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* {{Pinball}} example: In ''Pinball/StarTrekStern'', it was discovered very early on that you could advance all six of the Level 1 missions without penalty simply by catching the ball on the flipper and waiting it out until time runs out. This cleared the mission, and upon clearing all six, Kobayashi Maru Multiball would begin. This would prove incredibly boring to watch and, according to some top players, boring to play. Subsequent [[ObviousRulePatch patches]] to this game increased point values for Kobayashi Maru Multiball based on points earned during the Level 1 missions, froze the timer if the game figures the player isn't doing anything, greatly increased points earned by actually shooting the correct shots for Level 1 missions, and awarded broze, silver, or gold medals for having made enough successful shots for each Level 1 mission.

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* {{Pinball}} example: In ''Pinball/StarTrekStern'', it was discovered very early on that you could advance all six of the Level 1 missions without penalty simply by catching the ball on the flipper and waiting it out until time runs out. This cleared the mission, and upon clearing all six, Kobayashi Maru Multiball would begin. This would prove incredibly boring to watch and, according to some top players, boring to play. Subsequent [[ObviousRulePatch patches]] to this game increased point values for Kobayashi Maru Multiball based on points earned during the Level 1 missions, froze the timer if the game figures the player isn't doing anything, greatly increased points earned by actually shooting the correct shots for Level 1 missions, and awarded broze, silver, or gold medals for having made enough successful shots for each Level 1 mission.


* ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic 4'' and ''5'' joined together to create a super-game. You could use the same characters to travel back AND forth between the two worlds. As you can imagine, with two entire game worlds to explore, you could level to ridiculous heights. Unfortunately, the real stopping resource wasn't experience points, but money. Monsters didn't respawn (and the few that did gave no gold or items) and leveling up costed exponentially more gold pieces (Specifically, to train one character from level x to level x+1 cost 10*x^2 GP). It was actually most efficient to skip all the 'level up for free' rewards entirely until you had bottomed out on training realistically, but you could always work one week for 50 gold (or something like that). This became a factor when you realise characters had real ages that went up and required 50,000,000 gold to go from 1xx to 1xx+1.

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* ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic 4'' and ''5'' joined together to create a super-game. You could use the same characters to travel back AND forth between the two worlds. As you can imagine, with two entire game worlds to explore, you could level to ridiculous heights. Unfortunately, the real stopping resource wasn't experience points, but money. Monsters didn't respawn (and the few that did gave no gold or items) and leveling up costed exponentially more gold pieces (Specifically, to train one character from level x to level x+1 cost 10*x^2 GP). It was actually most efficient to skip all the 'level up for free' rewards entirely until you had bottomed out on training realistically, but you could always work one week for 50 gold (or something like that). This became a factor when you realise characters had real ages that went up and required might literally die of old age grinding the 50,000,000 gold to go from 1xx to 1xx+1.


* Zigzagged in the first ''VideoGame/InFAMOUS''. The game prevents you from grinding your KarmaMeter until certain points in the story. It still serves the same function as other forms of AntiGrinding, since you can't get the best upgrades for your powers until the game wants you to. You can still grind for experience points to spend on the powers you'll eventually unlock, though.
** The second game, however, averts this trope. You can grind your KarmaMeter as high as you want to as soon as you finish the intro missions.

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* Zigzagged in the first ''VideoGame/InFAMOUS''. The game ''VideoGame/InFAMOUS'' prevents you from grinding your KarmaMeter until certain points in the story. It still serves the same function as other forms of AntiGrinding, since you can't get the best upgrades for your powers until the game wants you to. You can still grind for experience points to spend on the powers you'll eventually unlock, though.
** The In the second game, however, averts this trope. You however you can grind your KarmaMeter as high as you want to as soon as you finish the intro missions.



* ''VideoGame/{{killer7}}'', while not an RPG, does have a level grinding mechanic: killing enemies earns you thick blood, which can be turned into serum at save points and used to upgrade your characters. However, you can only carry 1000 units of thick blood at once, it doesn't carry over through levels, and if you convert enough the serum conversion machine stops working until the next level. The last level in which Blood is obtainable, Smile, Part 2, on the other hand, seems to be an aversion, as the blood that can be converted is either much higher or unlimited, though the cost is that grinding is much harder due to enemies either giving little blood, being hard to get blood from, or, if you DO find an enemy that gives a lot of blood easily, they won't respawn.

