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* DomesticAbuser: Phil, Angie's ex-husband. The first book opens with Angie sporting a black eye, and Patrick relates a previous incident where Angie told him to "be reasonable" after she showed up covered in bruises, and Patrick's response was to reasonably beat the hell out of Phil with a pool cue. This was not the first time this happened and Patrick seriously considers doing it again. Once Phil and Angie divorce Phil is seriously regretful of his behavior but Patrick never really forgives him for it, and by the time the two old friends start to patch things up [[spoiler:Phil is killed by Gerry Glynn]].

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* DomesticAbuser: DomesticAbuse: Phil, Angie's ex-husband. The first book opens with Angie sporting a black eye, and Patrick relates a previous incident where Angie told him to "be reasonable" after she showed up covered in bruises, and Patrick's response was to reasonably beat the hell out of Phil with a pool cue. This was not the first time this happened and Patrick seriously considers doing it again. Once Phil and Angie divorce Phil is seriously regretful of his behavior but Patrick never really forgives him for it, and by the time the two old friends start to patch things up [[spoiler:Phil is killed by Gerry Glynn]].


** In the second book, Patrick briefly uses the alias "[[Creator/DeForestKelley DeForest]] [[Creator/JamesDoohan Doohan]]" after getting into an argument with Angie over why he doesn't like ''Series/StarTrek''.

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** In the second book, Patrick briefly uses the alias "[[Creator/DeForestKelley DeForest]] [[Creator/JamesDoohan Doohan]]" after getting into an argument with Angie over why he doesn't like ''Series/StarTrek''.''Franchise/StarTrek''.


* NeverLiveItDown: {{In-universe}}, the fact that in ''Literature/GoneBabyGone'' Patrick wound up [[spoiler:taking down several corrupt cops]] has permanently put him on the BPD's shit-list.

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* NeverLiveItDown: {{In-universe}}, InUniverse, the fact that in ''Literature/GoneBabyGone'' Patrick wound up [[spoiler:taking down several corrupt cops]] has permanently put him on the BPD's shit-list.

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* HurtingHero: Patrick Kenzie.


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* IJustWriteTheThing: Lehane explains the 11 year gap between ''Prayers for Rain'' and ''Moonlight Mile'' as being because Patrick Kenzie wouldn't talk to him.

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* TheDitz: Helene [=McCready=] is a non-comedic example in ''Gone Baby Gone'', as the stupidity and thoughtlessness that might be funny under other circumstances are actually very hazardous traits for the mother of a young child, especially in a bad neighbourhood. It's only her brother who stops her from doing serious harm to Amanda.
** However, by the time of ''Moonlight Mile'' she's moved into a more typical example of this trope, because the older Amanda is now highly intelligent and independent, and all the damage Helene could do has already been done. An example of this is when she sees Amanda's baby, which by this point everyone (including her) knows is ''adopted'' rather than a blood relation, she immediately says the baby has her eyes. When her boyfriend Kenny incredulously asks her how it is that she's "allowed to vote and operate machinery", we get this gem:
--> "Cuz," Helene said proudly, "this is America." [[ImpliedFacepalm Kenny closed and opened his eyes.]]


A series of HardboiledDetective novels that started the career of Creator/DennisLehane, now famous as the author behind ''Literature/ShutterIsland'' and ''Literature/MysticRiver'', both of which were adapted into successful films. ''Literature/GoneBabyGone'', the fourth book in the series, was also adapted into a film, with Casey Affleck and Michelle Monaghan playing the title characters.\\
\\
The premise of the books is fairly simple: Patrick Kenzie is a wise-ass private detective working out of the tough, working-class Boston neighborhood of Dorchester. Always by his side is his faithful partner, the beautiful Angie Gennaro. Though they start out as PlatonicLifePartners, Patrick (in his narration) makes no secret of the fact that he's been in love with Angie since they were both teenagers. With their small, struggling detective agency, Patrick and Angie take it upon themselves to help every poor, downtrodden Bostonian who comes their way. Along the way, they end up tangling with everybody from drug lords, to serial killers, to {{Corrupt Corporate Executive}}s to crazed stalkers, standing up for what's right and occasionally leaving corpses in their wake. Despite the loads of horror that they have to deal with, Patrick and Angie manage to keep their sanity through the PowerOfFriendship, both with each other and with the other residents of their close-nit neighborhood. Naturally, they end up falling in love with each other along the way. \\
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With a heavy dose of realism and occasional social commentary, the series manages to subvert many cliches of detective fiction, and it's considered a prime example of "Neo Noir". In particular, it strongly averts StatusQuoIsGod, with many deliberate arcs over the course of six books.\\

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/918xaqsnkxl_sl1500.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:''A Drink Before the War'', the first book in the series]]

A series of HardboiledDetective novels that started the career of Creator/DennisLehane, now famous as the author behind ''Literature/ShutterIsland'' and ''Literature/MysticRiver'', both of which were adapted into successful films. ''Literature/GoneBabyGone'', the fourth book in the series, was also adapted into a film, with Casey Affleck and Michelle Monaghan playing the title characters.\\
\\
characters.

