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* HiddenDepths: In the 1985 film, Brewster comes across at first as a working-class schmuck, a minor-league baseball player with little money or prospects. Brewster's Uncle Rupert states openly that he's disappointed in Brewster but has to name Brewster in the will because, "I'm stuck with you." But as time goes on, Brewster finds more and more creative ways to waste money, from financing an expensive exhibition game to buying a rare stamp and then ''mailing it,'' to buying a supply of expensive wine and opening the bottles and serving them. When he has a serious setback and thinks he has no chance of making the deadline, he comes up with a perfect way to drain his bank account -- ''run for Mayor and spend through the roof on his campaign.''


''Brewster's Millions'' is a novel written by George Barr [=McCutcheon=] in 1902, although it's arguably more well known for various adaptations that have been made since. The basic story revolves around Monty Brewster, an impoverished young man who inherits a substantial amount of money from a long-lost relative and also stands to further inherit a huge additional amount. (The total sum varies by time period; to fit the title, it's always in the millions or more. In the 1985 film, the original inheritance is $30 million and the full inheritance is $300 million.) But the inheritance [[OnOneCondition has a catch]]: Monty must ''waste'' the entire first amount in a limited period of time. He must end the challenge with no tangible assets whatsoever--and keep the arrangement a secret from everyone else. Monty wins the full inheritance if he pulls it off, but if he breaks any of the rules or fails to spend the first amount in full, he gets nothing.

As Monty starts hemorraging money as fast as he can, he soon realizes a horrible truth: [[SpringtimeForHitler it's amazingly difficult to lose an incredible amount of money]].

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''Brewster's Millions'' is a novel written by George Barr [=McCutcheon=] in 1902, although it's arguably more well known for various adaptations that have been made since. The basic story revolves around Monty Brewster, an impoverished young man who inherits a substantial amount of money from a long-lost relative and also stands to further inherit a huge additional amount. (The total sum varies by time period; to fit the title, it's always in the millions or more. In the 1985 film, the original inheritance is $30 million and the full inheritance is $300 million.) But the inheritance [[OnOneCondition has a catch]]: Monty must ''waste'' the entire first amount in a limited period of time. He must end the challenge with no tangible assets whatsoever--and whatsoever, with severe limits on possible outs like charity or purchasing items...and keep the arrangement a secret from everyone else. Monty wins the full inheritance if he pulls it off, but if he breaks any of the rules or fails to spend the first amount in full, he gets nothing.

As Monty starts hemorraging money as fast as he can, he soon realizes a horrible truth: [[SpringtimeForHitler it's amazingly difficult to lose an incredible amount of money]].
money]].[[note]]Well, under the conditions outlined of the will, anyway.[[/note]]


* AFoolAndHisNewMoneyAreSoonParted: The challenge Brewster goes through for the full inheritance is meant as a lesson in how to avoid this trope.


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* AFoolAndHisNewMoneyAreSoonParted: The challenge Brewster goes through for the full inheritance is meant as a lesson in how to avoid this trope.


The novel has been adapted for the screen nine times: the most famous film version remains the 1985 film starring Creator/RichardPryor and Creator/JohnCandy; the story had been adapted before in 1921, 1926 (with the protagonist changed to a woman), 1935, 1945, and 1961; a Hindi version produced in 1988 is a shot-by-shot remake of the 1985 film; a Tamil version was produced in 1997; a play based on the story was created in 1906; and the novel's plot also formed the basis of an episode of ''[[Series/PunkyBrewster It's Punky Brewster]]''.

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The novel has been adapted for the screen nine times: the most famous film version remains the 1985 film starring Creator/RichardPryor and Creator/JohnCandy; the story had been adapted before in 1921, 1926 (with the protagonist changed to a woman), 1935, 1945, and 1961; a Hindi version produced in 1988 is a shot-by-shot remake ShotForShotRemake of the 1985 film; a Tamil version was produced in 1997; a play based on the story was created in 1906; and the novel's plot also formed the basis of an episode of ''[[Series/PunkyBrewster It's Punky Brewster]]''.


*** In the 1985 film, Brewster finds a loophole to purchasing assets: [[spoiler:he buys a rare stamp, then uses it to mail a letter]]. Since he used the stamp for its intended purpose, he technically didn't give it away or destroy it. By this logic though, Brewster could have bought toys highly sought after, as they are mint-in-the-box, and un-boxed them. He can argue the fact that he's using the toy for its original purpose, [[ImmediateSelfContradiction doesn't negate the fact he's just wiped away its value as a collector's piece.]]

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*** In the 1985 film, Brewster finds a loophole to purchasing assets: [[spoiler:he buys a rare stamp, then uses it to mail a letter]]. Since he used the stamp for its intended purpose, he technically didn't give it away or destroy it. By this logic though, Brewster could have bought toys highly sought after, as they are mint-in-the-box, and un-boxed them. He can argue the fact that he's using the toy for its original purpose, [[ImmediateSelfContradiction doesn't negate the fact he's just wiped away its value as a collector's piece.]]


