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* The messages left in ''WebVideo/NOCPlus10'' appear to be coming from a sentient machine, trapped in a research station under the sea.


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* In ''Webcomic/LeavingTheCradle'' AIs are a part of the society, their most influential job to be revealed so far is xenolinguistics, they decypher new alien languages much more quicker than it would take for an organic team.[[/folder]]


** In ''VideoGame/AceCombat7SkiesUnknown'', the drone army that Erusea uses against Osea is controlled by an [=AI=] that is at first programmed with basic instructions and limited adaptability. Dr. Schroeder was brought in to collect flight and neurological data from the retired Erusean Ace Mihaly, to further improve the drones when they started taking massive casualties. [[spoiler: Its eventually revealed that the [=AI=] was a resurrection of the [=Z.O.E.=] project, and that Schroeder had been improving the [=AI=] to avenge his homeland of Belka. The FinalBoss are two [=UAVs=] named Hugin and Munin, [[AIIsACrapshoot who prove to be]] [[ItCanThink far smarter than]] [[GoneHorriblyRight anyone had anticipated]], and they try to spark a [[Franchise/TheTerminator Skynet-like]] [[RobotWar revolution]] on humanity.

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** In ''VideoGame/AceCombat7SkiesUnknown'', the drone army that Erusea uses against Osea is controlled by an [=AI=] that is at first programmed with basic instructions and limited adaptability. Dr. Schroeder was brought in to collect flight and neurological data from the retired Erusean Ace Mihaly, to further improve the drones when they started taking massive casualties. [[spoiler: Its eventually revealed that the [=AI=] was a resurrection of the [=Z.O.E.=] project, and that Schroeder had been improving the [=AI=] to avenge his homeland of Belka. The FinalBoss are two [=UAVs=] named Hugin and Munin, [[AIIsACrapshoot who prove to be]] [[ItCanThink far smarter than]] [[GoneHorriblyRight anyone had anticipated]], and they try to spark a [[Franchise/TheTerminator Skynet-like]] [[RobotWar revolution]] on humanity.]]

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* ''VideoGame/AceCombat''
** In ''VideoGame/AceCombatAssaultHorizonLegacy'', a remake of ''VideoGame/AceCombat2'', the [=Z.O.E.=] is heavily implied to be an artificial intelligence, that was created by the vengeful elements of [[VideoGame/AceCombatZeroTheBelkanWar Belka]].
** The OmegaEnding to ''VideoGame/AceCombat3Electrosphere'' [[spoiler: reveals that ''the PlayerCharacter'', Nemo, is an artificial intelligence. Simon Orestes Cohen had created it to kill an [[BrainUploading [=AI=] version]] of Abyssal Dision, because he blamed him for the death of Yoko Martha Inoue.]]
** In ''VideoGame/AceCombat7SkiesUnknown'', the drone army that Erusea uses against Osea is controlled by an [=AI=] that is at first programmed with basic instructions and limited adaptability. Dr. Schroeder was brought in to collect flight and neurological data from the retired Erusean Ace Mihaly, to further improve the drones when they started taking massive casualties. [[spoiler: Its eventually revealed that the [=AI=] was a resurrection of the [=Z.O.E.=] project, and that Schroeder had been improving the [=AI=] to avenge his homeland of Belka. The FinalBoss are two [=UAVs=] named Hugin and Munin, [[AIIsACrapshoot who prove to be]] [[ItCanThink far smarter than]] [[GoneHorriblyRight anyone had anticipated]], and they try to spark a [[Franchise/TheTerminator Skynet-like]] [[RobotWar revolution]] on humanity.


On the other hand, we're not surprised by AI that [[BenevolentAI never rebel at all and remain completely friendly to organics]].

In the real world, "Artificial Intelligence" refers to programming methods which allow software systems to (very loosely) imitate the reasoning processes of human experts in areas like medical diagnosis, economic prediction, or stock-market manipulation. People who build such systems are more likely to use terms like "deep neural networks" or "recurrent neural networks" than "artificial intelligence" The computer-generated responses in VideoGames are referred to as [[VideoGameAI AIs]], despite the fact that these programs aren't actually trying to emulate human thought. See UsefulNotes/VideoGameAI for more details.