The premise of the books is fairly simple: Patrick Kenzie is a wise-ass private detective working out of the tough, working-class Boston neighborhood of Dorchester. Always by his side is his faithful partner, the beautiful Angie Gennaro. Though they start out as PlatonicLifePartners, Patrick (in his narration) makes no secret of the fact that he's been in love with Angie since they were both teenagers. With their small, struggling detective agency, Patrick and Angie take it upon themselves to help every poor, downtrodden Bostonian who comes their way. Along the way, they end up tangling with everybody from drug lords, to serial killers, to {{Corrupt Corporate Executive}}s to crazed stalkers, standing up for what's right and occasionally leaving corpses in their wake. Despite the loads of horror that they have to deal with, Patrick and Angie manage to keep their sanity through the PowerOfFriendship, both with each other and with the other residents of their close-nit neighborhood. Naturally, they end up falling in love with each other along the way. \\
\\
way.

The books are also rather notable for their strong adherence to specific themes in every installment, touching on many different shades of vice and evil as they examine the many diverse faces of criminality and injustice. The first book, for example, deals heavily with institutionalized racism and urban poverty in its portrayal of inner-city violence and political corruption, while the second deals with primal evil and insanity in its portrayal of serial killers, the third deals with greed and avarice in its portrayal of crooked businessmen, and the fourth deals with apathy in its portrayal of parental neglect--showing that apathy can often be just as harmful as outright violence.

With a heavy dose of realism and occasional social commentary, the series manages to subvert many cliches of detective fiction, and it's considered a prime example of "Neo Noir". In particular, it strongly averts StatusQuoIsGod, with many deliberate arcs over the course of six books.\\
books.


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* ShoutOut:
** The title of the first book is a reference to a famous episode of ''Series/FawltyTowers'', when Basil Fawlty tries to avoid mentioning "[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII the war]]" while catering to a group of German guests. He slips up and accidentally offers them "A drink before the war" instead of "A drink before lunch".
** In the second book, Patrick briefly uses the alias "[[Creator/DeForestKelley DeForest]] [[Creator/JamesDoohan Doohan]]" after getting into an argument with Angie over why he doesn't like ''Series/StarTrek''.
** In the third book, Patrick snarkily names one of Trevor Stone's bodyguards "Lurch", after the butler from ''Series/TheAddamsFamily''.


* BeingTorturedMakesYouEvil: [[spoiler:Evandro Arujo]] in the second book goes into prison a harmless petty thief, but his experience inside leaves him so thoroughly AxCrazy that he walks out as a disciple of a serial killer. His hair also [[LockedIntoStrangeness goes white]] from the trauma of what happened to him while he was inside.

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* BeingTorturedMakesYouEvil: [[spoiler:Evandro Arujo]] in the second book goes into prison a harmless petty thief, but his experience inside leaves him so thoroughly AxCrazy that he walks out as a disciple of a serial killer. His hair also [[LockedIntoStrangeness goes white]] from the trauma of what happened to him while he was inside. [[spoiler: Because he was reborn from a traumatic experience, and because of his ghostly white hair, he's considered "The Holy Ghost" to Gerry Glynn's "Father" and Alec Hardiman's "Son".]]


* AbsurdlyYouthfulMother: In ''Moonlight Mile'' [[spoiler:when they finally find the now 16 year old Amanda she has a baby with her, and though she claims that the baby is hers and that she gave birth to her Patrick doesn't buy it. It turns out that the baby is actually her friend Sophie's, who actually does qualify for this trope since she's the same age.]]


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* TeenPregnancy: In ''Moonlight Mile'' when they finally find the now 16 year old Amanda she has a baby with her, and though she claims that the baby is hers and that she gave birth to her Patrick doesn't buy it. It turns out that [[spoiler:the baby is actually her friend Sophie's, who actually does qualify for this trope since she's the same age.]]