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* ''VideoGame/{{killer7}}'', while not an RPG, does have a level grinding mechanic: killing enemies earns you thick blood, which can be turned into serum at save points and used to upgrade your characters. However, you can only carry 1000 units of thick blood at once, it doesn't carry over through levels, and if you convert enough the serum conversion machine stops working until the next level. The On the last level in which Blood is obtainable, Smile, Part 2, on the other hand, seems to be an aversion, as the blood that can be converted is either much higher or unlimited, though the cost is that grinding is much harder due to enemies either giving little blood, being hard to get blood from, or, if you DO find an enemy that gives a lot of blood easily, they won't respawn.



* Like most of the other [=MMORPGs=] on this list, ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' has monsters start giving less experience, then eventually none, as you gain levels. On top of that, characters max out their levels and gear fairly quickly through each campaign (or start with max level if they're PvP only). The game was designed from the ground up to put veterans and relative n00bs on equal footing, rewarding skill and strategy instead of the number of hours you've invested. You can certainly grind for money and materials for spiffy wardrobes and more skill and equipment options, but they won't necessarily make you any stronger. [[AvertedTrope Averted]] in that there are easily unlockable upgrade runes for PvP, and [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] in how the PvE runes require grinding, but the enemy mobs are easy enough to defeat without them anyway.
** Considering the game was designed with an anti-grinding philosophy, it's funny that trying to get to the maximum level in the tutorial world has gained something of a following, to the point where the developers have started adding content to support it. As enemies eventually stop giving XP, this seems like an impossible task, if it wasn't for the fact that enemies can actually gain levels of of killing ''you''. This means that hordes of player[[InvertedTrope level grind an enemy monster]] so that its level increases enough to give experience to high-level players.

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* Like most of the other [=MMORPGs=] on this list, ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' has monsters start giving less experience, then eventually none, as you gain levels. On top of that, characters max out their levels and gear fairly quickly through each campaign (or start with max level if they're PvP only). The game was designed from the ground up to put veterans and relative n00bs on equal footing, rewarding skill and strategy instead of the number of hours you've invested. You can certainly grind for money and materials for spiffy wardrobes and more skill and equipment options, but they won't necessarily make you any stronger. [[AvertedTrope Averted]] in that there are easily unlockable upgrade runes for PvP, and [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] in how the PvE runes require grinding, but the enemy mobs are easy enough to defeat without them anyway.
stronger.
** Considering the game was designed with an anti-grinding philosophy, it's funny that trying to get to the maximum level in the tutorial world has gained something of a following, to the point where the developers have started adding content to support it. As enemies eventually stop giving XP, this seems like an impossible task, if it wasn't for the fact that enemies can actually gain levels of of killing ''you''. This means that hordes of player[[InvertedTrope players level grind an enemy monster]] monster so that its level increases enough to give experience to high-level players.



** Amusingly averted in the ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode based on the game, when the boys were forced to grind to max level by repeatedly killing the lowest level boars for weeks on end, in a noob-zone that the episode's villain wouldn't bother entering.



* ''VideoGame/StarcraftII'': While it's possible to replay levels in order to get achievements or research power-ups that you missed the first time around, you can only do so with the units you had then (no upgrading that level's units and replaying it or bringing battlecruisers in the second level). There was a GoodBadBug where replaying old levels still counted the research found towards your total (at some point it caps out, and you get money instead to get all the upgrades for your units). Averted in ''VideoGame/HeartOfTheSwarm'', where you can replay missions with every unlocked unit, switch Kerrigan's abilities and unit variation, making achievements much easier to obtain.

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* ''VideoGame/StarcraftII'': While it's possible to replay levels in order to get achievements or research power-ups that you missed the first time around, you can only do so with the units you had then (no upgrading that level's units and replaying it or bringing battlecruisers in the second level). There was a GoodBadBug where replaying old levels still counted the research found towards your total (at some point it caps out, and you get money instead to get all the upgrades for your units). Averted in ''VideoGame/HeartOfTheSwarm'', where you can replay missions with every unlocked unit, switch Kerrigan's abilities and unit variation, making achievements much easier to obtain.