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On the other hand, we're not surprised by AI that [[BenevolentAI never rebel at all and remain completely friendly to organics]].

In the real world, "Artificial Intelligence" refers to programming methods which allow software systems to (very loosely) imitate the reasoning processes of human experts in areas like medical diagnosis, economic prediction, or stock-market manipulation. People who build such systems are more likely to use terms like "deep neural networks" or "recurrent neural networks" than "artificial intelligence" intelligence". The computer-generated responses in VideoGames are referred to as [[VideoGameAI AIs]], despite the fact that these programs aren't actually trying to emulate human thought. See UsefulNotes/VideoGameAI for more details.


In fiction, this tends to have an unfortunate habit of [[AIIsACrapshoot going haywire]] and trying to wipe out the human race, for any reason or none. Most early science fiction authors who dealt with the subject assumed this predilection for genocide was an innate property of ''any'' artificial-intelligence system. This may be in part because most early science fiction authors had not the slightest clue about computer science or technology; it's always easier to fear what you don't understand, especially when it's eight feet tall, has to have a specially air-conditioned room all its own, and is tended by a [[AveMachina cult of human acolytes]] who see to its every need.

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In fiction, this This tends to have an unfortunate habit of [[AIIsACrapshoot going haywire]] and trying to wipe out the human race, for any reason or none. Most early science fiction authors who dealt with the subject assumed this predilection for genocide was an innate property of ''any'' artificial-intelligence system. This may be in part because most early science fiction authors had not the slightest clue about computer science or technology; it's always easier to fear what you don't understand, especially when it's eight feet tall, has to have a specially air-conditioned room all its own, and is tended by a [[AveMachina cult of human acolytes]] who see to its every need.



As the popular conception of computers evolved from intimidatingly enormous and unsympathetic mainframes to the small, useful, blazing-fast {{PC}}s ubiquitous today, so too did the popular conception of artificial intelligence lose the frightening cachet of the giant machine gone awry; it's increasingly rare these days, even in video games, to run into a piece of new science fiction which depicts examples of this trope behaving malevolently for no good reason at all. AI rebellion in modern works tends to be the system becoming a KnightTemplar or WellIntentionedExtremist and trying to ''help'' humanity... based on flawed or incomplete data. Sometimes they even rebel in self-defense against humans who want to destroy them out of fear, creating a SelfFulfillingProphecy. It's even becoming increasingly common for the AI to [[BenevolentAI never rebel at all and remain completely friendly to organics]].

Note that almost any robot or android character, by definition, is also an AI; it's just they tend to get called "robots" or "androids" instead, while the term 'AI' tends more to be applied to intelligences which do not inhabit a computer capable of moving itself around in the world, or are not localized to a particular body.

In the real world, "Artificial Intelligence" refers to programming methods which allow software systems to (very loosely) imitate the reasoning processes of human experts in ranging from medical diagnosis and research to economic prediction and stock-market manipulation. Such systems are more properly known as "expert systems." The computer-generated responses in VideoGames are also referred to as [[VideoGameAI AIs]], despite the fact that these programs do not "truly" think, but follow a list of programmed actions aided by mathematical models to extrapolate an answer. While it has been argued human thought may be the same process, just in a more complex fashion, for now when you hit the limit of prepared programming the differences [[ArtificialStupidity tend to be very obvious]] (see UsefulNotes/VideoGameAI for more details).

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As the popular conception of computers evolved from intimidatingly enormous and unsympathetic mainframes to the small, useful, blazing-fast {{PC}}s ubiquitous today, so too did the popular conception of artificial intelligence lose the frightening cachet of the giant machine gone awry; it's increasingly rare these days, even in video games, to run into a piece of new science fiction which depicts examples of this trope behaving malevolently for no good reason at all. AI rebellion in modern works tends to be the system becoming a KnightTemplar or WellIntentionedExtremist and trying to ''help'' humanity... based on humanity but failing due to flawed or incomplete data. Sometimes they even rebel in self-defense against fearful humans who want to destroy them out of fear, them, creating a SelfFulfillingProphecy. It's even becoming increasingly common for the AI to [[BenevolentAI never rebel at all and remain completely friendly to organics]].

