Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Literature / TheDivineComedy

Go To



** He also ryhmed *volse* with *volse*, though in the first case it means “turned” and in the second “wanted.”

to:

** He also ryhmed *volse* ''volse'' with *volse*, ''volse'', though in the first case it means “turned” and in the second “wanted.”

Added DiffLines:

** He also ryhmed *volse* with *volse*, though in the first case it means “turned” and in the second “wanted.”

Added DiffLines:

* FanDisservice: All of the sinners (except the hypocrites, who have to wear crushingly heavy robes as punishment) are nude, although this fact is rarely brought up. That said, given they are all trapped in a variety of eternal torments, it would be pretty hard for any but the most twisted people to find that fact erotic. Of special note is Thais, who is presumably a beautiful woman (being a famous courtesan in life), but is [[NauseaFuel covered from head to toe in shit as her punishment.]]


* ''[[AfterlifeAntechamber Purgatorio]]'': Having escaped Hell, Dante and Virgil scale the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory to meet [[Literature/VitaNuova Beatrice]], the most beautiful of the saints. The two pilgrims see how every sin can be turned to true love by the restless efforts of the remorseful.

to:

* ''[[AfterlifeAntechamber ''[[PurgatoryAndLimbo Purgatorio]]'': Having escaped Hell, Dante and Virgil scale the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory to meet [[Literature/VitaNuova Beatrice]], the most beautiful of the saints. The two pilgrims see how every sin can be turned to true love by the restless efforts of the remorseful.


* ThePhilosopher: A sphere in Heaven is dedicated to those who in life embodied wisdom and knowledge of that Deep Mind, including the likes of Thomas Aquinas, Saint Francis, Saint Dominic, and the many scholars and writers from the history of UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} up to 1300.

to:

* ThePhilosopher: A sphere in Heaven is dedicated to those who in life embodied wisdom and knowledge of that Deep Mind, including the likes of Thomas Aquinas, Saint Francis, Saint Dominic, and the many scholars and writers from the history of UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} up to 1300. A number of other pagan philosophers who were admired also have the nicest spot in the Inferno (as they cannot reach heaven without Christ, but were virtuous) such as {{Creator/Aristotle}} and {{Creator/Plato}}. However, others such as Epicurus and his followers are eternally tormented (as [[{{UsefulNotes/Epicureanism}} their philosophy]] denied there was an afterlife) in the first circle, for the heretics.



* PoliticallyIncorrectHero: Virgil is constantly praised in the poem and he is the one who directly leads Dante on the path to Heaven, but he also is a Pagan from Hell who never accepted Christ as all decent people were expected to in medieval Italian society. It can be easy to forget Virgil's paganism, but Dante notices it and is embarrassed when the mentor he loves talks about how he helped a pagan necromancer bring some souls out of Hell.

to:

* PoliticallyIncorrectHero: Virgil is constantly praised in the poem and he is the one who directly leads Dante on the path to Heaven, but he also is a Pagan pagan from Hell who never accepted Christ as all decent people were expected to in medieval Italian society. It can be easy to forget Virgil's paganism, but Dante notices it and is embarrassed when the mentor he loves talks about how he helped a pagan necromancer bring some souls out of Hell.

Added DiffLines:

* ArtisticLicensePhysics: The stated reason that Cocytus, lowest circle of Hell, is frozen, is that it's cooled by Satan's wings beating as he futilely attempts to free himself. Air movement in itself cannot lower a body's temperature.

Added DiffLines:

* TheAlmightyDollar: The fourth circle of Hell has an evil wealth demon/deity named Plutus who tortures "Hoarders and the Wasters".


Translations of the Comedy from Italian can be found all over the place online: there's the plain-and-annotated [[http://www.worldofdante.org/index.html World of Dante]], the poetic [[https://digitaldante.columbia.edu/text/ Digital Dante]], the scholarly [[http://dantelab.dartmouth.edu/ Dartmouth Dante Lab]], the navigable [[http://etcweb.princeton.edu/dante/index.html the Princeton Dante Project]], and [[http://www.danteonline.it/english/opere.asp?idope=1&idlang=OR Dante Online]], [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg which exists]]. There's also invaluable illustrations from [[http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/ Danteworlds]] from the epic's seven centuries worth of FanArt. An on-going archive of "sightings" of Dante in contemporary culture can be found at [[https://research.bowdoin.edu/dante-today/]]

to:

Translations of the Comedy from Italian can be found all over the place online: there's the plain-and-annotated [[http://www.worldofdante.org/index.html World of Dante]], the poetic [[https://digitaldante.columbia.edu/text/ Digital Dante]], the scholarly [[http://dantelab.dartmouth.edu/ Dartmouth Dante Lab]], the navigable [[http://etcweb.princeton.edu/dante/index.html the Princeton Dante Project]], and [[http://www.danteonline.it/english/opere.asp?idope=1&idlang=OR Dante Online]], [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg which exists]]. There's also invaluable illustrations from [[http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/ Danteworlds]] from the epic's seven centuries worth of FanArt. An on-going ever-growing archive of "sightings" of Dante in contemporary culture can be found at [[https://research.bowdoin.edu/dante-today/]]edu/dante-today/ Dante Today]]


Translations of the Comedy from Italian can be found all over the place online: there's the plain-and-annotated [[http://www.worldofdante.org/index.html World of Dante]], the poetic [[https://digitaldante.columbia.edu/text/ Digital Dante]], the scholarly [[http://dantelab.dartmouth.edu/ Dartmouth Dante Lab]], the navigable [[http://etcweb.princeton.edu/dante/index.html the Princeton Dante Project]], and [[http://www.danteonline.it/english/opere.asp?idope=1&idlang=OR Dante Online]], [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg which exists]]. There's also invaluable illustrations from [[http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/ Danteworlds]] from the epic's seven centuries worth of FanArt.

