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* BloodlessCarnage: Removing [[Gorn blood and gore]] altogether from battles and otherwise violent scenes, even though they would realistically involve significant damage to the living entities involved.

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* BloodlessCarnage: Removing [[Gorn [[{{Gorn}} blood and gore]] altogether from battles and otherwise violent scenes, even though if they would realistically involve significant do serious damage to the living entities involved.involved if they were to occur in real life.

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* BloodlessCarnage: Removing [[Gorn blood and gore]] altogether from battles and otherwise violent scenes, even though they would realistically involve significant damage to the living entities involved.


* Bowdlerise/ComicStrips



* Bowdlerise/NewspaperComics


* Bowdlerise/{{Theater}}

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* Bowdlerise/{{Theater}}Bowdlerise/{{Theatre}}


To Bowdlerise[[labelnote:Pronunciation]]"Bow" (as in "port bow" or "cow" minus c) plus "dler" (as in Film/SchindlersList) plus "ise" (pronounced like eyes). Alternatively, those who know IPA: /ˈbaʊd.lə.ˌɹaɪz/.[[/labelnote]] means to alter existing programs, plays, etc. so they are less rude and/or offensive. Commonly, this takes the form of swapping "curse" words for [[GoshDangItToHeck euphemisms.]] The term is used in a negative sense, by those who think the alterations are often done with a ridiculously high [[OurLawyersAdvisedThisTrope fear of lawsuits]] and/or [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad need for political correctness]]. Sometimes it's understandable--different countries have different standards, and sometimes all it takes to change a show from something for teens to suitable for kids is the removal of a few swear words, darn it. Others are fairly reasonable for broadcast (editing out blood splatter, the careful clipping of a scene where a character is riddled by bullet holes).

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To Bowdlerise[[labelnote:Pronunciation]]"Bow" (as in "port bow" or "cow" minus c) plus "dler" (as in Film/SchindlersList) ''Film/SchindlersList'') plus "ise" (pronounced like eyes). Alternatively, those who know IPA: /ˈbaʊd.lə.ˌɹaɪz/.[[/labelnote]] means to alter existing programs, plays, etc. so they are less rude and/or offensive. Commonly, this takes the form of swapping "curse" words for [[GoshDangItToHeck euphemisms.]] The term is used in a negative sense, by those who think the alterations are often done with a ridiculously high [[OurLawyersAdvisedThisTrope fear of lawsuits]] and/or [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad need for political correctness]]. Sometimes it's understandable--different countries have different standards, and sometimes all it takes to change a show from something for teens to suitable for kids is the removal of a few swear words, darn it. Others are fairly reasonable for broadcast (editing out blood splatter, the careful clipping of a scene where a character is riddled by bullet holes).

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[[folder:Asian Animation]]
* ''Animation/PleasantGoatAndBigBigWolf: Mighty Little Defenders'' was edited by Creator/CreativePowerEntertaining at the request of the National Radio and Television Administration so that the fighting scenes would be more suitable for kids. The Administration also forced CPE to change some of the weapons.
[[/folder]]

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* TheBodyPartsThatMustNotBeNamed: Resorting to euphemisms to avoid any of the common words for, uh, the bathing suit area.


* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This involves the removal of what [[{{Macekre}} Carl Macek]] called "ethnic gesture". It might be as subtle as obscuring onscreen kanji characters or changing the names of people and places. The story may also be said to be set in an ambiguous location that is never named but clearly everyone speaks English. Taken to extremes, the dubbed script is filled with American pop culture references that were not in the original. Scenes of uniquely Japanese (or at least Eastern) conventions are edited out such as Shinto temples, eating of traditional Japanese food such as ramen and sushi, Pachinko parlors, the board games Shoji and Go, or the Tokyo tower.

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* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This involves the removal ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange: Sanitizing a work created in a foreign country of what [[{{Macekre}} Carl Macek]] called "ethnic gesture". It might be as subtle as obscuring onscreen kanji characters or changing the names of people any and places. The story may also be said to be set in an ambiguous location that is never named but clearly everyone speaks English. Taken to extremes, the dubbed script is filled with American pop culture all references that were not in to its country of origin, with references to the original. Scenes of uniquely Japanese (or at least Eastern) conventions are edited out such as Shinto temples, eating of traditional Japanese food such as ramen and sushi, Pachinko parlors, the board games Shoji and Go, or the Tokyo tower.
destination country shoehorned into their place.