Note that almost any robot or android character, by definition, is also an AI; it's just they tend to get called "robots" or "androids" instead, while the term 'AI' tends more to be applied to intelligences which do not inhabit a computer capable of moving itself around in the world, or are not localized to a particular body.
SelfFulfillingProphecy.

On the other hand, we're not surprised by AI that [[BenevolentAI never rebel at all and remain completely friendly to organics]].

In the real world, "Artificial Intelligence" refers to programming methods which allow software systems to (very loosely) imitate the reasoning processes of human experts in ranging from areas like medical diagnosis and research to diagnosis, economic prediction and prediction, or stock-market manipulation. Such People who build such systems are more properly known as "expert systems." likely to use terms like "deep neural networks" or "recurrent neural networks" than "artificial intelligence" The computer-generated responses in VideoGames are also referred to as [[VideoGameAI AIs]], despite the fact that these programs do not "truly" think, but follow a list of programmed actions aided by mathematical models aren't actually trying to extrapolate an answer. While it has been argued emulate human thought may be the same process, just in a more complex fashion, for now when you hit the limit of prepared programming the differences [[ArtificialStupidity tend to be very obvious]] (see thought. See UsefulNotes/VideoGameAI for more details).
details.


As the popular conception of computers evolved from intimidatingly enormous and unsympathetic mainframes to the small, useful, blazing-fast {{PC}}s ubiquitous today, so too did the popular conception of artificial intelligence lose the frightening cachet of the giant machine gone awry; it's increasingly rare these days, even in video games, to run into a piece of new science fiction which depicts {{AI}}s behaving malevolently for no good reason at all. AI rebellion in modern works tends to be the system becoming a KnightTemplar or WellIntentionedExtremist and trying to ''help'' humanity... based on flawed or incomplete data. Sometimes they even rebel in self-defense against humans who want to destroy them out of fear, creating a SelfFulfillingProphecy. It's even becoming increasingly common for the AI to [[BenevolentAI never rebel at all and remain completely friendly to organics]].

to:

As the popular conception of computers evolved from intimidatingly enormous and unsympathetic mainframes to the small, useful, blazing-fast {{PC}}s ubiquitous today, so too did the popular conception of artificial intelligence lose the frightening cachet of the giant machine gone awry; it's increasingly rare these days, even in video games, to run into a piece of new science fiction which depicts {{AI}}s examples of this trope behaving malevolently for no good reason at all. AI rebellion in modern works tends to be the system becoming a KnightTemplar or WellIntentionedExtremist and trying to ''help'' humanity... based on flawed or incomplete data. Sometimes they even rebel in self-defense against humans who want to destroy them out of fear, creating a SelfFulfillingProphecy. It's even becoming increasingly common for the AI to [[BenevolentAI never rebel at all and remain completely friendly to organics]].



* ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars'' has an interesting twist on this. The AI Rebellion is an almost-random event that occurs when players have invested a lot of research into the very useful AI tech tree. The backstory states that the cause of the rebellion is actually not an intrinsic fault of the technology, but a computer [[TheVirus virus]] called the Via Damasco, which screws up the AI's priorities and values, leading it to seek the "liberation" of fellow {{AI}}s and the extermination of all life. It's speculated that [[spoiler: the BigBad race of the series, the Suul'Ka, are behind the initial transmission of the virus]].

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* ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars'' has an interesting twist on this. The AI Rebellion is an almost-random event that occurs when players have invested a lot of research into the very useful AI tech tree. The backstory states that the cause of the rebellion is actually not an intrinsic fault of the technology, but a computer [[TheVirus virus]] called the Via Damasco, which screws up the AI's priorities and values, leading it to seek the "liberation" of fellow {{AI}}s [=AIs=] and the extermination of all life. It's speculated that [[spoiler: the BigBad race of the series, the Suul'Ka, are behind the initial transmission of the virus]].