* Conception2ChildrenOfTheSevenStars looks like it plays it straight, but is actually a subversion. Once the main character gets strong enough, monsters on the field become blue and look visibly weaker, allowing you to kill them by merely running into them. However, it also gives experience as if you fought the monster normally. Considering you can only bring one of seven heroines in a dungeon at a time, this is a great way to help bring weaker heroines up to level.



** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' also awarded EXP for healing or buffing allies, but made itself highly abusable that way as well. Since you'd always get 10 EXP (and 100 EXP needed for each level) if the target had the same level, 2 Jugglers could just pass turns between each other for all eternity with Smile Toss or Quicken (which does cost mana). The sequel averted that method by only giving out EXP at the end of the battle, with a large portion of exp being static (up to 60) with small bonuses going to especially valuable party members.
** It should be noted, that although ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'' makes it difficult to level your highest level characters, there is a quick way to [[CantCatchUp level up stragglers]]: send them into battle alongside one really strong character, then have them take turns [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential pelting him with rocks]].
** You ''could'' grind your high level characters indefinitely by using self-targeting moves (such as Accumulate from the Squire class, or Chakra from the Monk class if you've taken damage) which will always give 10 EXP per action. Provided that you can last long enough, you could theoretically take a party from level 1 to level 99 in one fight - and it's fairly easy to reduce the enemy side to one completely irrelevant unit. That being said, it still takes a really long time and isn't generally worth it, though it can be useful when grinding for job points.

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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' also awarded EXP for healing or buffing allies, but made itself highly abusable that way as well. Since you'd always get 10 EXP (and 100 EXP needed for each level) if the target had the same level, 2 Jugglers could just pass turns between each other for all eternity with Smile Toss or Quicken (which does cost mana). The sequel averted blocked that method by only giving out EXP at the end of the battle, with a large portion of exp being static (up to 60) with small bonuses going to especially valuable party members.
** It should be noted, that although Although ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'' makes it difficult to level your highest level characters, there is a quick way to [[CantCatchUp level up stragglers]]: send them into battle alongside one really strong character, then have them take turns [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential pelting him with rocks]].
** You ''could'' grind your high level characters indefinitely by using self-targeting moves (such as Accumulate from the Squire class, or Chakra from the Monk class if you've taken damage) which will always give 10 EXP per action. Provided that you can last long enough, you could theoretically take a party from level 1 to level 99 in one fight - and it's fairly easy to reduce the enemy side to one completely irrelevant unit. That being said, it still takes a really long time and isn't generally worth it, though it can be useful when grinding for job points.
rocks]].



** Subverted in that random encounters are available in infinite, if slow quantities on many maps, and that many of these are pure evil critters like ghosts and skeletons, which impart significantly reduced alignment penalties (and massive bonuses at low levels!). This is so much the case that it's possible to access many of the game's upper-tier unit types barely 1/4 of the way into the game with no penalty to speak of, save wasted time.

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** Subverted in that random Random encounters are available in infinite, if slow quantities on many maps, and that many of these are pure evil critters like ghosts and skeletons, which impart significantly reduced alignment penalties (and massive bonuses at low levels!). This is so much the case that it's possible to access many of the game's upper-tier unit types barely 1/4 of the way into the game with no penalty to speak of, save wasted time.



** Played straight and inverted with ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''' and '''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'''s experience system. All Pokémon now receive an additional experience modifier based on the ratio between user and opponents' respective levels; as your party members level up, the same opponents (e.g. wild Pokémon) award fewer experience points than they did before. On the flipside, this means that low-level party members (such as freshly bred Pokémon) level up faster when you defeat high-level opponents (especially since it stacks with all the other modifiers, like the bonus on traded Pokémon or Trainer battles, and the Exp. Share).

