Gloria's entire writing "career" -- her website focuses on her modelling, and there's no sign of the "[[{{Vaporware}} soon to be released]]" new fantasy book series she's supposedly completed.
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