* HeelFaceTurn: Phil Dimassi gets a big one. He's introduces in the first book as Angie's abusive, alcoholic husband who Patrick just refers to as "the asshole". In the second book, we learn that he was once Patrick's best friend, and that most of the animosity between them stems from Patrick's jealousy over him marrying Angie. After he and Angie get a divorce and he quits drinking, he and Patrick begin to reconnect.

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* HeelFaceTurn: Phil Dimassi gets a big one. He's introduces introduced in the first book as Angie's abusive, alcoholic husband who Patrick just refers to as "the asshole". In the second book, we learn that he was once Patrick's best friend, and that most of the animosity between them stems from Patrick's jealousy over him marrying Angie. After he and Angie get a divorce and he quits drinking, he and Patrick begin to reconnect.


* DomesticAbuser: Phil, Angie's ex-husband. The first book opens with Angie sporting a black eye, and Patrick relates a previous incident where Angie told him to "be reasonable" after she showed up covered in bruises, and Patrick's response was to reasonably beat the hell out of Phil with a pool cue. This was not the first time this happened and Patrick seriously considers doing it again. Once Phil and Angie divorce Phil is seriously regretful of his behavior but Patrick never forgives him for it.

to:

* DomesticAbuser: Phil, Angie's ex-husband. The first book opens with Angie sporting a black eye, and Patrick relates a previous incident where Angie told him to "be reasonable" after she showed up covered in bruises, and Patrick's response was to reasonably beat the hell out of Phil with a pool cue. This was not the first time this happened and Patrick seriously considers doing it again. Once Phil and Angie divorce Phil is seriously regretful of his behavior but Patrick never really forgives him for it.it, and by the time the two old friends start to patch things up [[spoiler:Phil is killed by Gerry Glynn]].


* {{Tuckerization}}: Several characters are based on real people, including Angie (the name of Lehane's real life wife) and Bubba (based on a childhood friend of Lehane's who is apparently a bit of a nut but nowhere near the fictional Bubba's level).

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* {{Tuckerization}}: Several characters are based on real people, including Angie (the Angie, which is the name of Lehane's real life wife) wife, and Bubba (based Bubba, who is based on a childhood friend of Lehane's who is apparently a bit of a nut but nowhere near the fictional Bubba's level).level.


* DomesticAbuser: Phil, Angie's ex-husband. The first book opens with Angie sporting a black eye, and Patrick relates a previous incident where Angie told him to "be reasonable" after she showed up covered in bruises, and Patrick's response was to reasonably beat the hell out of Phil with a pool cue. This was not the first time this happened and he seriously considers doing it again.

to:

* DomesticAbuser: Phil, Angie's ex-husband. The first book opens with Angie sporting a black eye, and Patrick relates a previous incident where Angie told him to "be reasonable" after she showed up covered in bruises, and Patrick's response was to reasonably beat the hell out of Phil with a pool cue. This was not the first time this happened and he Patrick seriously considers doing it again.again. Once Phil and Angie divorce Phil is seriously regretful of his behavior but Patrick never forgives him for it.


* DomesticAbuser: Phil, Angie's ex-husband. The first book opens with Angie sporting a black eye, and Patrick relates a previous incident where Angie told him to "be reasonable", and Patrick's response was to reasonably beat the hell out of Phil with a pool cue. This was not the first time this happened.

to:

* DomesticAbuser: Phil, Angie's ex-husband. The first book opens with Angie sporting a black eye, and Patrick relates a previous incident where Angie told him to "be reasonable", reasonable" after she showed up covered in bruises, and Patrick's response was to reasonably beat the hell out of Phil with a pool cue. This was not the first time this happened.happened and he seriously considers doing it again.


* {{Tuckerization}}: Several characters are based on real people, including Angie (the name of Lehane's real life wife) and Bubba (based on a childhood friend of Lehane's).

to:

* {{Tuckerization}}: Several characters are based on real people, including Angie (the name of Lehane's real life wife) and Bubba (based on a childhood friend of Lehane's).Lehane's who is apparently a bit of a nut but nowhere near the fictional Bubba's level).


* ParentalNeglect: Helene [=McCready=], in the fourth book, is criminally neglectful of her daughter Amanda. Amanda's uncle at one point recounts how Amanda got third degree sunburns when Helene left her outside in the sun and simply forgot about her. By the time Amanda's a teenager the girl has basically raised herself.

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* ParentalNeglect: Helene [=McCready=], in the fourth book, is criminally neglectful of her daughter Amanda. Amanda's uncle at one point Lionel recounts how toddler Amanda once got third degree sunburns when Helene left her outside in the sun and simply forgot about her. By the time Amanda's a teenager the girl has basically raised herself.

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