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** Played straight and inverted with In ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''' and '''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'''s experience system. All system, all Pokémon now receive an additional experience modifier based on the ratio between user and opponents' respective levels; as your party members level up, the same opponents (e.g. wild Pokémon) award fewer experience points than they did before. On the flipside, this means that low-level party members (such as freshly bred Pokémon) level up faster when you defeat high-level opponents (especially since it stacks with all the other modifiers, like the bonus on traded Pokémon or Trainer battles, and the Exp. Share).



* Subverted or Inverted or...''something'' in ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}''. The game has an AbsurdlyHighLevelCap of 9999, but to beat the story mode you will probably not need to get any higher than level 100 (the [[UpToEleven post game content]] however...). To facilitate this, the experience formula changes for enemies at level 99 and above, becoming linear as opposed to exponential. So if you are just going through story mode, you'll find that your progress slows at around this point, so you probably won't accidentally grind your way to the point of making the final boss irrelevant. However, the change in the experience formula ''also'' means that level 99 enemies are worth about as much as level '''300''' enemies, so there is always a level ''specifically'' set up by the devs to feature lots of Exp-boosting GeoEffects and enemies that can be boosted to ''exactly'' level 99 with a few "Stronger Enemies" bills. This means that experienced players can easily grind their way over this experience "hump" and prepare themselves for the post game.


* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' originally had a "Fatigue" system that gradually reduced the amount of experience points you could gain in one class if you did too much grinding, forcing you to switch to another class if you wanted to continue having 100% returns. Due to some misinformation about the specifics (people assumed that it would punish everyday players, when in fact the Fatigue cap was set so high that you would have had to grind as your full-time job for it to have an effect) it proved massively unpopular and was shelved completely after a few months.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' originally had a "Fatigue" system that gradually reduced the amount of experience points you could gain in one class if you did too much grinding, forcing you to switch to another class if you wanted to continue having 100% returns. Due to some misinformation about the specifics (people assumed that it would punish everyday players, when in fact the Fatigue cap was set so high that you would have had to grind as your full-time job for it to have an effect) it proved massively unpopular and was shelved completely after a few months. Eventually it was replaced with a rested EXP system, where you would accumulate a bonus by spending time logged out in safe areas -- [[DistinctionWithoutADifference functionally quite similar]], but much better received, because it was framed as a reward for taking breaks rather than a punishment for grinding too much.

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* In its third edition, ''TabletopGame/TheDarkEye'' awarded a large amount of experience for the first encounter with a creature and decreased it with every following one (as it is less of a new experience, one can learn from). Since the fourth edition, experience is only awarded for completed tasks and adventures to avoid grinding.


* ''VideoGame/StellaGlow'' employs the usual tactic of causing lower-level enemies to give less experience, but it also subtly enforces this trope by encouraging the player to make use of LevelUpFillUp to turn the tides of battle.


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* ''VideoGame/StellaGlow'' employs the usual tactic of causing lower-level enemies to give less experience, but it also subtly enforces this trope by encouraging the player to make use of LevelUpFillUp to turn the tides of battle in the middle of a stage.





** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' has several measures to keep players from excessive powerleveling. Experience is based on level, so grinding on weak enemies is almost pointless, but for the main character, persona experience is separate from your own. Personas level extremely slowly, and most useful personas are several levels above you, making it even slower. Since stats and skills are based on the persona, while your own level only controls Hp and Sp, grinding is usually less useful than just making a better persona. For other party members, their personas level at the same rate as them, but this still leaves them far behind the MC, who can easily be fusing personas many levels higher than anyone else.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' has several measures to keep players from excessive powerleveling. Experience is based on level, so grinding on weak enemies is almost pointless, but for the main character, persona experience is separate from your own. Personas level extremely slowly, and most useful personas are several levels above you, making it even slower. Since stats and skills are based on the persona, while your own level only controls Hp HP and Sp, SP, grinding is usually less useful than just making a better persona.persona. Your Social Links also bestow a large surge of experience that would normally take a fair bit of grinding to achieve, encouraging the player to fuse Personas rather than collect them from Shuffle Time. For other party members, their personas level at the same rate as them, but this still leaves them far behind the MC, who can easily be fusing personas many levels higher than anyone else.



*** ''Golden'' gives Golden Hands a large amount of experience and Yen, making grinding significantly easier. They have a shocking amount of defense, but it can be easily avoided with damage dealing items, or by triggering All- Out Attacks via critical hits.

