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*** We ''used'' to think that binocular vision thing was the case, but it turns out the brain is a lot more adaptable than we thought. It's called neuroplasticity. In the same way, if someone suffers a brain injury in the part of the brain that controls, say, speech, another part of the brain can learn to take over that job. It takes a lot of work, a lot of therapy, but it can be done. The implications for magic are interesting....

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** Presumably, yes. I'm not familiar with the book, but it's possible that some of the abilities Dracula demonstrates in the book are peculiar to him, or perhaps they're magic of a kind most blampires haven't mastered, since he has centuries of experience.

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** I think the Fae only have a problem with someone using the bane against them. Theyíre pretty chauvinistic that way.
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[[folder: The Black Court and Bram Stoker]]
So the books state that Bram Stokerís Dracula is basically a how-to guide for fighting and killing Black Court vampires, and the White Council was involved in the publishing and promoting of the novel in order to undermine the Black Court. Yet there are a number of vampire traits in Stokerís work that donít appear to be true for the BC. For instance, in the book Dracula is stabbed by a sailor but the knife passes through like thin air, he can control certain animals (he summons a swarm of rats), he can slip through tiny cracks, and has limited control over weather. Also a wild rose stalk placed on his coffin will prevent him from escaping it. (See the Dracula Wikipedia page for more.) So my question is, are all those things also true of the Black Court? Could Mavra be imprisoned in her coffin by a wild rose stalk? Can she slip through tiny gaps?


** I think that there is a case to be argued that there is a difference between the "office" of the Erlking or Summer King, and the "person" of Herne the Hunter. I'm a little uncertain as to exactly ''how'' the Faerie courts affect natural phenomena, but let's just assume that somehow they do. If the Erlking or "Summer King" is a mantle of power, and mantles of power are organized along the idea of "checks and balances", than it makes sense that it would be a predator, designed to check the otherwise unfettered growth and vitality of the Summer Court. The Summer Court is just as happy spreading mass bacterial plagues as they are encouraging people to make babies (after all, bacteria are living things too!). In the same way, if the Winter King or "Santa Claus" is a mantle of power, than it makes sense that he would be kind, to check the otherwise unfettered callousness and ruthlessness of Winter. If that is true, than the Erlking and Santa Claus may both morally accountable for their actions in how they wield the power of their offices. When one becomes a police officer, after all, one ''has'' to enforce the law, but one also has what is known as "discretion" as to how one carries out one's duties. One can either be a genuinely caring and effective police officer, a drunken obsessive Jimmy McNulty, or a heartless Inspector Javert. If one fails to uphold one's duties as a police officer, than one faces ''severe'' penalties, because of the potential damage a police officer can do. Similarly, I suspect that when one acquires a mantle of power, one has a degree of discretion in how one carries out one's duties. When Maeve failed to perform her duties, she faced ''severe'' (i.e. fatal) consequences. (Of course, the difference is that while one ''chooses'' to be a police officer. The current Winter Lady had no choice, and evidence indicates that she cannot leave the post except in the advent of her death, which is quite objectionable). While Herne may "have" to hunt things to fulfill the function of his office, and the mantle re-wires the pleasure centres of Herne's brain so that he ''wants'' to, he still has a ''choice'' as to how he carries out his duties, and it still may be possible for him to neglect or abuse the powers of his office.

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** I think that there is a case to be argued that there is a difference between the "office" of the Erlking or Summer King, and the "person" of Herne the Hunter. I'm a little uncertain as to exactly ''how'' the Faerie courts affect natural phenomena, but let's just assume that somehow they do. If the Erlking or "Summer King" is a mantle of power, and mantles of power are organized along the idea of "checks and balances", than it makes sense that it would be a predator, designed to check the otherwise unfettered growth and vitality of the Summer Court. The Summer Court is just as happy spreading mass bacterial plagues as they are encouraging people to make babies (after all, bacteria are living things too!). In the same way, if the Winter King or "Santa Claus" is a mantle of power, than it makes sense that he would be kind, to check the otherwise unfettered callousness and ruthlessness of Winter. If that is true, than the Erlking and Santa Claus may both morally accountable for their actions in how they wield the power of their offices. When one becomes a police officer, after all, one ''has'' to enforce the law, but one also has what is known as "discretion" as to how one carries out one's duties. One can either be a genuinely caring and effective police officer, a drunken obsessive Jimmy McNulty, [=McNulty=], or a heartless Inspector Javert. If one fails to uphold one's duties as a police officer, than one faces ''severe'' penalties, because of the potential damage a police officer can do. Similarly, I suspect that when one acquires a mantle of power, one has a degree of discretion in how one carries out one's duties. When Maeve failed to perform her duties, she faced ''severe'' (i.e. fatal) consequences. (Of course, the difference is that while one ''chooses'' to be a police officer. The current Winter Lady had no choice, and evidence indicates that she cannot leave the post except in the advent of her death, which is quite objectionable). While Herne may "have" to hunt things to fulfill the function of his office, and the mantle re-wires the pleasure centres of Herne's brain so that he ''wants'' to, he still has a ''choice'' as to how he carries out his duties, and it still may be possible for him to neglect or abuse the powers of his office.