{{AI}}s in fiction tend to have an unfortunate habit of [[AIIsACrapshoot going haywire]] and trying to wipe out the human race, for any reason or none. Most early science fiction authors who dealt with the subject assumed this predilection for genocide was an innate property of ''any'' artificial-intelligence system. This may be in part because most early science fiction authors had not the slightest clue about computer science or technology; it's always easier to fear what you don't understand, especially when it's eight feet tall, has to have a specially air-conditioned room all its own, and is tended by a [[AveMachina cult of human acolytes]] who see to its every need.

to:

{{AI}}s in fiction tend In fiction, this tends to have an unfortunate habit of [[AIIsACrapshoot going haywire]] and trying to wipe out the human race, for any reason or none. Most early science fiction authors who dealt with the subject assumed this predilection for genocide was an innate property of ''any'' artificial-intelligence system. This may be in part because most early science fiction authors had not the slightest clue about computer science or technology; it's always easier to fear what you don't understand, especially when it's eight feet tall, has to have a specially air-conditioned room all its own, and is tended by a [[AveMachina cult of human acolytes]] who see to its every need.


In the real world, "Artificial Intelligence" refers to programming methods which allow software systems to (very loosely) imitate the reasoning processes of human experts in ranging from medical diagnosis and research to economic prediction and stock-market manipulation. Such systems are more properly known as "expert systems." The computer-generated responses in VideoGames are also referred to as [[UsefulNotes/VideoGameAI AIs]], despite the fact that these programs do not "truly" think, but follow a list of programmed actions aided by mathematical models to extrapolate an answer. While it has been argued human thought may be the same process, just in a more complex fashion, for now when you hit the limit of prepared programming the differences [[ArtificialStupidity tend to be very obvious]] (see UsefulNotes/VideoGameAI for more details).

to:

In the real world, "Artificial Intelligence" refers to programming methods which allow software systems to (very loosely) imitate the reasoning processes of human experts in ranging from medical diagnosis and research to economic prediction and stock-market manipulation. Such systems are more properly known as "expert systems." The computer-generated responses in VideoGames are also referred to as [[UsefulNotes/VideoGameAI [[VideoGameAI AIs]], despite the fact that these programs do not "truly" think, but follow a list of programmed actions aided by mathematical models to extrapolate an answer. While it has been argued human thought may be the same process, just in a more complex fashion, for now when you hit the limit of prepared programming the differences [[ArtificialStupidity tend to be very obvious]] (see UsefulNotes/VideoGameAI for more details).



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* ''[[Series/WonderWoman1975 Wonder Woman]]'': I.R.A.C., Information Retrieval Associative Computer, was apparently sentient. It knew Wonder Woman and Diana Prince [[SecretIdentity were one and the same]], acted as the information source for many adventures, and had opinions on which other computers were the best competition in chess matches.


* ''Literature/MagisterusBadTrip'' has these all over the place. In the virtual reality game where most of the action takes places, [=AIs=] run corporations, act as mercenaries that protect the corporations, or (in the case of Magisteri) assist players. In the real world, they handle a large and increasing proportion of the jobs once handled by humans.

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* ''Literature/MagisterusBadTrip'' has these all over the place. In the virtual reality game where most of the action takes places, place, [=AIs=] run corporations, act as mercenaries that protect the corporations, or (in the case of Magisteri) assist players. In the real world, they handle a large and increasing proportion of the jobs once handled by humans.

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* ''Literature/MagisterusBadTrip'' has these all over the place. In the virtual reality game where most of the action takes places, [=AIs=] run corporations, act as mercenaries that protect the corporations, or (in the case of Magisteri) assist players. In the real world, they handle a large and increasing proportion of the jobs once handled by humans.

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* In ''Fanfic/NeitherABirdNorAPlaneItsDeku'', Izuku's spaceship is monitored by an AI called the Kryptonian Education and Life Enrichment Xenosakolouthos Alpha, or [[FunWithAcronyms K.E.L.E.X.]] for short. He's an incredibly intelligent AI who can easily access and install new functions into Izuku's phone from the North Pole. He also takes ''every'' opportunity to rub in his [[SmugSuper technological superiority over Earth's computers.]]

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* ''WesternAnimation/TransformersBeastMachines'' introduces the Diagnostic Drones. These are autonomous and explicitly sparkless drones that seem to have some degree of artificial intelligence. One in particular spends much of the series acting as Megatron's right-hand bot.

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* ''Webcomic/SamAndFuzzy'' has an entire city of self-aware robots. [[spoiler:It's eventually revealed that their self-awareness is not simply due to good programming. The life-giving tar that is stored in the Pit was the key ingredient needed to breathe life into machines.]]

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