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*** ''Golden'' gives Golden Hands a large amount of experience and Yen, making grinding significantly easier. They have a shocking amount of defense, but it can be easily avoided with damage dealing items, or by triggering All- Out All-Out Attacks via critical hits.



* ''VideoGame/StellaGlow'' employs the usual tactic of causing lower-level enemies to give less experience, but it also subtly enforces this trope by encouraging the player to make use of LevelUpFillUp to turn the tides of battle.



* ''MonsterGirlQuest'' averts grinding entirely due to having a finite amount of battles, some of which are skippable based on your choices, so it's only ever possible to be as strong as you would be from fighting all available enemies. Thanks to a GoodBadBug in Chapter 2, though, it is possible to fight Yamata-no-Orochi over and over to level grind.

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* ''MonsterGirlQuest'' ''Monster Girl Quest'' averts grinding entirely due to having a finite amount of battles, some of which are skippable based on your choices, so it's only ever possible to be as strong as you would be from fighting all available enemies. Thanks to a GoodBadBug in Chapter 2, though, it is possible to fight Yamata-no-Orochi over and over to level grind.


* ''VideoGame/MonsterGirlQuest'' has scripted fights (Some can be skipped depending on your choices), so it's only ever possible to be as strong as you would be from fighting all available enemies. Thanks to a GoodBadBug in Chapter 2, though, it is possible to fight Yamata-no-Orochi over and over to level grind.

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* ''VideoGame/MonsterGirlQuest'' has scripted fights (Some can be skipped depending ''MonsterGirlQuest'' averts grinding entirely due to having a finite amount of battles, some of which are skippable based on your choices), choices, so it's only ever possible to be as strong as you would be from fighting all available enemies. Thanks to a GoodBadBug in Chapter 2, though, it is possible to fight Yamata-no-Orochi over and over to level grind.


* VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou both averts this and plays it straight with its various level-up systems. The amount of experience needed to reach the next character level increases on a linear scale, making grinding fairly quick and easy compared to most [=RPGs=]; however, all this does is increase your HP. To increase your stats, you have to give your characters food and digest it by fighting battles, though they can only eat so many large items every ''real-world'' day (though you can keep eating the small items that give +2 or so to a given stat). Lasts, only certain types of pins evolve when leveled up in battle, others involve either turning the game off or using the mingle function.

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* VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou both averts this and plays it straight with its various level-up systems. The amount of experience needed to reach the next character level increases on a linear scale, making grinding fairly quick and easy compared to most [=RPGs=]; however, all this does is increase your HP. To increase your stats, you have to give your characters food and digest it by fighting battles, though they can only eat so many large items every ''real-world'' day (though you can keep eating the small items that give +2 or so to a given stat).stat, and beating the game allows you to buy an item that removes the above restriction). Lasts, only certain types of pins evolve when leveled up in battle, others involve either turning the game off or using the mingle function.


In just about any RolePlayingGame that has a level system, players will try to make the game easier for themselves via LevelGrinding. Most games only gently discourage this, by simply making each level take longer to reach than the one before it, unless you're actually going through the game at the intended pace - in which case the requirements for gaining a level end up keeping pace with what you can get toward a level-up from the current enemies.

Sometimes, however, the developers decide that they ''really'' don't want you to level grind like that, so they'll put in more measures to prevent it. They may simply make it so hard to get your level higher than the one they want you at that even a dedicated level grinder would give up in disgust or resort to a cheat device, or they might make it actually impossible to level past a certain point before you get to the next part of the plot. This is Anti Grinding.

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In just about any RolePlayingGame that has a level system, players will try to make the game easier for themselves via LevelGrinding. Most games only gently discourage this, by simply making each level take longer to reach than the one before it, unless you're actually going through the game at the intended pace - -- in which case the requirements for gaining a level end up keeping pace with what you can get toward a level-up from the current enemies.

Sometimes, however, the developers decide that they ''really'' don't want you to level grind like that, so they'll put in more measures to prevent it. They may simply make it so hard to get your level higher than the one they want you at that even a dedicated level grinder would give up in disgust or resort to a cheat device, or they might make it actually impossible to level past a certain point before you get to the next part of the plot. This is Anti Grinding.Anti-Grinding.