* BailEqualsFreedom: [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] in the 1985 film. Brewster and his best friend are arrested for a bar fight and given a choice between posting bail and showing up later for a trial or pleading guilty and paying a fine. If not for the lawyers looking for Brewster to inform him about an UnexpectedInheritance, they wouldn't be able to afford either option.


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* BailEqualsFreedom: [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] in the 1985 film. Brewster and his best friend are arrested for a bar fight and given a choice between posting bail and showing up later for a trial or pleading guilty and paying a fine. If not for the lawyers looking for Brewster to inform him about an UnexpectedInheritance, they wouldn't be able to afford either option.


* RaceLift: The 1985 film features RichardPryor as Brewster, which leads to this line from Rupert: "What's the matter? Didn't know your great-uncle was a ''honky''?"

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* RaceLift: The 1985 film features RichardPryor Creator/RichardPryor as Brewster, which leads to this line from Rupert: "What's the matter? Didn't know your great-uncle was a ''honky''?"

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** Angela, a non-lawyer, cannot legally accept a fee for representing Monty in court. Even if she could, she would not be able to perform the service she is promising to perform in exchange for the fee (defend Monty in court against Warren's lawsuit) -- thus, Monty just violated one of the terms of the will by hiring someone without getting value for her services. Leaving those issues aside, Monty was paying someone IN ADVANCE for services to be performed in the future. His right to receive those services in the future (or obtain a refund upon her failure to perform) would be considered an asset.


* JerkassFacade: Brewster may be a decent and good-hearted man, but since he can't tell anyone why he's doing what he's doing, he frequently comes off as an irresponsible jackass.

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* GoneHorriblyRight: This is the case from Brewster's point of view when the hare-brained business schemes he invests in end up making tidy profits.


** Zig-zagged: Louie, the avaricious parrot in the [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Warner Bros.]] cartoon "Dough Ray Me-Ow" (1948), is reading a book titled ''[[PunBasedTitle Rooster's Millions]]''.

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** Zig-zagged: Louie, the avaricious parrot in the [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Warner Bros.]] cartoon "Dough Ray Me-Ow" "WesternAnimation/DoughRayMeOw" (1948), is reading a book titled ''[[PunBasedTitle Rooster's Millions]]''.


*** Effectively, the attorney knows full well the money is Monty's, no argument, so just lets the money be released to Brewster, THEN starts freezing assets. Monty likely left the money effectively in trust ANYWAY, but he still has proof, for the people he had to lie to, that he had a reason for his terrible attitude towards all the things they did for him.



* JustForTheHeliOfIt: In the 1985 film, Brewster flies his minor-league baseball team in on helicopters for a press event before an exhibition game between the team and the New York Yankees (which Brewster paid to make happen). The coach says the team will be tired after the trip--which was completely unnecessary because they're just over in New Jersey and could've gotten there faster on the bus--but Brewster says he did it to make an impression. He doesn't mention that he did it so he could spend more money to fulfill the challenge.

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* JustForTheHeliOfIt: In the 1985 film, Brewster flies his minor-league baseball team in on helicopters for a press event before an exhibition game between the team and the New York Yankees (which Brewster paid to make happen). The coach says the team will be tired after the trip--which was completely unnecessary because they're just over in New Jersey and could've gotten there faster on the bus--but Brewster says he did it to make an impression. He doesn't mention that he did it so he could spend more money to fulfill the challenge.[[note]]Mainly since he couldn't tell ANYONE why he was spending so callously...[[/note]]


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** It also never explains what happened to the law firm who were planning to effectively abuse the bet to steal the money.


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*** FridgeBrilliance kicks in there. Roundfield is likely planning some very expensive and very complex legal proceedings about irregularities in the challenge. But Monty was completely above the level. He walks away with 300 mil in the bank. The people still in the room... They'll not get ANY sleep.

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** The problem is what would happen to the money. By allowing Brewster the chance to spend the $20,000 and fulfilling the will, Brewster gets the money immediately. If Roundfield had suspended the terms of the will to investigate charges of fraud, the money would continue to be held in trust until the ensuing criminal and civil investigations and trials are resolved which would likely last years. Even if Monty didn't beat the clock, Roundfield would have ordered an investigation into the fraud with the same result.


*** In the 1985 film, Brewster finds a loophole to purchasing assets: [[spoiler:he buys a rare stamp, then uses it to mail a letter]]. Since he used the stamp for its intended purpose, he technically didn't give it away or destroy it.

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*** In the 1985 film, Brewster finds a loophole to purchasing assets: [[spoiler:he buys a rare stamp, then uses it to mail a letter]]. Since he used the stamp for its intended purpose, he technically didn't give it away or destroy it. By this logic though, Brewster could have bought toys highly sought after, as they are mint-in-the-box, and un-boxed them. He can argue the fact that he's using the toy for its original purpose, [[ImmediateSelfContradiction doesn't negate the fact he's just wiped away its value as a collector's piece.]]

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