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* ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'' features the storyteller of the whole story, Scheherazade, as a playable Servant capable of summoning elements of her story, from Arabian Nights mini swordsmen to firebreathing Djinns. Interestingly, it portrayed her a bit differently than others: Her ordeal with the Sultan left her as a broken individual and made her extremely afraid to die.

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* EarnYourHappyEnding: Scheherazade runs out of tales and tells the Sultan he can kill her. But he has fallen in love with her so he lets her live and be his queen. Though, [[ValuesDissonance from a modern perspective it could be argued]] that the story is only a BittersweetEnding as Scheherazade lives but is still stuck being marrried to an insane sultan.


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* InfiniteSupplies: Subverted, Scheherazade runs out of stories eventually.


* ''TabletopGame/TalesOfTheArabianNights'' is a ChooseYourOwnAdventure-style board game that distills many of the stories into RandomEncounters and archetypes that your character can run into.

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* ''TabletopGame/TalesOfTheArabianNights'' is a ChooseYourOwnAdventure-style {{Gamebook}}-style board game that distills many of the stories into RandomEncounters and archetypes that your character can run into.


* MostWritersAreWriters: Which may be why a beautiful female Arab Storyteller gives a GeekyTurnOn.

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* MostWritersAreWriters: Which may be why One of the reasons that the storytelling Scheherazade is so enduring is that writers and artists love how she uses the power of story to save her life, heal the Sultan's madness, and save a kingdom. It doesn't hurt that Scheherazade is also beautiful female Arab Storyteller gives a GeekyTurnOn.and captivating.


** In one stage version of the play, the last line of the play is repeated several times as bomber radio chatter fades in. At the very end there's a sound of a bomb dropping, an explosion, and then all falls silent.

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** In one stage version "The Tale of Ali bin Bakkar and of Shams Al-Nahar" is all about the play, titular couple falling in love and trying to overcome the last line of fact that Shams Al-Nahar is a concubine to the play is repeated several times as bomber radio chatter fades in. At the very end there's a sound Caliph. It ends with both of a bomb dropping, an explosion, and then all falls silent.them literally [[DeathByDespair Dying By Despair]] after being separated permanently.


''The Arabian Nights'', correctly known as ''One Thousand and One Nights'' (Persian ''Hezār-o yek šab'', Arabic ''Kitāb 'alf layla wa-layla''), is a massive collection of {{Fairy Tale}}s drawn from sources as far apart as the Middle East, India, North Africa, and even China and Greece. It has for centuries shaped the European view of the [relative to Europe] "(Near) East" or "Orient", even though only [[SmallReferencePools several of the stories]] are widely known. [[GenieInABottle Genies]], [[EvilChancellor evil wazirs]] and [[MagicCarpet flying carpets]] all stem from its pages.

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''The Arabian Nights'', correctly known as ''One Thousand and One Nights'' (Persian ''Hezār-o yek šab'', Arabic ''Kitāb 'alf layla wa-layla''), is a massive Arabic collection of {{Fairy Tale}}s drawn from sources as far apart as the Middle East, India, North Africa, India, and to an extent even China and Greece. It has for centuries shaped the European view of the [relative to Europe] "(Near) East" or "Orient", even though only [[SmallReferencePools several of the stories]] are widely known. [[GenieInABottle Genies]], [[EvilChancellor evil wazirs]] and [[MagicCarpet flying carpets]] all stem from its pages.



* UnreliableNarrator: This literary device of the unreliable narrator is used in several tales, to create suspense in "The Seven Viziers" (also known as "Craft and Malice of Women" or "The Tale of the King, His Son, His Concubine and the Seven Wazirs") and "The Three Apples," and to create humor in "The Hunchback's Tale."

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* UnreliableNarrator: This literary device of the unreliable narrator is used in several tales, to create suspense in "The Seven Viziers" (also known as "Craft and Malice of Women" or "The Tale of the King, His Son, His Concubine and the Seven Wazirs") and "The Three Apples," and to create humor in "The Hunchback's Tale."" The ''Arabian Nights'' could be considered an UrExample or TropeMaker of the "unreliable narrator" concept.


Note: This list of tropes is based for the most part on the famous 19th century Richard Burton translation, which is in the public domain. Several versions, including the entire Burton version, are available on Kindle at Amazon or otherwise available for download, for free or less than a dollar. Project Gutenberg also has a free copy. Make sure to get one with an active table of contents; for that is extremely useful for this. In 2012 Penguin Publishing released a new three-volume English translation by Malcolm Lyons. It used the same source as the Burton translation and mostly corresponds to the same list of stories.


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!!A note on canon:

As noted above there is no definitive canon to the ''Arabian Nights'', as the list of stories was expanded by various writers over centuries. This list of tropes is based for the most part on the famous 19th century Richard Burton translation, which is in the public domain. Several versions, including the entire Burton version, are available on Kindle at Amazon or otherwise available for download, for free or less than a dollar. Project Gutenberg also has a free copy. Make sure to get one with an active table of contents; for that is extremely useful for this. In 2012 Penguin Publishing released a new three-volume English translation by Malcolm Lyons. It used the same source as the Burton translation and mostly corresponds to the same list of stories.

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* PluckyGirl: Scheherazade

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* %%* PluckyGirl: Scheherazade


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* RocBirds: The TropeCodifier, in fact: while rocs appear in many older legends, this is the work where the most widely known and referenced story featuring them -- that of the voyages of Sinbad the Sailor -- was penned. The roc appears in two specific parts of the story:
** In Sinbad's second voyage, he becomes stranded on an island inhabited by rocs. He escapes by attaching himself to one of the enormous birds when it flies away and lets it carry him to the mainland, where it lands after reaching a valley home to monstrous snakes large enough to swallow an elephant whole -- these snakes being the rocs' main prey.
** In Sinbad's fifth voyage, he and his crew land on an island where they discover a gigantic roc egg taller than a man. They break it despite Sinbad's warnings, and the unborn chick provides enough meat to feed the whole crew. This comes to bite the crew shortly thereafter when they try to leave: the furious parents chase them and bombard their ship with massive boulders, sinking it.