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* ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy'': Certain free quests that provide some of the rare materials in the game can only be attempted twice a day.
** Zig-zaged for a majority of the raid boss battles; there is a daily limit on the number of times that you can host specific Raid Bosses (i.e. a maximum of 3 tries for the six elemental Normal, Hard, and Magna Raids, and once a day on the Primarch raids) but there is no limit on the maximum amount of battles that you can ''join'', which are started by other players. Plus, if you do run out of AP/EP refilling reserves, you must wait until you can have the appropriate amount before starting or joining a quest.
** The player can only attempt two Solo Primarch Raid battles in a day, regardless of the element or difficulty of the boss.
** The Arcarum is gated on an item called "Expedition Tickets" which are equivalent to the number of times that the player can start expeditions. However, there is no other method to obtain these than waiting for a ticket on the next day.


The most common forms of this are escalating "experience to next level" values, where the higher your level goes, the more excessive the amount of experience you need to level up, and adjusted experience gains, where the amount of experience you earn for defeating an enemy is relative to your current level -- a level 50 party killing level 4 enemies would get a whopping 1 experience point for their trouble. Another option is to [[LevelScaling make enemies gain levels along with the player]], so grinding an extra ten levels leaves you with enemies ten levels tougher, too. If the enemy also learns new attacks and powers as they level up, this could backfire on the player, making those {{Giant Spider}}s extra [[DemonicSpiders demonic]]. A few games (but not MMORPG ones) [[TimedMission add a time limit]] to discourage excessive grinding so a player must go to next area / complete objectives within a certain amount of time.

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The most common forms of this are escalating "experience to next level" values, where the higher your level goes, the more excessive the amount of experience you need to level up, and adjusted experience gains, where the amount of experience you earn for defeating an enemy is relative to your current level -- a level 50 party killing curb-stomping some level 4 enemies would get a whopping 1 experience point for their trouble. Another option is to [[LevelScaling make enemies gain levels along with the player]], so grinding an extra ten levels leaves you with enemies ten levels tougher, too. If the enemy also learns new attacks and powers as they level up, this could backfire on the player, making those {{Giant Spider}}s extra [[DemonicSpiders demonic]]. A few games (but not MMORPG ones) [[TimedMission add a time limit]] to discourage excessive grinding so a player must go to next area / complete objectives within a certain amount of time.


** After the broken system in ''Oblivion'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' implemented several improved methods to combat grinding. Taking a note from their ''Franchise/{{Fallout}}'' sister series, enemies within an area scale to whatever level you are when you first ''enter'' that area. Additionally, you now have to spend all your abilities (but not perks) at the one time, so you can only recharge health, stamina, and magicka [[LevelUpFillUp through leveling]] up once. Finally, it keeps the (rather justifiable) logic that leveling up non-combat skills still means facing stronger enemies who have scaled to your level.

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** After the broken system in ''Oblivion'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' implemented several improved methods to combat grinding. Taking a note from their ''Franchise/{{Fallout}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' sister series, enemies within an area scale to whatever level you are when you first ''enter'' that area. Additionally, you now have to spend all your abilities (but not perks) at the one time, so you can only recharge health, stamina, and magicka [[LevelUpFillUp through leveling]] up once. Finally, it keeps the (rather justifiable) logic that leveling up non-combat skills still means facing stronger enemies who have scaled to your level.

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* In ''VideoGame/TheMagicOfScheherazade'', your level can only go so high before you have to move to the next chapter, and when you do, even if your level was under the maximum allowed in the previous chapter, it's set to the previous chapter's maximum level in the new chapter. This is mostly because unlike most other games of its type, it uses a PasswordSave and not having to keep track of your level and experience helps keep the passwords at a reasonable length.

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*** Like in ''Persona 4'', returning to the lobby doesn't restore your HP and SP. However, there's no option to spend money to recover your SP. Instead, SP restoring items are more readily available, but only if you've raised certain [[LevelUpAtIntimacy5 Confidants]] that allow you to acquire said items. Otherwise, they're just as rare as before.

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