to:

Translations of the Comedy from Italian can be found all over the place online: there's the plain-and-annotated [[http://www.worldofdante.org/index.html World of Dante]], the poetic [[https://digitaldante.columbia.edu/text/ Digital Dante]], the scholarly [[http://dantelab.dartmouth.edu/ Dartmouth Dante Lab]], the navigable [[http://etcweb.princeton.edu/dante/index.html the Princeton Dante Project]], and [[http://www.danteonline.it/english/opere.asp?idope=1&idlang=OR Dante Online]], [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg which exists]]. There's also invaluable illustrations from [[http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/ Danteworlds]] from the epic's seven centuries worth of FanArt. An on-going archive of "sightings" of Dante in contemporary culture can be found at [[https://research.bowdoin.edu/dante-today/]]


** In ''Paradiso'' Canto 17, Dante references the many, many times he's heard people in Hell and Purgatory vaguely predict doom in his future when he asks his the soul of his great-great grandfather what that doom is.

to:

** In ''Paradiso'' Canto 17, Dante references the many, many times he's heard people in Hell and Purgatory vaguely predict doom in his future when he asks his the soul of his great-great grandfather what that doom is.



** The poem begins with its hero trying to climb out of a dark valley one last time, before a terrifying she-wolf causes him to abandon all hope of leaving and turning back into the sun-muted valley. Thank God [[Creator/{{Virgil}} a certain ghost]] arrive to give him a much more exciting way back home.

to:

** The poem begins with its hero trying to climb out of a dark valley one last time, before a terrifying she-wolf causes him to abandon all hope of leaving and turning back into the sun-muted valley. Thank God [[Creator/{{Virgil}} a certain ghost]] arrive arrives to give him a much more exciting way back home.



** Most of the character in ''Inferno'' would be better off not existing, considering they will spend eternity being perfectly tortured in Hell.

to:

** Most of the character characters in ''Inferno'' would be better off not existing, considering they will spend eternity being perfectly tortured in Hell.


* PurgatoryAndLimbo: One of the {{Trope Codifier}}s. ''Purgatorio'' (the middle work of the trilogy) is set here; the page image is taken from the woodcut illustrations created by Creator/GustaveDore. In the book, Limbo is the outermost circle of Hell; the final destination of "failed" souls who never attained salvation but aren't evil enough to merit any worse punishment then simply being estranged from God forever. In contrast, Purgatory is a sort of tough-love reform camp for saved but flawed souls who need to finish the process of becoming perfected enough to enter Heaven.

to:

* PurgatoryAndLimbo: One of the {{Trope Codifier}}s. ''Purgatorio'' (the middle work of the trilogy) is set here; the page image is taken from the woodcut illustrations created by Creator/GustaveDore. In the book, Limbo is the outermost circle of Hell; the final destination of "failed" souls who never attained salvation but aren't evil enough to merit any worse punishment then than simply being estranged from God forever. In contrast, Purgatory is a sort of tough-love reform camp for saved but flawed souls who need to finish the process of becoming perfected enough to enter Heaven.

Added DiffLines:

* PurgatoryAndLimbo: One of the {{Trope Codifier}}s. ''Purgatorio'' (the middle work of the trilogy) is set here; the page image is taken from the woodcut illustrations created by Creator/GustaveDore. In the book, Limbo is the outermost circle of Hell; the final destination of "failed" souls who never attained salvation but aren't evil enough to merit any worse punishment then simply being estranged from God forever. In contrast, Purgatory is a sort of tough-love reform camp for saved but flawed souls who need to finish the process of becoming perfected enough to enter Heaven.


** There are many clergy members and a few Popes in Hell. Most of them are seen in the circle for greed and the bolgias for simony, where corrupt priests are put upside-down into holes in the rock, with flames burning at their feet.

to:

** There are many clergy members and a few Popes in Hell. Most of them are seen in the circle for greed and the bolgias for simony, simony (selling church offices for money, a big problem in Dante's time), where corrupt priests are put upside-down into holes in the rock, with flames burning at their feet.


Added DiffLines:

* SympatheticAdulterer: Francesca plays the Pay Cheating Unto Arranged Marriage card to make herself and Paolo seem sympathetic. It works on Dante, but it clearly didn't impress God.


* SuicideIsShameful: Dante portrays the souls of the suicidal as residing in the 7th circle of Hell, reserved for the violent. For committing violence against themselves, they have their bodies entombed in oak trees or strewn across thorny bushes and are feasted upon by demonic harpies, and for rejecting the Love, they will be denied the chance to regain their human forms come the Day of Judgement.

to:

* SuicideIsShameful: Dante portrays the souls of the suicidal as residing in the 7th circle of Hell, reserved for the violent. Their sin is considered two-fold, and so is their punishment; For committing violence against themselves, they have their bodies entombed in oak trees or strewn across thorny bushes and are feasted upon by demonic harpies, and for rejecting the Love, God's love, they will be the only sinners denied the chance to regain their human forms come the Day of Judgement.


** On Mars, the souls of the [[HeroicSacrifice martyrs]] are in such harmony that they organize into what appears to be one gigantic cross and sings with what sounds like one heavenly voice.

to:

** On Mars, the souls of the [[HeroicSacrifice martyrs]] are in such harmony that they organize into what appears to be one gigantic cross and sings sing with what sounds like one heavenly voice.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 753

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report