* AbridgedForChildren: ''The Thousand and One Nights'' has also seen a number of children* 's editions, leaving out the erotic and scatological tales. As well as the fact that the entire book is based on a woman's spinning wild "cliffhanger" tales, in order to avoid being killed by her paranoid-jealous husband (to prevent her from cheating on him), by keeping him in suspense to hear the ending!

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* AbridgedForChildren: ''The Thousand and One Nights'' has also seen a number of children* 's children's editions, leaving out the erotic and scatological tales. As well as the fact that the entire book is based on a woman's spinning wild "cliffhanger" tales, in order to avoid being killed by her paranoid-jealous husband (to prevent her from cheating on him), by keeping him in suspense to hear the ending!


* ''TabletopGame/TalesOfTheArabianNights'' is a ChooseYourOwnAdventure-style board game that distills many of the stories into RandomEncounters and archetypes that your character can run into.



* AbridgedForChildren: ''The Thousand and One Nights'' has also seen a number of children's editions, leaving out the erotic and scatalogical tales. As well as the fact that the entire book is based on a woman's spinning wild "cliffhanger" tales, in order to avoid being killed by her paranoid-jealous husband (to prevent her from cheating on him), by keeping him in suspense to hear the ending!

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* AbridgedForChildren: ''The Thousand and One Nights'' has also seen a number of children's children* 's editions, leaving out the erotic and scatalogical scatological tales. As well as the fact that the entire book is based on a woman's spinning wild "cliffhanger" tales, in order to avoid being killed by her paranoid-jealous husband (to prevent her from cheating on him), by keeping him in suspense to hear the ending!


The [[FramingDevice frame]] for the story cycle is the tale of King Shahryar and Scheherazade. The King's first wife had cheated on him, so he had her executed. Then, feeling that no woman could be trusted, he hit upon a plan only [[TheCaligula a powerful and insane tyrant]] could pull off: He'd marry a woman, spend the night with her, and then, in the morning, send her off to the royal Wazir (aka vizier) to be executed. No woman would ever betray him again!

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The [[FramingDevice frame]] {{fram|ingDevice}}e for the story cycle is the tale of King Shahryar and Scheherazade. The King's first wife had cheated on him, so he had her executed. Then, feeling that no woman could be trusted, he hit upon a plan only [[TheCaligula a powerful and insane tyrant]] could pull off: He'd marry a woman, spend the night with her, and then, in the morning, send her off to the royal Wazir (aka vizier) to be executed. No woman would ever betray him again!



* CanonImmigrant: Many of the stories do not appear in the earliest manuscripts. This includes three of the most famous tales in the series -- "SinbadTheSailor," "[[Literature/{{Aladdin}} Aladdin and his Wonderful Lamp]]," and "Literature/AliBabaAndTheFortyThieves." "Aladdin" and "Ali Baba" for their part do not appear in any manuscript or copy before [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoine_Galland Antoine Galland's]] translation. In Burton's translation, only "Sinbad" makes the main collection; "Aladdin" and "Ali Baba" are relegated to the supplemental volumes.

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* CanonImmigrant: Many of the stories do not appear in the earliest manuscripts. This includes three of the most famous tales in the series -- "SinbadTheSailor," "Literature/SinbadTheSailor," "[[Literature/{{Aladdin}} Aladdin and his Wonderful Lamp]]," and "Literature/AliBabaAndTheFortyThieves." "Aladdin" and "Ali Baba" for their part do not appear in any manuscript or copy before [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoine_Galland Antoine Galland's]] translation. In Burton's translation, only "Sinbad" makes the main collection; "Aladdin" and "Ali Baba" are relegated to the supplemental volumes.


* ''TabletopGames/{{GURPS}} Arabian Nights'' takes the title as the jumping-off place for an extended discussion of the depiction of medieval Islamic culture, society, and myths and stories in {{Tabletop RPG}}s.

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* ''TabletopGames/{{GURPS}} ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} Arabian Nights'' takes the title as the jumping-off place for an extended discussion of the depiction of medieval Islamic culture, society, and myths and stories in {{Tabletop RPG}}s.


* ''TabletopGames/{{GURPS}} Arabian Nights'' takes the title as the jumping-off place for an extended discussion of the depiction of medieval Islamic culture, society, and myths and stories in {{tabletop|Games}} roleplaying games.

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* ''TabletopGames/{{GURPS}} Arabian Nights'' takes the title as the jumping-off place for an extended discussion of the depiction of medieval Islamic culture, society, and myths and stories in {{tabletop|Games}} roleplaying games.{{Tabletop RPG}}s.

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* ''TabletopGames/{{GURPS}} Arabian Nights'' takes the title as the jumping-off place for an extended discussion of the depiction of medieval Islamic culture, society, and myths and stories in {{tabletop|Games}} roleplaying games.

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** In "King Yunan and the Sage Duban," the king is convinced by the evil vizier that the Sage Duban was an enemy spy, and that he could kill the king by poisoning anything he touched. The King has the Sage captured and is about to kill him, when the Sage hastily says he possesses a book that will allow the king to ask his severed head for advice. The King is intrigued, and lets the sage go get the book...[[WhatAnIdiot which the sage then poisons, killing the king]].

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