* The German version of ''Space Crusade'', the simplified Warhammer40K offshoot, greatly stressed how humanitarian the Imperium was and rebranded all their ordnance as non-lethal weaponry (giving them nonsensical names in the process) that merely paralyzed or otherwise incapacitated enemies instead of outright killing them. This was done to appease the MoralGuardians who didn't want to see violent concent in what was considered a children's game (and who presumably would have gotten a stroke had they read what Warhammer40K ''actually'' was like). However, it has to be said that if one ignored the part from the manual that didn't refer to the rules and stats, it was otherwise indistinguishable from the normal game.

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* The German version of ''Space Crusade'', the simplified Warhammer40K Tabletopgame/Warhammer40K offshoot, greatly stressed how humanitarian the Imperium was and rebranded all their ordnance as non-lethal weaponry (giving them nonsensical names in the process) that merely paralyzed or otherwise incapacitated enemies instead of outright killing them. This was done to appease the MoralGuardians who didn't want to see violent concent in what was considered a children's game (and who presumably would have gotten a stroke had they read what Warhammer40K Tabletopgame/Warhammer40K ''actually'' was like). However, it has to be said that if one ignored the part from the manual that didn't refer to the rules and stats, it was otherwise indistinguishable from the normal game.

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* The Museum of Reading in England has a replica of the Bayeux Tapestry on display. It was created using a drawing of the original as a guide. However, the drawing put shorts on a figure who was originally naked, so the replica does too.


* Bowdlerise/WebComics

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[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* The German version of ''Space Crusade'', the simplified Warhammer40K offshoot, greatly stressed how humanitarian the Imperium was and rebranded all their ordnance as non-lethal weaponry (giving them nonsensical names in the process) that merely paralyzed or otherwise incapacitated enemies instead of outright killing them. This was done to appease the MoralGuardians who didn't want to see violent concent in what was considered a children's game (and who presumably would have gotten a stroke had they read what Warhammer40K ''actually'' was like). However, it has to be said that if one ignored the part from the manual that didn't refer to the rules and stats, it was otherwise indistinguishable from the normal game.
[[/folder]]


* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This involves the removal of what [[Macekre CarlMacek]] called "ethnic gesture". It might be as subtle as obscuring onscreen kanji characters or changing the names of people and places. The story may also be said to be set in an ambiguous location that is never named but clearly everyone speaks English. Taken to extremes, the dubbed script is filled with American pop culture references that were not in the original. Scenes of uniquely Japanese (or at least Eastern) conventions are edited out such as Shinto temples, eating of traditional Japanese food such as ramen and sushi, Pachinko parlors, the board games Shoji and Go, or the Tokyo tower.

to:

* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This involves the removal of what [[Macekre CarlMacek]] [[{{Macekre}} Carl Macek]] called "ethnic gesture". It might be as subtle as obscuring onscreen kanji characters or changing the names of people and places. The story may also be said to be set in an ambiguous location that is never named but clearly everyone speaks English. Taken to extremes, the dubbed script is filled with American pop culture references that were not in the original. Scenes of uniquely Japanese (or at least Eastern) conventions are edited out such as Shinto temples, eating of traditional Japanese food such as ramen and sushi, Pachinko parlors, the board games Shoji and Go, or the Tokyo tower.


* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This involves the removal of what CarlMacek called "ethnic gesture". It might be as subtle as obscuring onscreen kanji characters or changing the names of people and places. The story may also be said to be set in an ambiguous location that is never named but clearly everyone speaks English. Taken to extremes, the dubbed script is filled with American pop culture references that were not in the original. Scenes of uniquely Japanese (or at least Eastern) conventions are edited out such as Shinto temples, eating of traditional Japanese food such as ramen and sushi, Pachinko parlors, the board games Shoji and Go, or the Tokyo tower.

to:

* WeAllLiveInAmerica: This involves the removal of what CarlMacek [[Macekre CarlMacek]] called "ethnic gesture". It might be as subtle as obscuring onscreen kanji characters or changing the names of people and places. The story may also be said to be set in an ambiguous location that is never named but clearly everyone speaks English. Taken to extremes, the dubbed script is filled with American pop culture references that were not in the original. Scenes of uniquely Japanese (or at least Eastern) conventions are edited out such as Shinto temples, eating of traditional Japanese food such as ramen and sushi, Pachinko parlors, the board games Shoji and Go, or the Tokyo tower.

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