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** Also, many common modern firearms have many portions made of plastics and composites for the purposes of saving weight--famously Glock's "plastic guns". Often this includes the grips and stocks, so with careful handling and the use of gloves it shouldn't be too difficult for fae to wield them.

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** It is possible to make guns out of ceramics and plastics, it's just expensive and inefficient to do so... unless you're, y'know, someone who can't hold iron-based weaponry.


** Excellent point. Well, we know they have some kind of non-steel metal they make their armour and weapons out of (Lloyd in ''Summer Knight,'' Fix and Kringle in ''Cold Days'', et al), so perhaps they used that to make guns?

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** Excellent point. Well, we know they have some kind of non-steel metal they make their armour and weapons out of (Lloyd in ''Summer Knight,'' Fix and Kringle in ''Cold Days'', et al), so perhaps they used that to make guns?guns and bullets?


* I remember a segment in ''Small Favor'' where three of the Gruff brothers try to wax Harry with handheld firearms, which is a cut above their fairy kin in terms of ingenuity and pragmatism. The problem is; aren't those made out of metal? (Harry proves in short order that Gruffs are NOT immune to steel). This raises a number of issues, such as how they got their hands on the things in the first place, or how were they able to handle "the bane" once they did.

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* I remember a segment in ''Small Favor'' where three of the Gruff brothers try to wax Harry with handheld firearms, which is a cut above their fairy kin in terms of ingenuity and pragmatism. The problem is; is, aren't those made out of metal? (Harry proves in short order that Gruffs are NOT immune to steel). This raises a number of issues, such as how they got their hands on the things in the first place, or how were they able to handle "the bane" once they did.


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** Excellent point. Well, we know they have some kind of non-steel metal they make their armour and weapons out of (Lloyd in ''Summer Knight,'' Fix and Kringle in ''Cold Days'', et al), so perhaps they used that to make guns?


** A fair suggestion. Yet from what "Tiny" said in the same book, I got the impression that using "The Bane" as a weapon (even in a life or death situation) was a horrid taboo throughout the summer court.

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** A fair suggestion. Yet from what "Tiny" said in the same book, I got the impression that using "The Bane" as a weapon (even in a life or death situation) was a horrid taboo throughout the summer court. Fairies seem to be not just physically, but also mentally and culturally repulsed by the stuff.

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** A fair suggestion. Yet from what "Tiny" said in the same book, I got the impression that using "The Bane" as a weapon (even in a life or death situation) was a horrid taboo throughout the summer court.

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** Maybe they wore gloves?

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[[/folder]]

[[folder: Faeries using guns? What are they made out of?]]
* I remember a segment in ''Small Favor'' where three of the Gruff brothers try to wax Harry with handheld firearms, which is a cut above their fairy kin in terms of ingenuity and pragmatism. The problem is; aren't those made out of metal? (Harry proves in short order that Gruffs are NOT immune to steel). This raises a number of issues, such as how they got their hands on the things in the first place, or how were they able to handle "the bane" once they did.

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** Incorrect. Look up the difference between declarative and procedural memory for an example. See also Capgras Syndrome, in which the emotional associations with familiar people are inaccessible - sufferers claim loved ones are somehow perfect imposters who have replaced their actual families, and cannot be convinced otherwise.

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* Kumori said they would be just as happy to see Harry's copy destroyed. There were collecting the books to try to keep the other necromancers from reading them, not because they needed the book themselves.

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